Valdosta, Georgia -- a racial powder keg?

What could be worse than having infamous Hollywood filmmaker Michael Moore target you with one of his faux documentaries? How about becoming the target of a surreal, unending federal investigation conducted by U. S. attorney for the Middle District of Georgia, Michael J. Moore, when you're only a sophomore in high school?

A really bad Michael Moore film might seem like it lasts for an eternity. In contrast, Michael J. Moore and the Department of Justice have the power to put people in prison for life, or at minimum leave an individual to roast indefinitely in the spotlight, while being tried and convicted in the court of public opinion.

On January 11th, 2013, the body of high school sophomore Kendrick Johnson was found in a rolled-up wrestling mat inside the Lowndes County High School gymnasium, the day after he disappeared on campus during school hours. Investigators concluded that Johnson had fallen head-first in the upright mat and died of positional asphyxiation. Two coroners independently declared Johnson's death was accidental.

However, the tragedy occurred about a month before the first anniversary of the Trayvon Martin fiasco. Rumors began going around among the gossiping teenagers at the school suggesting that Johnson's death was actually the result of foul play.

The family of Kendrick Johnson latched onto the rumors and accused young Brian Bell of murdering their son, in spite of the following facts:

  1. Kendrick Johnson’s death was investigated by the Lowndes County Sheriff's Department, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, and the FBI. All three agencies officially ruled Johnson's death was accidental, not murder, based on the results of their independent investigations.
  2. Even if the death had been determined to be a homicide, investigators concluded that Brian Bell could not possibly have committed a crime, because video evidence clearly accounted for his whereabouts throughout the day.
  3. Brian Bell was only a fifteen-year-old teenager at the time.
  4. His older brother Branden, also targeted at one point by the FBI because of the rumor mill, was not even in Valdosta at the time of Kendrick Johnson’s death.

Despite having no evidence to support their allegations, the parents of Kendrick Johnson filed a wrongful death lawsuit for $100 million dollars naming the city of Valdosta, the Bell family, and various law enforcement officials as defendants in the case. Dissatisfied with the official cause of death, the family hired Dr. William Andrews, who concluded after his autopsy that Johnson had died from a heart attack caused by a single blow to the back of his neck.  Did this mean Johnson’s hypothetical murderer was a Ninja?

Long time local civil rights activist Reverend Floyd Rose looked at all the evidence and declared Johnson's death was an accident. Former local NAACP chapter president Leigh Touchton investigated as well, saying "accusations of a cover-up were not substantiated by fact."

Al Sharpton briefly sniffed around, but even he couldn’t find anything of substance that offered a profit to his National Action Network.

About the only person who did see something in the Johnson’s claims was U. S. Attorney Michael J. Moore. After the GBI, the FBI, and the Lowndes County Sheriff’s office all concluded their investigations by saying Johnson’s death was accidental, Moore opened a federal investigation that he refuses to close.

When asked point blank by a reporter if there was any way possible that Kendrick Johnson's death was a homicide, the chief medical examiner of the state of Georgia said, "No, there is not."

Perhaps Kendrick Johnson's family sincerely believes that a widespread conspiracy involving nearly forty people (the litigants in the $100 million dollar lawsuit) have covered up for their son's murder, in spite of overwhelming evidence to the contrary. A more cynical person might think they have one hundred million reasons to perpetuate the myth, until their payday arrives.

The Johnsons hired "civil rights" attorney Benjamin Crump, famous for representing the families of both Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown.  Given the fact that public relations expert Ryan Julison's name surfaced in connection with both Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, it isn't difficult to wonder if his fingerprints are on this slickly produced video that completely misrepresents the clearly known facts in the case -- Branden Bell wasn't even in Valdosta when Kendrick Johnson made that last fateful trip into the gym.  The video insinuates that FBI agent Rick Bell is a racist, corrupt agent, when in reality his track record reflects just the opposite. 

Although video evidence completely exonerated Brian Bell as a possible suspect for any sort of involvement with Kendrick Johnson's accidental death, Johnson's family and friends perpetuated a nonstop campaign on social media that culminated in Florida State University rescinding Bell's football scholarship offer only the day before signing day for national letters of intent.

The Johnson family has been relentless with their efforts seemingly to foment racial tension, even going so far to compare Kendrick's death to the horrific murder of Emmett Till, which is totally absurd.

Nevertheless, racial tensions have deteriorated considerably within the community and spilled onto the campus of Valdosta State University, where recently a handful of black protestors trampled on the American flag, claiming it was "a symbol of our protest. When a slave understands his situation and understands he doesn't want to be in slavery, he does not respect or revere anything his slave master has put before him." 

Now, South Georgia is nothing like Northern California. In other words, Valdosta State is nothing like Berkeley.

True, an Air Force veteran was arrested by campus police after snatching the flag from the protestors, but no charges were filed against her.  An arrest warrant has been issued for one of the flag stomping protestors, however, after a gun was found in a backpack that he left on campus. 

Many of the people who live in Valdosta are very patriotic Americans, so when news spread of the students marching on the American flag, the word spread that a counter protest would descend on campus Friday in support of the flag, classes were cancelled. More than a thousand people participated (in a city of only fifty-six thousand).

Speaking of arrest warrants, one has finally been issued in the Kendrick Johnson case -- but for Dalton Ray Chauncey, a student from the school who falsely claimed that he'd overheard two other students discussing their involvement in Kendrick Johnson's death.

In a somewhat related development, yet another arrest warrant has been issued for Ervin Robinson, who reportedly shot Kendrick Johnson's sister early on the morning of April 20th. One must wonder if it is only a matter of time before Johnson's family claims that Robinson is being framed.

