Democrat Midterm Wins and the Cult of Diversity

Earlier this week, I received an email from Hillary Clinton's 2020 Presidential campaign – er, I mean her political action committee, Onward Together, trumpeting that 19 of the 23 Democrat women elected to the U.S. House of Representatives last week have never held office.

Same day, I stumbled upon this graphic from MoveOn:

Muslims and American Indians and lesbian mothers, oh my!  Halal and gambling for all!

How is any of the "first" traits touted in this graphic a lawmaking skill and qualification?

Despite losing over 900 state elections and 100 national elections in the last decade, I've never vacillated in my belief that Democrats are just flat-out better at selling politics than Republicans are.

The Dishonesty of the Diversity Cult

Donald Trump's glass ceiling-shattering election, as our nation's first true civilian president, was far more historic than Obama's election of our first black president.  But in Trump's case, Republicans weren't motivated to make history the way Obama voters were; they were motivated by fear of a President Clinton.

The sexiness and allure of the "first" this or that is where Democrats have always thrived.  As I discuss in my upcoming book, 10 Warning Signs Your Child Is Becoming a Democrat, Democrats are highly adept at marketing minority status, race, ethnicity, sex, lifestyle choices, and sexual orientation as skills and qualifications.

So just how diverse are the districts and seats they won?  If we define diversity as at least some ideological and electoral balance, then most aren't diverse at all.

The Muslims

Ilhan Omar, of Minnesota, and Rashida Tlaib, of Michigan, are our first Muslim congresswomen.

Omar won her election by 56 percentage points; her district, MN-5, has been represented only by Democrats for the last 20,000 consecutive days.  Before her win, she had served in the Minnesota state House of Representatives.

Tlaib, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America, won by 73 percentage points; her district, MI-13, has been only Democrat for the last 25,500 consecutive days.  Before winning, she had served in the Michigan state House of Representatives.

How, pray tell, does being Muslim make one qualified for political office?  What is the unique skill set brought to the legislative table by virtue of their Islamic faith?  Do they perhaps have some superpowers, given their sex?  Did anyone in the DMIC (Democrat Media Industrial Complex) ever once ask questions like these? 

The American Indians

Sharice Davids, of Kansas, and Deb Haaland, of New Mexico, are our first American Indian congresswomen.

Davids won her election by nine percentage points; her district, KS-3, has been red for 55 of the last 57 years.  Davids has never held elected office.

Haaland won her election by 23 percentage points; her district, NM-1, has been only Democrat for the last 3,500 consecutive days.  She was previously the elected chair of the Democratic Party of New Mexico.

I struggle to see how American Indian genealogy confirms a priori lawmaking erudition.  Perhaps a Democrat reading this can enlighten me.

Gay and Lesbian

Angie Craig won Minnesota's 2nd Congressional District by 5 percentage points in a district that's been only Republican for the last 17 years.  She has never held elected office.

Craig is the first openly lesbian mother to be elected to Congress.  How, I wonder, is being a lesbian mother a skill?  I certainly concur that being a good mother is a skill.  Whether one believes that lesbianism is genetic, or a lifestyle choice, will it produce ideas to increase our economic gains?

Jared Polis, currently a U.S. Representative for Colorado's 2nd Congressional District, is now the Centennial State's first openly gay male elected governor.  I debit some "first" points for being a white guy.  Colorado has had only Democrat governors for the last 4,300 consecutive days.  Openly gay was a crucial résumé-selling point, which got me wondering: what unique advantage will Polis have as his state's chief executive as openly gay, compared to not openly gay?

Blacks and Latina...or Is it Latinx?

Veronica Escobar and Sylvia Garcia are Texas's first Latina congresswomen.

Escobar won her election by 41 percentage points; her district, TX-16, has been only Democrat for the last 19,500 consecutive days.  Escobar, a former elected El Paso County judge, is replacing Robert Francis O'Rourke, whom I refer to as The Beto.  He deserves singular name recognition, à la Oprah, for his oh, so close loss to U.S. Senator Ted Cruz earlier this month.

Garcia has an especial "first" as the first female Latinx.  At first glance, Latinx looked Egyptian to me, but, alas, my white privilege bubble has resulted in my ignorance: Latinx, pronounced La-teen-ex, is a gender-neutral term sometimes used in lieu of Latina or Latino.  Garcia won her election by 51 percentage points; her district, TX-29, has been only Democrat for the last 9,000 consecutive days.  Garcia has served in the Texas state Senate since 2013.

