FBI lovebirds sing a leaky tune

Like a couple of teenagers blissfully unaware of the watchful eyes of their parents, FBI lovebirds Peter Strzok and Lisa Page got caught out for sending text messages showing just what Deep State was up to.

Exposed by The Hill's John Solomon, the messages show a self-satisfied pair egging each other on in leaks, snipes, bitchiness, and insults, centered on their copious and potentially illegal contacts with the media.  You have to read it to believe it.  What it shows is that the whole thing pretty well amounts to a conspiracy against the incoming new administration of President Trump.  The other thing it shows is that it had all the sophistication of a real teenage conspiracy.

Solomon reports that the lovebirds, for starters, may have been leaking to the Wall Street Journal.  Well, how romantic:

"Article is out, but hidden behind paywall so can't read it," Page texted Strzok on Oct. 24, 2016.

"Wsj? Boy that was fast," Strzok texted back, using the initials of the famed financial newspaper.  "Should I 'find' it and tell the team?"

The text messages, which were reviewed by The Hill, show [that] the two FBI agents discussed how they might make it appear they [had] innocently discovered the article, such as through Google News alerts.

"I can get it like I do every other article that hits any Google News alerts, seriously," Strzok wrote, adding he didn't want his team hearing about the article "from someone else."

The two of them seemed to have had it in for the New York Times' Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Matt Apuzzo, trying to get into his personal life and dishing the shade:

The two agents also spent extensive time shortly before the 2016 election trying to track down information – including an address and a spouse's job – about The New York Times reporter Matt Apuzzo, who has reported on numerous developments in the Russia case.

"We got a list of kids with their parents' names.  How many Matt Apuzzo's (sic) could there be in DC," Page texted.  "Showed J a picture, he said he thinks he has seen a guy who kinda looks like that, but always really schlubby. I said that sounds like every reporter I have ever seen."

A minute later, Page added another text: "Found what I think might be their address, too."

Strzok writes back, "He's TOTALLY schlubby. Don't you remember?"

Page responded later by saying she found information on the reporter's wife too.  "Found address looking for her. Lawyer."

After that, Solomon reports, came the teenage paranoia between the two of them about getting found out.

There also are multiple examples of bullying, covering up, taking revenge, and other sneakiness best recalled from a movie such as Mean Girls or Clueless.

A look at the hapless Apuzzo's Twitter site shows actual sympathy from Trumpsters who consider the Deep State more objectionable than even the mainstream press:

Another thing was their cheep-and-cackle about what was probably a Paul Sperry column in the New York Post, signaling their disdain for field agents:

Occasionally the two also opined about the media in general.  Strzok, for instance, called a New York Post article about agents unhappy with the outcome of the Clinton email case "stupid," and referred to Fox anchor Chris Wallace as a "turd."

Now that Congress is curious, their childish text messages are there for everyone to read, Politico reports:

The goal, according to a half-dozen lawmakers and aides, is to expose any concerted effort by law enforcement officials to spin an anti-Trump narrative in the media through unauthorized leaks.

If that was the goal, the lovebirds can be given a participation award.  But this has got to be the biggest black eye to their own reputations and the reputation for professionalism of the FBI it has had in many decades.

Let's hope Congress gets to the bottom of this by giving them some explaining to do.

Like a couple of teenagers blissfully unaware of the watchful eyes of their parents, FBI lovebirds Peter Strzok and Lisa Page got caught out for sending text messages showing just what Deep State was up to.

Exposed by The Hill's John Solomon, the messages show a self-satisfied pair egging each other on in leaks, snipes, bitchiness, and insults, centered on their copious and potentially illegal contacts with the media.  You have to read it to believe it.  What it shows is that the whole thing pretty well amounts to a conspiracy against the incoming new administration of President Trump.  The other thing it shows is that it had all the sophistication of a real teenage conspiracy.

Solomon reports that the lovebirds, for starters, may have been leaking to the Wall Street Journal.  Well, how romantic:

"Article is out, but hidden behind paywall so can't read it," Page texted Strzok on Oct. 24, 2016.

"Wsj? Boy that was fast," Strzok texted back, using the initials of the famed financial newspaper.  "Should I 'find' it and tell the team?"

The text messages, which were reviewed by The Hill, show [that] the two FBI agents discussed how they might make it appear they [had] innocently discovered the article, such as through Google News alerts.

"I can get it like I do every other article that hits any Google News alerts, seriously," Strzok wrote, adding he didn't want his team hearing about the article "from someone else."

The two of them seemed to have had it in for the New York Times' Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Matt Apuzzo, trying to get into his personal life and dishing the shade:

The two agents also spent extensive time shortly before the 2016 election trying to track down information – including an address and a spouse's job – about The New York Times reporter Matt Apuzzo, who has reported on numerous developments in the Russia case.

"We got a list of kids with their parents' names.  How many Matt Apuzzo's (sic) could there be in DC," Page texted.  "Showed J a picture, he said he thinks he has seen a guy who kinda looks like that, but always really schlubby. I said that sounds like every reporter I have ever seen."

A minute later, Page added another text: "Found what I think might be their address, too."

Strzok writes back, "He's TOTALLY schlubby. Don't you remember?"

Page responded later by saying she found information on the reporter's wife too.  "Found address looking for her. Lawyer."

After that, Solomon reports, came the teenage paranoia between the two of them about getting found out.

There also are multiple examples of bullying, covering up, taking revenge, and other sneakiness best recalled from a movie such as Mean Girls or Clueless.

A look at the hapless Apuzzo's Twitter site shows actual sympathy from Trumpsters who consider the Deep State more objectionable than even the mainstream press:

Another thing was their cheep-and-cackle about what was probably a Paul Sperry column in the New York Post, signaling their disdain for field agents:

Occasionally the two also opined about the media in general.  Strzok, for instance, called a New York Post article about agents unhappy with the outcome of the Clinton email case "stupid," and referred to Fox anchor Chris Wallace as a "turd."

Now that Congress is curious, their childish text messages are there for everyone to read, Politico reports:

The goal, according to a half-dozen lawmakers and aides, is to expose any concerted effort by law enforcement officials to spin an anti-Trump narrative in the media through unauthorized leaks.

If that was the goal, the lovebirds can be given a participation award.  But this has got to be the biggest black eye to their own reputations and the reputation for professionalism of the FBI it has had in many decades.

Let's hope Congress gets to the bottom of this by giving them some explaining to do.

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