Justice Kavanaugh: Thank You for Your Courage

I just sent off this letter to Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh:

Your Honor:

I write today to thank you for the extraordinary courage you displayed during the harrowing experience of the last few months as a nominee to be associate justice on the Supreme Court.

In Honor: A History, James Bowman defines honor a "bravery for men, chastity for women," and the need for men to defend their reputation for bravery and the need for women to defend their reputation for chastity.

Clearly in the epic political battle of the last few weeks our Democratic friends have attempted to redefine honor as men having to prove their chastity.  Then they turned around to make a scandal over a man defending his reputation for chastity.  All the time they demanded that woman's chastity be never in question and her mere showing up a proof of courage.  I suspect that the lesson of the whole affair will reduce to the traditional notion: a man must be brave; a woman must be pure, and that is all.

Some have said that you and your family will be broken by this ordeal, your reputation forever tarnished by the vile accusations hurled against you.  But I read a Jewish rabbi last week who said the opposite is true.  Scurrilous attacks against him strengthened his marriage and stiffened his spine.  I hope that may also be true for you, your wife and daughters, and indeed all near and dear to you.

Know, above all, that throughout the land there are millions like me who are today saying our prayers and thanking God for the courage of Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

I have lately coined an aphorism that "there is no such thing as justice, only injustice."  I mean by this that the rage for "justice" is quixotic, in thrall to an illusion that we can create Heaven on Earth.  I protest that all we humans can do is try to make amends for injustice, one case at a time.  I wish you well as you confront the appeals for justice that it will now be your job to adjudicate and hope that you may be able to do some small good for the nation and bind the wounds of those who come before the Court.

Sincerely,

Christopher Chantrill

Today is like the day after a great battle.  We cannot know, as those who were at Gettysburg on the day after that battle, what the full meaning of the great Battle of Kavanaugh will be.  Anyway, today we bury the dead and succor the wounded, and hope that some Abe Lincoln will shortly give a speech that defines this moment forever.

And let me say that one of the wounded is Christine Blasey Ford, the poster girl for the millions of educated white women who have been bewitched by the crazy cult of feminism.

We humans are suckers for crazy cults, for we wish to know the meaning of life, the universe, and everything right now, with a certainty that is not given to mere mortals.  Indeed, I am coming to believe that a part of God's plan is that we should all be chastened from time to time by Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.  It could be that the arc of history, as it bends toward justice, needs to twist itself in knots every now and again.

But we should spare a kind thought for the frenzy of our crazy rich feminists – hey, how about a movie? – who are caught on the horns of a dilemma.  They long to enjoy the manly sports of the public square yet find themselves again and again insisting, commanded by a feeling welling up from deep in the feminine unconscious, that they be protected from harm by manly strength, gentlemanly valor, safe spaces, and that much maligned chap, Daddy.

As for me, all I want is for Justice Kavanaugh to take his place on the Court and become the best justice he can be.  Was it not onetime liberal icon Joseph Campbell, brought to us by liberal icon Bill Moyers, who opined upon The Hero's Journey and how the true hero must descend into the Hell of the Underworld before he can return to society and help fix our problems?

A hero ventures forth from the world of common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man.

I would say that well born educated Millennials doing "activism" and playing at helpless victims and "protesting" against this or that do not count in the Hero narrative.  They are spoiled entitled kids who know not of what they speak.  "Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent."

Christopher Chantrill @chrischantrill runs the go-to site on US government finances, usgovernmentspending.com.  Also get his American Manifesto and his Road to the Middle Class.

I just sent off this letter to Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh:

Your Honor:

I write today to thank you for the extraordinary courage you displayed during the harrowing experience of the last few months as a nominee to be associate justice on the Supreme Court.

In Honor: A History, James Bowman defines honor a "bravery for men, chastity for women," and the need for men to defend their reputation for bravery and the need for women to defend their reputation for chastity.

Clearly in the epic political battle of the last few weeks our Democratic friends have attempted to redefine honor as men having to prove their chastity.  Then they turned around to make a scandal over a man defending his reputation for chastity.  All the time they demanded that woman's chastity be never in question and her mere showing up a proof of courage.  I suspect that the lesson of the whole affair will reduce to the traditional notion: a man must be brave; a woman must be pure, and that is all.

Some have said that you and your family will be broken by this ordeal, your reputation forever tarnished by the vile accusations hurled against you.  But I read a Jewish rabbi last week who said the opposite is true.  Scurrilous attacks against him strengthened his marriage and stiffened his spine.  I hope that may also be true for you, your wife and daughters, and indeed all near and dear to you.

Know, above all, that throughout the land there are millions like me who are today saying our prayers and thanking God for the courage of Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

I have lately coined an aphorism that "there is no such thing as justice, only injustice."  I mean by this that the rage for "justice" is quixotic, in thrall to an illusion that we can create Heaven on Earth.  I protest that all we humans can do is try to make amends for injustice, one case at a time.  I wish you well as you confront the appeals for justice that it will now be your job to adjudicate and hope that you may be able to do some small good for the nation and bind the wounds of those who come before the Court.

Sincerely,

Christopher Chantrill

Today is like the day after a great battle.  We cannot know, as those who were at Gettysburg on the day after that battle, what the full meaning of the great Battle of Kavanaugh will be.  Anyway, today we bury the dead and succor the wounded, and hope that some Abe Lincoln will shortly give a speech that defines this moment forever.

And let me say that one of the wounded is Christine Blasey Ford, the poster girl for the millions of educated white women who have been bewitched by the crazy cult of feminism.

We humans are suckers for crazy cults, for we wish to know the meaning of life, the universe, and everything right now, with a certainty that is not given to mere mortals.  Indeed, I am coming to believe that a part of God's plan is that we should all be chastened from time to time by Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.  It could be that the arc of history, as it bends toward justice, needs to twist itself in knots every now and again.

But we should spare a kind thought for the frenzy of our crazy rich feminists – hey, how about a movie? – who are caught on the horns of a dilemma.  They long to enjoy the manly sports of the public square yet find themselves again and again insisting, commanded by a feeling welling up from deep in the feminine unconscious, that they be protected from harm by manly strength, gentlemanly valor, safe spaces, and that much maligned chap, Daddy.

As for me, all I want is for Justice Kavanaugh to take his place on the Court and become the best justice he can be.  Was it not onetime liberal icon Joseph Campbell, brought to us by liberal icon Bill Moyers, who opined upon The Hero's Journey and how the true hero must descend into the Hell of the Underworld before he can return to society and help fix our problems?

A hero ventures forth from the world of common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man.

I would say that well born educated Millennials doing "activism" and playing at helpless victims and "protesting" against this or that do not count in the Hero narrative.  They are spoiled entitled kids who know not of what they speak.  "Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent."

Christopher Chantrill @chrischantrill runs the go-to site on US government finances, usgovernmentspending.com.  Also get his American Manifesto and his Road to the Middle Class.