Martin Luther King Believed in the Civil Rights of the Unborn

In a week bookended by Martin Luther King Day and the 45th Annual March for Life, few liberals would see the connection between the two.  Yet as King's niece, Alveda King, points out, were he alive today, Martin Luther King would lead the March for Life and fight for the civil rights of the unborn.

Martin Luther King would be leading the charge for the repeal of the wrongly decided Roe V. Wade, a decision no more rooted in moral law than was the Dred Scott decision.  Whether defined as three fifths of a human being or not a human being at all, all are fully human in the eyes of the Creator, who endowed all with the inalienable right to life.  The Supreme Court occasionally gets things wrong, and in both these cases, it did.  As his niece notes, Martin Luther King, Jr. would say that not only do black lives matter, but all lives matter and that unborn lives matter:

Alveda King, director of [c]ivil [r]ights for the [u]nborn for Priests for Life, said her uncle's words show his commitment to respect for life.

"He said the [n]egro cannot win if he is willing to sacrifice the futures of his children for immediate personal comfort and safety," King said.  "Abortion, of course, forces us to do exactly that."

Alveda King admits to having had two abortions, because, like Rev. King's wife, Coretta Scott King, she had once fallen for the lies of Planned Parenthood:

Martin Luther King[,] Jr.'s widow, Coretta Scott King, received an award from Planned Parenthood in 1996 on behalf of her husband, but Alveda King says she knows [that] her uncle would not have believed in the mission of Planned Parenthood:

His wife accepted that in his stead, because she was like me, she had accepted that agenda without understanding, I believe, but my uncle would have been very pro-life today.

... "I really believe that if my uncle were here today, he would encourage us to find solutions to the problems, even women's problems, and all problems, without having to do violence to babies in the womb. I am just convinced that he would agree with that," she said.

As Alveda King points out, Dr. King was clearly committed to the civil rights of the unborn and viewed the killing of the unborn as immoral.  He observed that one could not be for the civil rights of black Americans while supporting the abortion of their children:

My birthday is January 22, and each year, this day is marred by the fact that it is the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, and the anniversary of death for millions of babies.  I and my deceased children are victims of abortion, and subsequently the Roe v. Wade decision has adversely affected the lives of my entire family.  I pray often for deliverance from the pain caused by my decision to abort my baby.  I suffered the threat of cervical and breast cancer, and experienced the pain of empty arms after the baby was gone.  And truly, for me, and countless abortive mothers, nothing on [E]arth can fully restore what has been lost, only Jesus can.

My grandfather, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr., once said, "No one is going to kill a child of mine."  Tragically, two of his grandchildren had already been aborted when he saved the life of his next great[] grandson with this statement. ... How can the "Dream" survive if we murder the children?  Every aborted baby is like a slave in the womb of his or her mother.  The mother decides his or her fate.

Back in March of 2009, future 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton accepted Planned Parenthood's Margaret Sanger Award – this from an organization originally called the American Birth Control League.  In accepting the award, the Weekly Standard noted, Hillary had high praise for Sanger, a noted eugenicist:

Now, I have to tell you that it was a great privilege when I was told that I would receive this award.  I admire Margaret Sanger enormously, her courage, her tenacity, her vision[.] ... And when I think about what she did all those years ago in Brooklyn, taking on archetypes, taking on attitudes and accusations flowing from all directions, I am really in awe of her.

As J. Kenneth Blackwell, writing in the Washington Times, notes, those who chant "black lives matter" obviously exclude the abortion rate of black babies – a death rate that Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger and the KKK could only dream of:

[One hundred thirty-eight thousand five hundred thirty-nine] black babies, nearly one baby in three, were killed in the womb in 2010.  According to the CDC, between 2007 and 2010, innocent black babies were victimized in nearly 36 percent of the abortion deaths in the United States, though blacks represent only 12.8 percent of the population.  Some say the abortion capital of America is New York City.  According to LifeSiteNews, the city's Department of Health reported that in 2012, more black babies were aborted (31,328) than born (24,758).  That's 55.9 percent of black babies killed before birth.  Blacks represented 42.4 percent of all abortions.

This is a disturbing and tragic situation that continues unabated and is the fulfillment of the dream of Hillary Clinton's heroine, Margaret Sanger.