Jahana Hayes and Ayanna Pressley are the first black women elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, from Connecticut and Massachusetts, respectively.

Hayes won her election by 11 percentage points; her district, CT-5, has been a mix of Republican and Democrat over the last half-century but solely Democrat for the last 4,000 consecutive days.  She has never held elected office.

Pressley won her election by 17 percentage points; her district, MA-7, has been only Democrat for the last 35,000 consecutive days.  Pressley has been a Boston city councilwoman since 2010.

Honorable mention is socialist schoolgirl Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.  She won her election by 64 percentage points; her district, NY-14, has been only Democrat for the last 9,000 consecutive days.  Ocasio-Cortez, who has never held elected office but is expert at standing on tables, assembled her #Squad for selfies on $1,000 iPhones during last week's freshman House orientation. 

Absent from all the "first" enthusiasm was recognition of Marsha Blackburn, as Tennessee's first female U.S. senator (take that, Taylor Swift!), and Kristi Noem, as South Dakota's first female governor.  Both are Republicans, and both beat white dudes; I guess Democrat women don't much care for Republican female firsts.  Plus, who cares about South Dakota and Tennessee?  They have only 14  combined electoral votes. 

What's Next?

With 73-point wins and districts monopolized by Democrats for over 121,000 consecutive days (America as a nation has existed for 88,000 days), I ask, with all sincerity: how is that diverse?  While race, sex, religion, and ethnicity certainly provide for perspectives, why are those perspectives more worthy than, say, a Catholic, heterosexual Caucasian male born in America?  To Democrats, all perspectives are equal, but some are more equal than others.

The belief that certain biological attributes make some superior to others was the justification of the Third Reich's atrocities.  I know that none of the aforementioned newly elected officials is a Nazis. What keeps me up at night is that so many are so fervently willing to cast votes solely on physical characteristics and lifestyle choices.  If you want diversity, strive for excellence, and diversity takes care of itself.  Perhaps some of these new representatives will be excellent, but none was promoted as an excellent achiever.

Lenin must be looking up proudly from Hell; as ambitious as he was, he likely never imagined such rampant useful idiocy in the West.

Rich Logis is host of The Rich Logis Show, at TheRichLogisShow.com, and author of the upcoming book 10 Warning Signs Your Child Is Becoming a Democrat.  He can be found on Twitter at @RichLogis.

Earlier this week, I received an email from Hillary Clinton's 2020 Presidential campaign – er, I mean her political action committee, Onward Together, trumpeting that 19 of the 23 Democrat women elected to the U.S. House of Representatives last week have never held office.

Same day, I stumbled upon this graphic from MoveOn:

Muslims and American Indians and lesbian mothers, oh my!  Halal and gambling for all!

How is any of the "first" traits touted in this graphic a lawmaking skill and qualification?

Despite losing over 900 state elections and 100 national elections in the last decade, I've never vacillated in my belief that Democrats are just flat-out better at selling politics than Republicans are.

The Dishonesty of the Diversity Cult

Donald Trump's glass ceiling-shattering election, as our nation's first true civilian president, was far more historic than Obama's election of our first black president.  But in Trump's case, Republicans weren't motivated to make history the way Obama voters were; they were motivated by fear of a President Clinton.

The sexiness and allure of the "first" this or that is where Democrats have always thrived.  As I discuss in my upcoming book, 10 Warning Signs Your Child Is Becoming a Democrat, Democrats are highly adept at marketing minority status, race, ethnicity, sex, lifestyle choices, and sexual orientation as skills and qualifications.

So just how diverse are the districts and seats they won?  If we define diversity as at least some ideological and electoral balance, then most aren't diverse at all.

The Muslims

Ilhan Omar, of Minnesota, and Rashida Tlaib, of Michigan, are our first Muslim congresswomen.

Omar won her election by 56 percentage points; her district, MN-5, has been represented only by Democrats for the last 20,000 consecutive days.  Before her win, she had served in the Minnesota state House of Representatives.

Tlaib, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America, won by 73 percentage points; her district, MI-13, has been only Democrat for the last 25,500 consecutive days.  Before winning, she had served in the Michigan state House of Representatives.

How, pray tell, does being Muslim make one qualified for political office?  What is the unique skill set brought to the legislative table by virtue of their Islamic faith?  Do they perhaps have some superpowers, given their sex?  Did anyone in the DMIC (Democrat Media Industrial Complex) ever once ask questions like these? 

The American Indians

Sharice Davids, of Kansas, and Deb Haaland, of New Mexico, are our first American Indian congresswomen.

