In California, Recalls are not Just for the Governor

Just about everyone in America is aware that California Governor Gavin Newsom is facing a recall election.  But California has a lot more recall news than simply the recall of its governor.  In fact, the state is in the midst of a genuine recallapalooza.  The state has recall challenges underway for not just the governor, but also two district attorneys and over 48 assorted mayors, city councilmen, and school board members.  And that recall count is only as of July.  It seems that it’s not all love and harmony in the Golden State.

Governor Newsom is facing recall because he’s totally botched everything he’s touched.  Crime is up and liberty is down.  The forests are burning and the electricity has to be turned off occasionally to prevent more fires.  As long as they’re trying to be the Central America of the north, they might as well have a power grid to go with it.  They wouldn’t want their new guests to feel homesick.

Newsom even managed to mess up the COVID lockdowns.  Churches were closed but movie studios were allowed to keep operating.  Small businesses and restaurants were crushed by the lockdowns, except if they happened to be hosting Governor Hair-Gel and his friends.

The MSM is predicting that he’ll survive the recall, but I remember the last time California recalled its governor.  It was for power outages -- and we’re moving into the annual blackout season in the richest state of the republic.

The district attorneys of both San Francisco (Chesa Boudin) and Los Angeles (George Gascón) are also facing recall.  It seems both are more interested in social justice than criminal justice.  Both of these gentlemen are rare politicians who actually keep their word.  They ran on platforms of righting societal wrongs by rethinking how we charge and prosecute criminals -- who are really victims of systemic something or other.  And they’re actually doing it.  George Gascón is even being sued by his own prosecutors for constraining them from prosecuting criminals.  Maybe the voters should have paid more attention to what these two SJWs promised to do if elected.

A number of mayors and city councilmen are being recalled because they made no attempt to resist the state’s oppressive COVID lockdowns.  It turns out that people elected them to actually represent their constituents, not the state government leviathan.  Apparently, these politicians didn’t realize that the freest people in the world would like to keep their -- you know -- freedom.  If the local politicians can’t stand up for that, then the local population would like to fire them and get someone who will.

A whole plethora of school board members is also being recalled.  The common complaint seems to be that they were spending more time renaming schools than actually getting them back open.  Why can’t the local rubes understand that we can’t have schools be symbols of oppression to the students that aren’t there?

This all begs the question -- Why did Californians elect all of these clowns?  They’re all doing exactly what they said they’d do.  Weren’t Californians paying attention to their campaign speeches?  Apparently, life in California is so wonderful that nobody has time for boring politics.

It’s unfortunate that Californians even have the option to recall politicians.  Voters should live with the consequences of their choice for at least one political term.  Electing politicians is not buying a product from a satisfaction-guaranteed infomercial.  There is no risk-free 30-day trial and voters shouldn’t be allowed to return them for a full refund if dissatisfied.

Voting is an important decision -- perhaps the most important we make as members of our republic.  The outcomes affect the welfare of our citizens and the future of our country.  Our choices should only be made after carefully vetting the candidates and their policies.  As every parent knows, when children escape consequences, they repeat their mistakes.  When voters escape the consequences of bad decisions, bad decisions become their pattern.  Just look at the California voter’s choices since their last recall to see how this plays out.

In 2003 California recalled Governor Gray Davis.  While Davis had many shortcomings, the fact that the state couldn’t keep the electricity on was the last straw (sound familiar?).  The recall was successful, the horrible Davis was out, and California was on a new political trajectory -- right?  Wrong!  The state elected a body-builder action-hero who was decidedly more heroic in his movies than in office.  Governor “Ahnold” was then followed by Governor “Moonbeam.”  This was actually California’s second dance with Jerry Brown.  He had previously been the governor from 1975-1983.  He didn’t impress anyone with his first time in office, but maybe age would make him better. While it works with wine, it didn’t in his case.  When Governor “Moonbeam” left office, Californians turned to Governor “Hair-Gel” Newsom -- the current recall target.  The voters have traveled this road before and didn’t learn a darn thing.

Put simply, recalls make it too easy to avoid the consequences of bad decisions.  Voters need to live through at least one term of the leadership that they select.  And the rest of us are entitled to at least one full term to ridicule them for their choices.  Seriously, did San Francisco elect someone raised by terrorists to be their top law enforcement officer?  And now they act surprised that crime is skyrocketing? 

I used to live in Minnesota. We had to survive one full term of Jesse “The Body” Ventura, to atone for losing our collective minds -- so it’s not just a California thing.

John Green is a political refugee from Minnesota, now residing in Star, Idaho. He is a retired engineer with 40 years of experience in the areas of product development, quality assurance, organizational development, and corporate strategic planning. He currently writes at the American Free News Network.  He can be followed on Facebook or reached at greenjeg@gmail.com.

Image: Thomas Hawk

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