Trump's vulgarity masks an important truth about immigration

Another day, another pathetic episode of mainstream media meltdown.  President Trump did the unthinkable.  Once again, he dared to speak the truth: why should the United States be a dumping ground for millions of people from "s-hole" countries?  And another undeniable truth?  The majority of people arriving in America today are from third-world countries.  Upon their arrival, most are unemployable, and they speak little to no English.  Some are illiterate – they can't read, nor can they even write their own languages.  In most major American cities, there are burgeoning immigrant enclaves populated by foreigners who have absolutely no intention of ever assimilating into the American culture.  And while the Democrats and their leftist media enablers continue to feign outrage and indignation over Trump's spoken truism, one overarching fact remains: the U.S. immigration system is broken.

It's been hopelessly broken for many decades and has spiraled out of control, since President Herbert Hoover proposed quotas for people wishing to immigrate to America.  It was an Act of Congress, approved May 26, 1924, titled "An Act to limit the immigration of aliens into the United States."  The legislation was for the specific purpose of limiting the number of aliens in the United States.  Hoover was a Republican.  One of his successors, Harry S. Truman, a Democrat, struggled with the influx of Mexican farm-workers and in 1950 set up the Commission on Migratory Labor to look into illegal migration of foreign workers into the U.S.  In 1951, Truman signed legislation permitting a specified number of legal migrants to harvest crops in the U.S.  It was Truman who said, "Everyone suffers from the presence of these illegal immigrants in the community."  Both Hoover and Truman would be labeled heinous, bigoted racists or worse by current-day Democrats.

Truman's successor, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, initiated "Operation Wetback" in a coordinated effort between the U.S. Border Patrol and the military to physically locate and then deport illegal aliens in 1954.  It's estimated that 1.3 million illegals were deported or left voluntarily.  The overwhelming majority of illegals returned to Mexico, most of whom were residing in the U.S. Southwest.  Eisenhower said in his 1953 State of the Union address, "It is a manifest right of our [g]overnment to limit the number of immigrants our [n]ation can absorb.  It is also a manifest right of our [g]overnment to set reasonable requirements on the character and the numbers of the people who come to share our land and our freedom."  President Trump simply reiterated Eisenhower's words, in perhaps a more blunt, but certainly a truthful manner of speaking.  What do Hoover, Truman, Eisenhower, and Trump all have in common?  The knowledge that unfettered illegal immigration is an overwhelming financial strain and a cumbersome burden on American society as a whole and that it cannot be sustained in perpetuity.

In contrast to his immediate predecessors, candidate Donald Trump willingly embraced the issue of illegal immigration during his campaign.  Furthermore, as president, Trump has vowed to resolve and finally fix the problematic issues of chain migration and lax government oversight of foreigners issued work visas; cap the number of qualified refugees; eliminate the "diversity" lottery; and end the DACA program, the unconstitutional amnesty program implemented by Barack Obama without the legislative approval of Congress.  President Trump is also determined to oversee the building of a border wall between Mexico and the United States.  No other president in modern history has attempted to take on such an enormous task.  Instead, President Trump has been called numerous insulting and slanderous adjectives, in addition to beating back activist judges, who have attempted repeatedly to thwart his resolve to fix a broken immigration system.

Maybe it's time to examine the immigration laws of other first-world countries and adopt a sensible national policy, modeling laws that are working in countries such as Australia.  I've taken the time to research and study their immigration policies.  One thing is for certain: the immigration laws in Australia are equitable and fair; the laws are strictly enforced; and, more importantly, there is no such thing as illegally immigrating to Australia.  Legal immigration has a single purpose: to benefit the nation.  The same can't be said in America. 

Another day, another pathetic episode of mainstream media meltdown.  President Trump did the unthinkable.  Once again, he dared to speak the truth: why should the United States be a dumping ground for millions of people from "s-hole" countries?  And another undeniable truth?  The majority of people arriving in America today are from third-world countries.  Upon their arrival, most are unemployable, and they speak little to no English.  Some are illiterate – they can't read, nor can they even write their own languages.  In most major American cities, there are burgeoning immigrant enclaves populated by foreigners who have absolutely no intention of ever assimilating into the American culture.  And while the Democrats and their leftist media enablers continue to feign outrage and indignation over Trump's spoken truism, one overarching fact remains: the U.S. immigration system is broken.

It's been hopelessly broken for many decades and has spiraled out of control, since President Herbert Hoover proposed quotas for people wishing to immigrate to America.  It was an Act of Congress, approved May 26, 1924, titled "An Act to limit the immigration of aliens into the United States."  The legislation was for the specific purpose of limiting the number of aliens in the United States.  Hoover was a Republican.  One of his successors, Harry S. Truman, a Democrat, struggled with the influx of Mexican farm-workers and in 1950 set up the Commission on Migratory Labor to look into illegal migration of foreign workers into the U.S.  In 1951, Truman signed legislation permitting a specified number of legal migrants to harvest crops in the U.S.  It was Truman who said, "Everyone suffers from the presence of these illegal immigrants in the community."  Both Hoover and Truman would be labeled heinous, bigoted racists or worse by current-day Democrats.

Truman's successor, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, initiated "Operation Wetback" in a coordinated effort between the U.S. Border Patrol and the military to physically locate and then deport illegal aliens in 1954.  It's estimated that 1.3 million illegals were deported or left voluntarily.  The overwhelming majority of illegals returned to Mexico, most of whom were residing in the U.S. Southwest.  Eisenhower said in his 1953 State of the Union address, "It is a manifest right of our [g]overnment to limit the number of immigrants our [n]ation can absorb.  It is also a manifest right of our [g]overnment to set reasonable requirements on the character and the numbers of the people who come to share our land and our freedom."  President Trump simply reiterated Eisenhower's words, in perhaps a more blunt, but certainly a truthful manner of speaking.  What do Hoover, Truman, Eisenhower, and Trump all have in common?  The knowledge that unfettered illegal immigration is an overwhelming financial strain and a cumbersome burden on American society as a whole and that it cannot be sustained in perpetuity.

In contrast to his immediate predecessors, candidate Donald Trump willingly embraced the issue of illegal immigration during his campaign.  Furthermore, as president, Trump has vowed to resolve and finally fix the problematic issues of chain migration and lax government oversight of foreigners issued work visas; cap the number of qualified refugees; eliminate the "diversity" lottery; and end the DACA program, the unconstitutional amnesty program implemented by Barack Obama without the legislative approval of Congress.  President Trump is also determined to oversee the building of a border wall between Mexico and the United States.  No other president in modern history has attempted to take on such an enormous task.  Instead, President Trump has been called numerous insulting and slanderous adjectives, in addition to beating back activist judges, who have attempted repeatedly to thwart his resolve to fix a broken immigration system.

Maybe it's time to examine the immigration laws of other first-world countries and adopt a sensible national policy, modeling laws that are working in countries such as Australia.  I've taken the time to research and study their immigration policies.  One thing is for certain: the immigration laws in Australia are equitable and fair; the laws are strictly enforced; and, more importantly, there is no such thing as illegally immigrating to Australia.  Legal immigration has a single purpose: to benefit the nation.  The same can't be said in America.