Smack-down for Fusion GPS's whiners from the WSJ editorial page

After doing one sneaky thing after another, the smear outfit known as Fusion GPS is out there on the op-ed pages of the New York Times, whining about getting exposed for what it really is and claiming that the whole thing is a threat to democracy.

No, really.

Fortunately, Glenn Simpson's old employer, the Wall Street Journal, was wise to him and gave him the stinkeye in a masterly editorial smack-down.

Let's see.  The Clinton campaign hires Fusion GPS, an opposition research firm, to investigate the Trump campaign.  Fusion hires a former British spy, Christopher Steele, who produces a dossier based on Russian sources full of rumor, hearsay[,] and an occasional fact to allege collusion between the Kremlin and Trump campaign.  The dossier gets to the FBI, which uses it to justify opening a counterintelligence probe of the Trump campaign, perhaps including a judicial warrant to spy on Trump officials.  Then Fusion has Mr. Steele privately brief select media reporters, ensuring that the dossier's contents become public before the election.

And now Fusion GPS complains about being a victim?  Only in Washington, folks.

***

That's the sob story spun by Fusion GPS founders Glenn Simpson and Peter Fritsch Wednesday in a New York Times op-ed that matches the Steele dossier for disinformation.  The Fusion duo portray themselves as valiantly working to "highlight Mr. Trump's Russia ties" by providing the FBI with "intelligence reports" that corroborated "credible allegations of collusion between the Trump camp and Russia."

It just gets better and better, the more you keep reading.

The Journal points out that the company's main problem is producing anything truthful and calls Simpson and Fritsch out for playing the democracy-at-stake card while taking cash from Russian operatives to smear human rights activists such as William Browder.  It does so much of its work on the sly and out of normal scrutiny that it simply defines the swamp.  Then it whines when the spotlight of the press and congressional investigators exposes its real doings.

What its real problem seems to be is that it doesn't always get away with it.  The Journal, which must know Simpson and Fritsch all too well from its previous hiring of the pair, has a powerful grip on the facts, summed up succinctly, and this pair's number.

After doing one sneaky thing after another, the smear outfit known as Fusion GPS is out there on the op-ed pages of the New York Times, whining about getting exposed for what it really is and claiming that the whole thing is a threat to democracy.

No, really.

Fortunately, Glenn Simpson's old employer, the Wall Street Journal, was wise to him and gave him the stinkeye in a masterly editorial smack-down.

Let's see.  The Clinton campaign hires Fusion GPS, an opposition research firm, to investigate the Trump campaign.  Fusion hires a former British spy, Christopher Steele, who produces a dossier based on Russian sources full of rumor, hearsay[,] and an occasional fact to allege collusion between the Kremlin and Trump campaign.  The dossier gets to the FBI, which uses it to justify opening a counterintelligence probe of the Trump campaign, perhaps including a judicial warrant to spy on Trump officials.  Then Fusion has Mr. Steele privately brief select media reporters, ensuring that the dossier's contents become public before the election.

And now Fusion GPS complains about being a victim?  Only in Washington, folks.

***

That's the sob story spun by Fusion GPS founders Glenn Simpson and Peter Fritsch Wednesday in a New York Times op-ed that matches the Steele dossier for disinformation.  The Fusion duo portray themselves as valiantly working to "highlight Mr. Trump's Russia ties" by providing the FBI with "intelligence reports" that corroborated "credible allegations of collusion between the Trump camp and Russia."

It just gets better and better, the more you keep reading.

The Journal points out that the company's main problem is producing anything truthful and calls Simpson and Fritsch out for playing the democracy-at-stake card while taking cash from Russian operatives to smear human rights activists such as William Browder.  It does so much of its work on the sly and out of normal scrutiny that it simply defines the swamp.  Then it whines when the spotlight of the press and congressional investigators exposes its real doings.

What its real problem seems to be is that it doesn't always get away with it.  The Journal, which must know Simpson and Fritsch all too well from its previous hiring of the pair, has a powerful grip on the facts, summed up succinctly, and this pair's number.

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