One of the things that scares liberals to death and one of the things at stake in the elections of 2018 and 2020 is that President Trump will get to appoint justices who will overturn Roe v. Wade, just as Dred Scott was cast on the ash heap of judicial history.

As Investor's Business Daily editorialized when Texas passed a late-term abortion ban, the humanity of the unborn was grudgingly acknowledged even by one of the majority in Roe v. Wade:

The 20-week benchmark wasn't pulled out of a hat.  The respected University of Utah expert Maureen Condic recently testified before Congress that at 20 weeks a fetus can feel pain and has "an increase in stress hormones in response to painful experiences" along with other reactions that "reflect a mature, bodywide response to pain."  It is her view that fetuses "deserve the benefit of the doubt regarding their experience of pain and protection from cruelty under the law."

The public would seem to agree, as the advent and advances of ultrasound have largely shredded the "clump of cells" argument of abortion proponents.  A University of Texas[-]Texas Tribune poll found 62% of people support the ban.  Nationwide, even a recent Huffington Post[-]YouGov poll found that 59% support an abortion ban after 20 weeks.  A Gallup poll late last year found that 64% think abortion should be illegal after 12 weeks[.] ...

Thanks to medical science, the time it takes for a baby in the womb to become viable is shrinking.  It's been said that if the Supreme Court in 1973 had seen ultrasound pictures of the unborn, as is routinely done today, Roe v. Wade would have been decided quite differently.

Indeed, writing the majority opinion back then, Justice Harry Blackmun said: "We need not resolve the difficult question of when life begins."

He also wrote that if the unborn [human] life was proved to be a person, "the appellant's case, of course, collapses, for the fetus'[s] right to life is then guaranteed."

We may be only one or two more Supreme Court justices away from the fetus's right to life being guaranteed in law.  When President Trump, the first president to address the March for Life through a live video feed, issued an executive order restoring the Mexico City policy on funding of organizations that provide abortions, we got a clear message on his view of the humanity of the unborn.

President Donald Trump and the Rev. Martin Luther King would agree.  

Daniel John Sobieski is a freelance writer whose pieces have appeared in Investor's Business Daily, Human Events, Reason Magazine, and the Chicago Sun-Times among other publications.

In a week bookended by Martin Luther King Day and the 45th Annual March for Life, few liberals would see the connection between the two.  Yet as King's niece, Alveda King, points out, were he alive today, Martin Luther King would lead the March for Life and fight for the civil rights of the unborn.

Martin Luther King would be leading the charge for the repeal of the wrongly decided Roe V. Wade, a decision no more rooted in moral law than was the Dred Scott decision.  Whether defined as three fifths of a human being or not a human being at all, all are fully human in the eyes of the Creator, who endowed all with the inalienable right to life.  The Supreme Court occasionally gets things wrong, and in both these cases, it did.  As his niece notes, Martin Luther King, Jr. would say that not only do black lives matter, but all lives matter and that unborn lives matter:

Alveda King, director of [c]ivil [r]ights for the [u]nborn for Priests for Life, said her uncle's words show his commitment to respect for life.

"He said the [n]egro cannot win if he is willing to sacrifice the futures of his children for immediate personal comfort and safety," King said.  "Abortion, of course, forces us to do exactly that."

Alveda King admits to having had two abortions, because, like Rev. King's wife, Coretta Scott King, she had once fallen for the lies of Planned Parenthood:

Martin Luther King[,] Jr.'s widow, Coretta Scott King, received an award from Planned Parenthood in 1996 on behalf of her husband, but Alveda King says she knows [that] her uncle would not have believed in the mission of Planned Parenthood:

His wife accepted that in his stead, because she was like me, she had accepted that agenda without understanding, I believe, but my uncle would have been very pro-life today.

... "I really believe that if my uncle were here today, he would encourage us to find solutions to the problems, even women's problems, and all problems, without having to do violence to babies in the womb. I am just convinced that he would agree with that," she said.

As Alveda King points out, Dr. King was clearly committed to the civil rights of the unborn and viewed the killing of the unborn as immoral.  He observed that one could not be for the civil rights of black Americans while supporting the abortion of their children:

My birthday is January 22, and each year, this day is marred by the fact that it is the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, and the anniversary of death for millions of babies.  I and my deceased children are victims of abortion, and subsequently the Roe v. Wade decision has adversely affected the lives of my entire family.  I pray often for deliverance from the pain caused by my decision to abort my baby.  I suffered the threat of cervical and breast cancer, and experienced the pain of empty arms after the baby was gone.  And truly, for me, and countless abortive mothers, nothing on [E]arth can fully restore what has been lost, only Jesus can.

