Ebola Travel Ban: Be Careful What You Ask For

There is a lot of talk among conservatives about how Obama needs to impose a travel ban to and from Ebola-stricken countries.  It sounds logical enough – if they’ve been exposed, we should not allow them in here.  I agree, but life under Obama is never that simple.

We have all seen how this president reacts when he feels slighted or compelled to do something that flies in the face of his ideology.  He finds a way to get his pound of flesh from conservatism.  Look at what he did to General Stanley McChrystal and later to Dinesh D’Souza. 

Obama is not just going to do the right thing and stop passengers to and from the hot zone.  He may stop the travel, but he’ll also use the ban as an excuse to double the size of the TSA.  There is no way he will ever engage a private company.  It just isn’t in his DNA to accept any solution that doesn’t call for more government.  Only hemorrhaging poll numbers will get him to bend on that rule, as we saw with healthcare.gov.  Hemorrhaging people don’t matter one whit to him, unless of course their surnames are Soros or Steyer.

I say we leave well enough alone this time.  The CDC and hospitals are learning the hard way, as has nurse Amber Vinson, whose unfortunate impulse was to trust government over her own medical experience and training.  For those who don’t know, she treated the Ebola-stricken Liberian Thomas Eric Duncan, then called the CDC to ask their "permission" to get on a commercial flight, as if that agency has any way of making an informed decision over the phone.

This series of events has clubbed the poor big government horse left to die by GM, the stimulus, Obamacare, the VA, Bowe Bergdahl, the IRS, the NSA, and on and on.  I would laugh if the consequences of these failures were not so dire.

Marco Milaneci is an IT compliance program manager at a Fortune 500 company.  He can be reached at mmblog [at] austin.rr.com.

There is a lot of talk among conservatives about how Obama needs to impose a travel ban to and from Ebola-stricken countries.  It sounds logical enough – if they’ve been exposed, we should not allow them in here.  I agree, but life under Obama is never that simple.

We have all seen how this president reacts when he feels slighted or compelled to do something that flies in the face of his ideology.  He finds a way to get his pound of flesh from conservatism.  Look at what he did to General Stanley McChrystal and later to Dinesh D’Souza. 

Obama is not just going to do the right thing and stop passengers to and from the hot zone.  He may stop the travel, but he’ll also use the ban as an excuse to double the size of the TSA.  There is no way he will ever engage a private company.  It just isn’t in his DNA to accept any solution that doesn’t call for more government.  Only hemorrhaging poll numbers will get him to bend on that rule, as we saw with healthcare.gov.  Hemorrhaging people don’t matter one whit to him, unless of course their surnames are Soros or Steyer.

I say we leave well enough alone this time.  The CDC and hospitals are learning the hard way, as has nurse Amber Vinson, whose unfortunate impulse was to trust government over her own medical experience and training.  For those who don’t know, she treated the Ebola-stricken Liberian Thomas Eric Duncan, then called the CDC to ask their "permission" to get on a commercial flight, as if that agency has any way of making an informed decision over the phone.

This series of events has clubbed the poor big government horse left to die by GM, the stimulus, Obamacare, the VA, Bowe Bergdahl, the IRS, the NSA, and on and on.  I would laugh if the consequences of these failures were not so dire.

Marco Milaneci is an IT compliance program manager at a Fortune 500 company.  He can be reached at mmblog [at] austin.rr.com.