Davids won her election by nine percentage points; her district, KS-3, has been red for 55 of the last 57 years.  Davids has never held elected office.

Haaland won her election by 23 percentage points; her district, NM-1, has been only Democrat for the last 3,500 consecutive days.  She was previously the elected chair of the Democratic Party of New Mexico.

I struggle to see how American Indian genealogy confirms a priori lawmaking erudition.  Perhaps a Democrat reading this can enlighten me.

Gay and Lesbian

Angie Craig won Minnesota's 2nd Congressional District by 5 percentage points in a district that's been only Republican for the last 17 years.  She has never held elected office.

Craig is the first openly lesbian mother to be elected to Congress.  How, I wonder, is being a lesbian mother a skill?  I certainly concur that being a good mother is a skill.  Whether one believes that lesbianism is genetic, or a lifestyle choice, will it produce ideas to increase our economic gains?

Jared Polis, currently a U.S. Representative for Colorado's 2nd Congressional District, is now the Centennial State's first openly gay male elected governor.  I debit some "first" points for being a white guy.  Colorado has had only Democrat governors for the last 4,300 consecutive days.  Openly gay was a crucial résumé-selling point, which got me wondering: what unique advantage will Polis have as his state's chief executive as openly gay, compared to not openly gay?

Blacks and Latina...or Is it Latinx?

Veronica Escobar and Sylvia Garcia are Texas's first Latina congresswomen.

Escobar won her election by 41 percentage points; her district, TX-16, has been only Democrat for the last 19,500 consecutive days.  Escobar, a former elected El Paso County judge, is replacing Robert Francis O'Rourke, whom I refer to as The Beto.  He deserves singular name recognition, à la Oprah, for his oh, so close loss to U.S. Senator Ted Cruz earlier this month.

Garcia has an especial "first" as the first female Latinx.  At first glance, Latinx looked Egyptian to me, but, alas, my white privilege bubble has resulted in my ignorance: Latinx, pronounced La-teen-ex, is a gender-neutral term sometimes used in lieu of Latina or Latino.  Garcia won her election by 51 percentage points; her district, TX-29, has been only Democrat for the last 9,000 consecutive days.  Garcia has served in the Texas state Senate since 2013.

Jahana Hayes and Ayanna Pressley are the first black women elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, from Connecticut and Massachusetts, respectively.

Hayes won her election by 11 percentage points; her district, CT-5, has been a mix of Republican and Democrat over the last half-century but solely Democrat for the last 4,000 consecutive days.  She has never held elected office.

Pressley won her election by 17 percentage points; her district, MA-7, has been only Democrat for the last 35,000 consecutive days.  Pressley has been a Boston city councilwoman since 2010.

Honorable mention is socialist schoolgirl Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.  She won her election by 64 percentage points; her district, NY-14, has been only Democrat for the last 9,000 consecutive days.  Ocasio-Cortez, who has never held elected office but is expert at standing on tables, assembled her #Squad for selfies on $1,000 iPhones during last week's freshman House orientation. 

Absent from all the "first" enthusiasm was recognition of Marsha Blackburn, as Tennessee's first female U.S. senator (take that, Taylor Swift!), and Kristi Noem, as South Dakota's first female governor.  Both are Republicans, and both beat white dudes; I guess Democrat women don't much care for Republican female firsts.  Plus, who cares about South Dakota and Tennessee?  They have only 14  combined electoral votes. 

What's Next?

With 73-point wins and districts monopolized by Democrats for over 121,000 consecutive days (America as a nation has existed for 88,000 days), I ask, with all sincerity: how is that diverse?  While race, sex, religion, and ethnicity certainly provide for perspectives, why are those perspectives more worthy than, say, a Catholic, heterosexual Caucasian male born in America?  To Democrats, all perspectives are equal, but some are more equal than others.

The belief that certain biological attributes make some superior to others was the justification of the Third Reich's atrocities.  I know that none of the aforementioned newly elected officials is a Nazis. What keeps me up at night is that so many are so fervently willing to cast votes solely on physical characteristics and lifestyle choices.  If you want diversity, strive for excellence, and diversity takes care of itself.  Perhaps some of these new representatives will be excellent, but none was promoted as an excellent achiever.

Lenin must be looking up proudly from Hell; as ambitious as he was, he likely never imagined such rampant useful idiocy in the West.

Rich Logis is host of The Rich Logis Show, at TheRichLogisShow.com, and author of the upcoming book 10 Warning Signs Your Child Is Becoming a Democrat.  He can be found on Twitter at @RichLogis.