Donald Trump, jiu-jitsu president

Scott Adams argues in Win Bigly that President Trump has "weapons grade" persuasion skills.  In the tumble over Fire and Fury, those skills are on display, as Trump deploys political jiu-jitsu to suck up the "media energy" and turn the tables on his detractors, as described in four columns linked at realclearpolitics.com.

James S. Robbins, writing at usatoday.com, says Trump has turned the tables on the "overwrought speculation about the president's mental fitness":

Not one to shy away from a fight, President Trump punched back that not only is he a successful chief executive, [but] he's a "very stable genius" to boot.  Dilbert[-]creator Scott Adams took the matter a step f[a]rther by arguing that proclaiming himself a "very stable genius" or "VSG" was itself a genius Trump move because that will be his "forever name."  Whether people use the expression VSG admiringly or sarcastically, the words "Trump" and "genius" are going to be kept in close proximity.

When the dust settles, Fire and Fury is forgotten, but Trump remains the very stable genius who beats the media at their own game.

It's not even a fair fight at times.  Andrew Klavan, at pjmedia.com, says "our mainstream journalists are genuinely awful":

They will sell any narrative they can to keep from selling the one that seems increasingly likely to be true: Trump is smarter than they are and doing a better job than the last two presidents combined.

Klavan says Fire and Fury seems like "a tale told by an idiot, signifying nothing":

The nation's journalists cover this obvious nonsense because otherwise, they'd have to enter what to them is uncharted territory: the truth.

... But that would mean that Trump is practically smarter and more adept than the journalists who hate him and those journalists will accept any narrative other than that one.

... They're now actually reporting their fantasies – fantasies in which Trump doesn't keep making them look like the idiots they are.

David Brooks at nytimes.com, glimpsing the truth, fears that the White House has learned to "deke us": keep our "focus" on "the Potemkin White House" – "Trump berserk in front of the TV" – while the "Invisible White House that you never hear about" gets things done:

I sometimes wonder if the Invisible White House has learned to use the Potemkin White House to deke us while it changes the country.

Brooks further laments Trump making the anti-Trump media look "silly":

I've noticed [that] a lot of young people look at the monotonous daily hysteria of we [sic; should be "us" –ed.] anti-Trumpers and they find it silly.

The media are just the beginning for Trump jiu-jitsu.  Victor Davis Hanson, dissecting Trump's alleged craziness at amgreatness.com, turns the tables on Trump's predecessor:

Once Trump was in power, how does [Fire and Fury author Michael] Wolff explain the near phenomenal economic turnaround in the latter part of 2017?  Does he not see that the stupider you make Trump in his successful first year, by inference the even stupider you make the supposedly smarter actors in their many failed years?

... Why did not the supposedly far more sober and judicious Obama comprehend how to achieve 3 percent GDP growth[?] ... Why did not black employment reach 2018 levels in 2013?

Is not a man like Obama who eats arugula instead of daily swigging a dozen diet sodas far more studious and intellectually curious on all matters economic?  Are we dunces really to believe [that] merely building a high-rise in Manhattan takes more savvy than editing in near absentia the Harvard Law Review?

Hanson contends that Fire and Fury provides no "explanation how such supposed clueless amateurs" could achieve so much:

And that is the quandary[,] is it not?  The dunce Trump in his first year was supposed to prove an irrelevant dumbo, not a skilled conservative revolutionary who threatens to nullify 2009-2017?

After a week of Fire and Fury, Trump is a very stable genius, the media are silly idiots, and his predecessor is incompetent.  All thanks to Trump jiu-jitsu.

The president's upcoming "Fake News Awards," scheduled for Wednesday, January 17, will feature weapons-grade political jiu-jitsu, as Trump sucks up all the energy in the room and turns it back on his media detractors, all dutifully covered live on national TV. 

Cook up the popcorn.

Scott Adams argues in Win Bigly that President Trump has "weapons grade" persuasion skills.  In the tumble over Fire and Fury, those skills are on display, as Trump deploys political jiu-jitsu to suck up the "media energy" and turn the tables on his detractors, as described in four columns linked at realclearpolitics.com.

James S. Robbins, writing at usatoday.com, says Trump has turned the tables on the "overwrought speculation about the president's mental fitness":

Not one to shy away from a fight, President Trump punched back that not only is he a successful chief executive, [but] he's a "very stable genius" to boot.  Dilbert[-]creator Scott Adams took the matter a step f[a]rther by arguing that proclaiming himself a "very stable genius" or "VSG" was itself a genius Trump move because that will be his "forever name."  Whether people use the expression VSG admiringly or sarcastically, the words "Trump" and "genius" are going to be kept in close proximity.

When the dust settles, Fire and Fury is forgotten, but Trump remains the very stable genius who beats the media at their own game.

It's not even a fair fight at times.  Andrew Klavan, at pjmedia.com, says "our mainstream journalists are genuinely awful":

They will sell any narrative they can to keep from selling the one that seems increasingly likely to be true: Trump is smarter than they are and doing a better job than the last two presidents combined.

Klavan says Fire and Fury seems like "a tale told by an idiot, signifying nothing":

The nation's journalists cover this obvious nonsense because otherwise, they'd have to enter what to them is uncharted territory: the truth.

... But that would mean that Trump is practically smarter and more adept than the journalists who hate him and those journalists will accept any narrative other than that one.

... They're now actually reporting their fantasies – fantasies in which Trump doesn't keep making them look like the idiots they are.

David Brooks at nytimes.com, glimpsing the truth, fears that the White House has learned to "deke us": keep our "focus" on "the Potemkin White House" – "Trump berserk in front of the TV" – while the "Invisible White House that you never hear about" gets things done:

I sometimes wonder if the Invisible White House has learned to use the Potemkin White House to deke us while it changes the country.

Brooks further laments Trump making the anti-Trump media look "silly":

I've noticed [that] a lot of young people look at the monotonous daily hysteria of we [sic; should be "us" –ed.] anti-Trumpers and they find it silly.

The media are just the beginning for Trump jiu-jitsu.  Victor Davis Hanson, dissecting Trump's alleged craziness at amgreatness.com, turns the tables on Trump's predecessor:

Once Trump was in power, how does [Fire and Fury author Michael] Wolff explain the near phenomenal economic turnaround in the latter part of 2017?  Does he not see that the stupider you make Trump in his successful first year, by inference the even stupider you make the supposedly smarter actors in their many failed years?

... Why did not the supposedly far more sober and judicious Obama comprehend how to achieve 3 percent GDP growth[?] ... Why did not black employment reach 2018 levels in 2013?

Is not a man like Obama who eats arugula instead of daily swigging a dozen diet sodas far more studious and intellectually curious on all matters economic?  Are we dunces really to believe [that] merely building a high-rise in Manhattan takes more savvy than editing in near absentia the Harvard Law Review?

Hanson contends that Fire and Fury provides no "explanation how such supposed clueless amateurs" could achieve so much:

And that is the quandary[,] is it not?  The dunce Trump in his first year was supposed to prove an irrelevant dumbo, not a skilled conservative revolutionary who threatens to nullify 2009-2017?

After a week of Fire and Fury, Trump is a very stable genius, the media are silly idiots, and his predecessor is incompetent.  All thanks to Trump jiu-jitsu.

The president's upcoming "Fake News Awards," scheduled for Wednesday, January 17, will feature weapons-grade political jiu-jitsu, as Trump sucks up all the energy in the room and turns it back on his media detractors, all dutifully covered live on national TV. 

Cook up the popcorn.

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