Black Man Saves White Woman from Black Mob Violence in Memphis

The best explanation for black mob violence just might come from a place where it is an everyday fact of life: Memphis.

“It’s fun,” said one black person to a local reporter inquiring about why so many “teens” are so eager to be so violent.

But the central organizing feature of the violence is not age. It is race. The members of these mobs are black.

That goes for Memphis, Louisville, Indianapolis, and the hundreds of other cities big and small where black mob violence has resisted every other explanation. And solution.

The latest case in Memphis happened this week in a convenience store, caught on video.

 

 

A grey-haired white woman was paying for gas when she looked outside and saw almost 100 black people milling around, threatening and fighting.

She asked a black man, Orrden Williams, for help: Would he walk her to her car?    Of course, he said.

And off they went, into a sea of “unruly teenagers,” as the local press likes to call large groups of black people.

The video shows Williams making sure she gets to her car safely.

That is when the crowd turned on him. First with a punch to the head from behind. Then with dozens of black people chasing, surrounding, punching, knocking him down, and kicking him.

“This was a terrorist act, “Williams told the NBC affiliate in Memphis. “We have a civilized society with no place for this.”

“Teenagers” in Memphis hear that a lot: After every episode of black mob violence.

In September 2014, hundreds of black people rampaged through the parking lot of a Kroger grocery store, destroying property and attacking clerks. On the video that went viral, the videographer exclaims with glee: “Hold on, they got a white dude,” she said. “They are going to fight. They are going to jack. They got a white dude.”

The violence was an assault, not a fight, that left one white clerk unconscious outside the store.

The night before, the daughter of a local talk show host witnessed a mob attack at a local carnival. The culprits? Large groups of black people. The incident never made the local press.

Within a month “the teens attack again,” said a reporter at the Channel 10 news station in October “This time the scene was caught on camera inside a Memphis apartment complex. Caught in the fight were a woman in a wheelchair and a months old baby.”

Also in October, the local News 3 station declared Memphis was experiencing a “rash of mob violence lately,” so it sought out of the miscreants to find out what was behind it and “what can stop it. Their answer: Nothing.”

“The Kroger attack? That’s what kids do,” said one black person to the station. “It’s fun. But to be honest, police make you want to do it.”

They must be having lots of fun because the videos of black mob violence and black on white crime are mounting up.

Colin Flaherty, author of two books on black mob violence, both featuring Memphis, keeps a video playlist on YouTube of the Memphis racial mayhem.

“From schools to skating rinks to gas stations to grocery stores, Memphis is a mess,” said Flaherty, author of the Amazon #1 Best Seller, Don’t Make the Black Kids Angry. “Even with all the recent videos, these represent just the tip of the iceberg of all the black mob violence and black on white crime in Memphis. There’s also a huge problem for tourists and locals near the entertainment district at Beale Street, where more than one white person has parked their car just a bit too far from the clubs and they never made it back.”

Flaherty’s newest book, Don’t Make the Black Kids Angry: The hoax of black victimization, features several stories from Memphis.  “Every day we read about how black people are relentless victims of relentless white racism, all the time, everywhere and that explains everything,” Flaherty said. “The latest example of this is the shooting in North Charleston. But these videos from Memphis — and all over the country — reveal that to be a myth. The greatest lie of our generation. And thanks to these videos and news stories, more and more people are starting to figure that out.”

Willie Shields is a talk show host at WVLT in Vineland, New Jersey.

The best explanation for black mob violence just might come from a place where it is an everyday fact of life: Memphis.

“It’s fun,” said one black person to a local reporter inquiring about why so many “teens” are so eager to be so violent.

But the central organizing feature of the violence is not age. It is race. The members of these mobs are black.

That goes for Memphis, Louisville, Indianapolis, and the hundreds of other cities big and small where black mob violence has resisted every other explanation. And solution.

The latest case in Memphis happened this week in a convenience store, caught on video.

 

 

A grey-haired white woman was paying for gas when she looked outside and saw almost 100 black people milling around, threatening and fighting.

She asked a black man, Orrden Williams, for help: Would he walk her to her car?    Of course, he said.

And off they went, into a sea of “unruly teenagers,” as the local press likes to call large groups of black people.

The video shows Williams making sure she gets to her car safely.

That is when the crowd turned on him. First with a punch to the head from behind. Then with dozens of black people chasing, surrounding, punching, knocking him down, and kicking him.

“This was a terrorist act, “Williams told the NBC affiliate in Memphis. “We have a civilized society with no place for this.”

“Teenagers” in Memphis hear that a lot: After every episode of black mob violence.

In September 2014, hundreds of black people rampaged through the parking lot of a Kroger grocery store, destroying property and attacking clerks. On the video that went viral, the videographer exclaims with glee: “Hold on, they got a white dude,” she said. “They are going to fight. They are going to jack. They got a white dude.”

The violence was an assault, not a fight, that left one white clerk unconscious outside the store.

The night before, the daughter of a local talk show host witnessed a mob attack at a local carnival. The culprits? Large groups of black people. The incident never made the local press.

Within a month “the teens attack again,” said a reporter at the Channel 10 news station in October “This time the scene was caught on camera inside a Memphis apartment complex. Caught in the fight were a woman in a wheelchair and a months old baby.”

Also in October, the local News 3 station declared Memphis was experiencing a “rash of mob violence lately,” so it sought out of the miscreants to find out what was behind it and “what can stop it. Their answer: Nothing.”

“The Kroger attack? That’s what kids do,” said one black person to the station. “It’s fun. But to be honest, police make you want to do it.”

They must be having lots of fun because the videos of black mob violence and black on white crime are mounting up.

Colin Flaherty, author of two books on black mob violence, both featuring Memphis, keeps a video playlist on YouTube of the Memphis racial mayhem.

“From schools to skating rinks to gas stations to grocery stores, Memphis is a mess,” said Flaherty, author of the Amazon #1 Best Seller, Don’t Make the Black Kids Angry. “Even with all the recent videos, these represent just the tip of the iceberg of all the black mob violence and black on white crime in Memphis. There’s also a huge problem for tourists and locals near the entertainment district at Beale Street, where more than one white person has parked their car just a bit too far from the clubs and they never made it back.”

Flaherty’s newest book, Don’t Make the Black Kids Angry: The hoax of black victimization, features several stories from Memphis.  “Every day we read about how black people are relentless victims of relentless white racism, all the time, everywhere and that explains everything,” Flaherty said. “The latest example of this is the shooting in North Charleston. But these videos from Memphis — and all over the country — reveal that to be a myth. The greatest lie of our generation. And thanks to these videos and news stories, more and more people are starting to figure that out.”

Willie Shields is a talk show host at WVLT in Vineland, New Jersey.