Should William Barr Be Barred from Confirmation?

We're about to see justice in America once more.

At least that's the picture we get from watching Fox News, as media pundits assure us that William Barr, President Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general, is a consummate professional and dedicated proponent of the rule of law.  According to Joe diGenova, "Bill Barr is a man of great legal and ethical stature."  In fact, when Robert Mueller uncharacteristically called out BuzzFeed for circulating a false story, diGenova was quick to point to Barr as the reason, since Mueller recognized that there was a "new sheriff in town" who would fire him if he failed to correct BuzzFeed's fake news.

Well and good.

But consider what followed scarcely a week later: the shameful pre-dawn FBI raid of Roger Stone's home, and Stone's removal in handcuffs, all gleefully filmed by CNN, which had been mysteriously tipped off so it could broadcast the theatrics for its Trump-hating viewers.

Right under the new sheriff's nose, Mueller sent heavily armed shock troops to arrest 66-year-old Stone as if he were a dangerous criminal or a flight risk.  The specter of Barr in the background was not enough to stop this Gestapo-like tactic against a law-abiding citizen.  Mueller, who pulled this KGB-style raid before in the case of Paul Manafort – another man whose crime seems to be his support for Donald Trump – brazenly flexed his unconstitutional muscles once more.

Just as worrisome, to my way of thinking, is the fact that Mueller and Barr are pals.  In fact, Barr invited Mueller to the weddings of both of his daughters.  Mueller's and Barr's wives belong to the same Bible study group.  Yet the only commentator I've heard on Fox who finds Barr's cozy friendship with Mueller troubling is former federal prosecutor Sidney Powell.

Larry Klayman, founder of Judicial Watch, says, "The president should withdraw Bill Barr.  There are other people he can get in there who are not cozy with Mueller."

There is also talk of Barr, due to a memo he wrote last June on the Russia probe, having to recuse himself from oversight of Mueller!  The president is risking the appointment of Sessions 2.0.

During his hearing, Barr stated that he would not consider ending Mueller's probe and that he doesn't view Mueller's investigation as a "witch hunt."

Huh?  Did he say that because the Dems might have blocked his confirmation or because he's playing for the Deep State team?  In fact, as we all know, it's a witch hunt on steroids.

Nor is it reassuring to review Barr's record.

For one thing, Barr supported gun control before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1991.  Then there's his role in the tragedy of Ruby Ridge, which happened under his watch as A.G.  In a nutshell, the FBI, apparently based on false information, began surveillance of Randy Weaver, who lived off the grid in Idaho with his family.  It's a complicated tale, which reached its climax when the ATF, U.S. marshals, and the FBI decided to escalate, eventually using deadly force against virtually all members of Weaver's family.  They killed his 14-year-old son and murdered his wife Vicki in cold blood as she stood in the doorway of their cabin, holding their infant son in her arms.  Weaver survived being shot in the back and went on to win a judgment of over $3 million from the DOJ.

So what did A.G. Barr do after this tragedy concluded?

He fought to protect the FBI sniper who killed Vicki Weaver from being criminally charged.  According to a 1995 Senate Judiciary Committee report, then-attorney general Barr "helped to weaken the bond of trust that must exist between ordinary Americans and our law enforcement agencies."  In other words, Barr essentially sanctioned the unconstitutional use of brute force against innocent civilians.

Today, many pundits and politicos are singing Barr's praises.  I for one don't find this reassuring. 

Recall that when Robert Mueller was appointed as special counsel, Fox News ran this headline: "Robert Mueller appointment to lead Russia probe wins bipartisan praise." Here's a sampling of such praise:

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah): "Mueller is a great selection.  Impeccable credentials.  Should be widely accepted."

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine): "The Deputy Attorney General made an excellent choice in selecting former FBI Director Robert Mueller to serve as special counsel.  He has sterling credentials and is above reproach."

Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.): "Robert Mueller is an exceptional public servant – from his days as a decorated Marine, through his years as a federal prosecutor, to his time as head of the criminal division and then as Acting Deputy Attorney General, and then onto his twelve years of principled leadership as the Director of the FBI.  His record, character, and trustworthiness have been lauded for decades by Republicans and Democrats alike."

Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.): "This is a victory for all Americans who believe in the integrity of the rule of law."  And then this: "We must follow the facts wherever they lead, and demand complete accountability for any wrongdoing that is found."

Well, I agree with that last statement.  The facts, if followed, clearly lead to plenty of wrongdoing by the Obama administration's DOJ and FBI, as well as its State Department, including the outrages of Benghazi, the Uranium One scandal, and the long list of Hillary's high crimes and misdemeanors, for openers.

Back to William Barr.  According to CNN reporter Laura Jarrett, guess who was "elated" by the choice of Bill Barr for attorney general. It was none other than...wait for it...Rod Rosenstein.

