Castro's bad medicine

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Fidel Castro loudly volunteered the services of 1,600 Cuban doctors to New Orleans, making a bet that if the U.S. didn't take them, it could look like vicious meanie on the world stage. For him, that's a propaganda victory. Naturally, assorted clowns in the U.S. are urging the U.S. to take them.

But today's Investor's Business Daily makes the argument against it.  Castro's record on medical aid is a bad one. Wherever Castro's Cuban doctors go, political havoc follows. There are a whole string of incidents. It's happening right now in Honduras and Venezuela.  And as we reported in American Thinker here, Paraguay threw these Cuban doctors out for trying to overthrow the government.

For a profession as pacific and apolitical as medicine, these Castroite Cuban doctors sure do manage to create an unusual load of trouble. They're the last thing Hurricane—battered New Orleans needs.

A.M. Mora y Leon 09 09 05  

 

Fidel Castro loudly volunteered the services of 1,600 Cuban doctors to New Orleans, making a bet that if the U.S. didn't take them, it could look like vicious meanie on the world stage. For him, that's a propaganda victory. Naturally, assorted clowns in the U.S. are urging the U.S. to take them.

But today's Investor's Business Daily makes the argument against it.  Castro's record on medical aid is a bad one. Wherever Castro's Cuban doctors go, political havoc follows. There are a whole string of incidents. It's happening right now in Honduras and Venezuela.  And as we reported in American Thinker here, Paraguay threw these Cuban doctors out for trying to overthrow the government.

For a profession as pacific and apolitical as medicine, these Castroite Cuban doctors sure do manage to create an unusual load of trouble. They're the last thing Hurricane—battered New Orleans needs.

A.M. Mora y Leon 09 09 05