What could be worse than having infamous Hollywood filmmaker Michael Moore target you with one of his faux documentaries? How about becoming the target of a surreal, unending federal investigation conducted by U. S. attorney for the Middle District of Georgia, Michael J. Moore, when you're only a sophomore in high school?

A really bad Michael Moore film might seem like it lasts for an eternity. In contrast, Michael J. Moore and the Department of Justice have the power to put people in prison for life, or at minimum leave an individual to roast indefinitely in the spotlight, while being tried and convicted in the court of public opinion.

On January 11th, 2013, the body of high school sophomore Kendrick Johnson was found in a rolled-up wrestling mat inside the Lowndes County High School gymnasium, the day after he disappeared on campus during school hours. Investigators concluded that Johnson had fallen head-first in the upright mat and died of positional asphyxiation. Two coroners independently declared Johnson's death was accidental.

However, the tragedy occurred about a month before the first anniversary of the Trayvon Martin fiasco. Rumors began going around among the gossiping teenagers at the school suggesting that Johnson's death was actually the result of foul play.

The family of Kendrick Johnson latched onto the rumors and accused young Brian Bell of murdering their son, in spite of the following facts:

  1. Kendrick Johnson’s death was investigated by the Lowndes County Sheriff's Department, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, and the FBI. All three agencies officially ruled Johnson's death was accidental, not murder, based on the results of their independent investigations.
  2. Even if the death had been determined to be a homicide, investigators concluded that Brian Bell could not possibly have committed a crime, because video evidence clearly accounted for his whereabouts throughout the day.
  3. Brian Bell was only a fifteen-year-old teenager at the time.
  4. His older brother Branden, also targeted at one point by the FBI because of the rumor mill, was not even in Valdosta at the time of Kendrick Johnson’s death.

Despite having no evidence to support their allegations, the parents of Kendrick Johnson filed a wrongful death lawsuit for $100 million dollars naming the city of Valdosta, the Bell family, and various law enforcement officials as defendants in the case. Dissatisfied with the official cause of death, the family hired Dr. William Andrews, who concluded after his autopsy that Johnson had died from a heart attack caused by a single blow to the back of his neck.  Did this mean Johnson’s hypothetical murderer was a Ninja?

Long time local civil rights activist Reverend Floyd Rose looked at all the evidence and declared Johnson's death was an accident. Former local NAACP chapter president Leigh Touchton investigated as well, saying "accusations of a cover-up were not substantiated by fact."

Al Sharpton briefly sniffed around, but even he couldn’t find anything of substance that offered a profit to his National Action Network.

About the only person who did see something in the Johnson’s claims was U. S. Attorney Michael J. Moore. After the GBI, the FBI, and the Lowndes County Sheriff’s office all concluded their investigations by saying Johnson’s death was accidental, Moore opened a federal investigation that he refuses to close.

When asked point blank by a reporter if there was any way possible that Kendrick Johnson's death was a homicide, the chief medical examiner of the state of Georgia said, "No, there is not."

Perhaps Kendrick Johnson's family sincerely believes that a widespread conspiracy involving nearly forty people (the litigants in the $100 million dollar lawsuit) have covered up for their son's murder, in spite of overwhelming evidence to the contrary. A more cynical person might think they have one hundred million reasons to perpetuate the myth, until their payday arrives.

The Johnsons hired "civil rights" attorney Benjamin Crump, famous for representing the families of both Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown.  Given the fact that public relations expert Ryan Julison's name surfaced in connection with both Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, it isn't difficult to wonder if his fingerprints are on this slickly produced video that completely misrepresents the clearly known facts in the case -- Branden Bell wasn't even in Valdosta when Kendrick Johnson made that last fateful trip into the gym.  The video insinuates that FBI agent Rick Bell is a racist, corrupt agent, when in reality his track record reflects just the opposite. 

Although video evidence completely exonerated Brian Bell as a possible suspect for any sort of involvement with Kendrick Johnson's accidental death, Johnson's family and friends perpetuated a nonstop campaign on social media that culminated in Florida State University rescinding Bell's football scholarship offer only the day before signing day for national letters of intent.

The Johnson family has been relentless with their efforts seemingly to foment racial tension, even going so far to compare Kendrick's death to the horrific murder of Emmett Till, which is totally absurd.

Nevertheless, racial tensions have deteriorated considerably within the community and spilled onto the campus of Valdosta State University, where recently a handful of black protestors trampled on the American flag, claiming it was "a symbol of our protest. When a slave understands his situation and understands he doesn't want to be in slavery, he does not respect or revere anything his slave master has put before him." 

Now, South Georgia is nothing like Northern California. In other words, Valdosta State is nothing like Berkeley.

True, an Air Force veteran was arrested by campus police after snatching the flag from the protestors, but no charges were filed against her.  An arrest warrant has been issued for one of the flag stomping protestors, however, after a gun was found in a backpack that he left on campus. 

Many of the people who live in Valdosta are very patriotic Americans, so when news spread of the students marching on the American flag, the word spread that a counter protest would descend on campus Friday in support of the flag, classes were cancelled. More than a thousand people participated (in a city of only fifty-six thousand).

Speaking of arrest warrants, one has finally been issued in the Kendrick Johnson case -- but for Dalton Ray Chauncey, a student from the school who falsely claimed that he'd overheard two other students discussing their involvement in Kendrick Johnson's death.

In a somewhat related development, yet another arrest warrant has been issued for Ervin Robinson, who reportedly shot Kendrick Johnson's sister early on the morning of April 20th. One must wonder if it is only a matter of time before Johnson's family claims that Robinson is being framed.