I rest my case.

We're about to see justice in America once more.

At least that's the picture we get from watching Fox News, as media pundits assure us that William Barr, President Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general, is a consummate professional and dedicated proponent of the rule of law.  According to Joe diGenova, "Bill Barr is a man of great legal and ethical stature."  In fact, when Robert Mueller uncharacteristically called out BuzzFeed for circulating a false story, diGenova was quick to point to Barr as the reason, since Mueller recognized that there was a "new sheriff in town" who would fire him if he failed to correct BuzzFeed's fake news.

Well and good.

But consider what followed scarcely a week later: the shameful pre-dawn FBI raid of Roger Stone's home, and Stone's removal in handcuffs, all gleefully filmed by CNN, which had been mysteriously tipped off so it could broadcast the theatrics for its Trump-hating viewers.

Right under the new sheriff's nose, Mueller sent heavily armed shock troops to arrest 66-year-old Stone as if he were a dangerous criminal or a flight risk.  The specter of Barr in the background was not enough to stop this Gestapo-like tactic against a law-abiding citizen.  Mueller, who pulled this KGB-style raid before in the case of Paul Manafort – another man whose crime seems to be his support for Donald Trump – brazenly flexed his unconstitutional muscles once more.

Just as worrisome, to my way of thinking, is the fact that Mueller and Barr are pals.  In fact, Barr invited Mueller to the weddings of both of his daughters.  Mueller's and Barr's wives belong to the same Bible study group.  Yet the only commentator I've heard on Fox who finds Barr's cozy friendship with Mueller troubling is former federal prosecutor Sidney Powell.

Larry Klayman, founder of Judicial Watch, says, "The president should withdraw Bill Barr.  There are other people he can get in there who are not cozy with Mueller."

There is also talk of Barr, due to a memo he wrote last June on the Russia probe, having to recuse himself from oversight of Mueller!  The president is risking the appointment of Sessions 2.0.

During his hearing, Barr stated that he would not consider ending Mueller's probe and that he doesn't view Mueller's investigation as a "witch hunt."

Huh?  Did he say that because the Dems might have blocked his confirmation or because he's playing for the Deep State team?  In fact, as we all know, it's a witch hunt on steroids.

Nor is it reassuring to review Barr's record.

For one thing, Barr supported gun control before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1991.  Then there's his role in the tragedy of Ruby Ridge, which happened under his watch as A.G.  In a nutshell, the FBI, apparently based on false information, began surveillance of Randy Weaver, who lived off the grid in Idaho with his family.  It's a complicated tale, which reached its climax when the ATF, U.S. marshals, and the FBI decided to escalate, eventually using deadly force against virtually all members of Weaver's family.  They killed his 14-year-old son and murdered his wife Vicki in cold blood as she stood in the doorway of their cabin, holding their infant son in her arms.  Weaver survived being shot in the back and went on to win a judgment of over $3 million from the DOJ.

So what did A.G. Barr do after this tragedy concluded?

He fought to protect the FBI sniper who killed Vicki Weaver from being criminally charged.  According to a 1995 Senate Judiciary Committee report, then-attorney general Barr "helped to weaken the bond of trust that must exist between ordinary Americans and our law enforcement agencies."  In other words, Barr essentially sanctioned the unconstitutional use of brute force against innocent civilians.

Today, many pundits and politicos are singing Barr's praises.  I for one don't find this reassuring. 

Recall that when Robert Mueller was appointed as special counsel, Fox News ran this headline: "Robert Mueller appointment to lead Russia probe wins bipartisan praise." Here's a sampling of such praise:

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah): "Mueller is a great selection.  Impeccable credentials.  Should be widely accepted."

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine): "The Deputy Attorney General made an excellent choice in selecting former FBI Director Robert Mueller to serve as special counsel.  He has sterling credentials and is above reproach."

Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.): "Robert Mueller is an exceptional public servant – from his days as a decorated Marine, through his years as a federal prosecutor, to his time as head of the criminal division and then as Acting Deputy Attorney General, and then onto his twelve years of principled leadership as the Director of the FBI.  His record, character, and trustworthiness have been lauded for decades by Republicans and Democrats alike."

Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.): "This is a victory for all Americans who believe in the integrity of the rule of law."  And then this: "We must follow the facts wherever they lead, and demand complete accountability for any wrongdoing that is found."

Well, I agree with that last statement.  The facts, if followed, clearly lead to plenty of wrongdoing by the Obama administration's DOJ and FBI, as well as its State Department, including the outrages of Benghazi, the Uranium One scandal, and the long list of Hillary's high crimes and misdemeanors, for openers.

Back to William Barr.  According to CNN reporter Laura Jarrett, guess who was "elated" by the choice of Bill Barr for attorney general. It was none other than...wait for it...Rod Rosenstein.

I rest my case.