My grandfather, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr., once said, "No one is going to kill a child of mine."  Tragically, two of his grandchildren had already been aborted when he saved the life of his next great[] grandson with this statement. ... How can the "Dream" survive if we murder the children?  Every aborted baby is like a slave in the womb of his or her mother.  The mother decides his or her fate.

Back in March of 2009, future 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton accepted Planned Parenthood's Margaret Sanger Award – this from an organization originally called the American Birth Control League.  In accepting the award, the Weekly Standard noted, Hillary had high praise for Sanger, a noted eugenicist:

Now, I have to tell you that it was a great privilege when I was told that I would receive this award.  I admire Margaret Sanger enormously, her courage, her tenacity, her vision[.] ... And when I think about what she did all those years ago in Brooklyn, taking on archetypes, taking on attitudes and accusations flowing from all directions, I am really in awe of her.

As J. Kenneth Blackwell, writing in the Washington Times, notes, those who chant "black lives matter" obviously exclude the abortion rate of black babies – a death rate that Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger and the KKK could only dream of:

[One hundred thirty-eight thousand five hundred thirty-nine] black babies, nearly one baby in three, were killed in the womb in 2010.  According to the CDC, between 2007 and 2010, innocent black babies were victimized in nearly 36 percent of the abortion deaths in the United States, though blacks represent only 12.8 percent of the population.  Some say the abortion capital of America is New York City.  According to LifeSiteNews, the city's Department of Health reported that in 2012, more black babies were aborted (31,328) than born (24,758).  That's 55.9 percent of black babies killed before birth.  Blacks represented 42.4 percent of all abortions.

This is a disturbing and tragic situation that continues unabated and is the fulfillment of the dream of Hillary Clinton's heroine, Margaret Sanger.

One of the things that scares liberals to death and one of the things at stake in the elections of 2018 and 2020 is that President Trump will get to appoint justices who will overturn Roe v. Wade, just as Dred Scott was cast on the ash heap of judicial history.

As Investor's Business Daily editorialized when Texas passed a late-term abortion ban, the humanity of the unborn was grudgingly acknowledged even by one of the majority in Roe v. Wade:

The 20-week benchmark wasn't pulled out of a hat.  The respected University of Utah expert Maureen Condic recently testified before Congress that at 20 weeks a fetus can feel pain and has "an increase in stress hormones in response to painful experiences" along with other reactions that "reflect a mature, bodywide response to pain."  It is her view that fetuses "deserve the benefit of the doubt regarding their experience of pain and protection from cruelty under the law."

The public would seem to agree, as the advent and advances of ultrasound have largely shredded the "clump of cells" argument of abortion proponents.  A University of Texas[-]Texas Tribune poll found 62% of people support the ban.  Nationwide, even a recent Huffington Post[-]YouGov poll found that 59% support an abortion ban after 20 weeks.  A Gallup poll late last year found that 64% think abortion should be illegal after 12 weeks[.] ...

Thanks to medical science, the time it takes for a baby in the womb to become viable is shrinking.  It's been said that if the Supreme Court in 1973 had seen ultrasound pictures of the unborn, as is routinely done today, Roe v. Wade would have been decided quite differently.

Indeed, writing the majority opinion back then, Justice Harry Blackmun said: "We need not resolve the difficult question of when life begins."

He also wrote that if the unborn [human] life was proved to be a person, "the appellant's case, of course, collapses, for the fetus'[s] right to life is then guaranteed."

We may be only one or two more Supreme Court justices away from the fetus's right to life being guaranteed in law.  When President Trump, the first president to address the March for Life through a live video feed, issued an executive order restoring the Mexico City policy on funding of organizations that provide abortions, we got a clear message on his view of the humanity of the unborn.

President Donald Trump and the Rev. Martin Luther King would agree.  

Daniel John Sobieski is a freelance writer whose pieces have appeared in Investor's Business Daily, Human Events, Reason Magazine, and the Chicago Sun-Times among other publications.