NFL owners' 'social justice' bribe spectacularly fails

Another progressive delusion was exposed yesterday as NFL owners discovered that their attempt to bribe angry black players into behaving themselves flopped as the nation watched.

Despite promises to donate almost $90 million to "social justice" causes (which seem to be charities ostensibly benefiting African-Americans) if players would only respect the National Anthem the way their colleagues in other major league sports do, various NFL players demonstrated their contempt during games.

Deadline Hollywood lists the protests:

For the Los Angeles Chargers, left tackler Russell Okung continued his raised fist during the national anthem, as he has done for several weeks. ...

At Oakland, running back Marshawn Lynch again remained seated during the US national anthem (the Mexican national anthem, which Lynch stood for weeks ago, was not performed) before his team's game against the Giants. ...

The Los Angeles Rams continued to see linebacker Robert Quinn put his right fist in the air during the anthem, with punter Johnny Hekker against putting his arm around Quinn in support, a maneuver they have done most of the season. Running back Todd Gurley and receiver Tavon Austin linked arms.

In New Orleans, the Saints once again knelt as a team in unity before the national anthem, rising once the song began. Some players and coaches locked arms.

At the Meadowlands, cornerback Marcus Peters of the Kansas City Chiefs stood in the tunnel during the national anthem, coming back to the field once the song ended. ...

In Miami, safety Michael Thomas, tight end Julius Thomas, and wide receiver Kenny Stills all kneeled during the anthem, as they have done for weeks. ...

The San Francisco 49ers saw receiver Marquise Goodwin, safety Eric Reid and linebacker Eli Harold kneel during the anthem before their game against the Bears. Receiver Louis Murphy stood behind them with is right fist in the air. Reid is among the players adamantly opposed to the league's money offer.

For the Tennessee Titans, receiver Rishard Matthews stayed in the locker room during the anthem, but emerged after. He is currently out with a hamstring injury.

The lone new voice in the protest coalition was Baltimore Ravens linebacker Tyus Bowser. He knelt in prayer in the end zone during the beginning of the national anthem before running to the sideline and putting his hand over his heart.

It is not as if the owners weren't warned.  Bullies don't stop being bullies when they get benefits for their bullying. A ppeasement doesn't work in the face of an angry and aggressive foe.

So what do the owners do now?  The obvious option would be to suspend the promised donations:

[T]he United Negro College Fund and Dream Corps. would receive $25 million each, with the remainder of the funding going to the ad-hoc Players Coalition to distribute as they desire[.]

It looks to me as though the owners are thoroughly intimidated by their players.  They know that team success depends on getting the best players and are loath to stand firm the way the NBA has.  Why?  Maybe it is the larger size of the teams, but I suspect that the specter of brain injuries lurking in the background is also at work.  Players have every reason to be angry that they may be sacrificing their brain health in the service of rich white owners.  Even with million-dollar salaries (for careers that rarely extend more than a few years), the feeling of being exploited is natural.

So will the NFL owners and Roger Goodell develop the intestinal fortitude to announce something on the order of "OK, you had your chance!  The deal is off, and it is your fault that The United Negro College Fund and others will have fewer resources"?

I am skeptical that they will.  It is too confrontational, and they might even be called "racist."  In the rarified world of billionaires that most of the owners move in, standing up to victim minorities simply isn't done (in the open).  So I expect that the protests will continue, and the decline of the NFL in public esteem will accelerate.  And, by the way, when the Oakland Raiders move to Las Vegas, I would not count on tax-exempt bonds financing a new stadium for them.

Another progressive delusion was exposed yesterday as NFL owners discovered that their attempt to bribe angry black players into behaving themselves flopped as the nation watched.

Despite promises to donate almost $90 million to "social justice" causes (which seem to be charities ostensibly benefiting African-Americans) if players would only respect the National Anthem the way their colleagues in other major league sports do, various NFL players demonstrated their contempt during games.

Deadline Hollywood lists the protests:

For the Los Angeles Chargers, left tackler Russell Okung continued his raised fist during the national anthem, as he has done for several weeks. ...

At Oakland, running back Marshawn Lynch again remained seated during the US national anthem (the Mexican national anthem, which Lynch stood for weeks ago, was not performed) before his team's game against the Giants. ...

The Los Angeles Rams continued to see linebacker Robert Quinn put his right fist in the air during the anthem, with punter Johnny Hekker against putting his arm around Quinn in support, a maneuver they have done most of the season. Running back Todd Gurley and receiver Tavon Austin linked arms.

In New Orleans, the Saints once again knelt as a team in unity before the national anthem, rising once the song began. Some players and coaches locked arms.

At the Meadowlands, cornerback Marcus Peters of the Kansas City Chiefs stood in the tunnel during the national anthem, coming back to the field once the song ended. ...

In Miami, safety Michael Thomas, tight end Julius Thomas, and wide receiver Kenny Stills all kneeled during the anthem, as they have done for weeks. ...

The San Francisco 49ers saw receiver Marquise Goodwin, safety Eric Reid and linebacker Eli Harold kneel during the anthem before their game against the Bears. Receiver Louis Murphy stood behind them with is right fist in the air. Reid is among the players adamantly opposed to the league's money offer.

For the Tennessee Titans, receiver Rishard Matthews stayed in the locker room during the anthem, but emerged after. He is currently out with a hamstring injury.

The lone new voice in the protest coalition was Baltimore Ravens linebacker Tyus Bowser. He knelt in prayer in the end zone during the beginning of the national anthem before running to the sideline and putting his hand over his heart.

It is not as if the owners weren't warned.  Bullies don't stop being bullies when they get benefits for their bullying. A ppeasement doesn't work in the face of an angry and aggressive foe.

So what do the owners do now?  The obvious option would be to suspend the promised donations:

[T]he United Negro College Fund and Dream Corps. would receive $25 million each, with the remainder of the funding going to the ad-hoc Players Coalition to distribute as they desire[.]

It looks to me as though the owners are thoroughly intimidated by their players.  They know that team success depends on getting the best players and are loath to stand firm the way the NBA has.  Why?  Maybe it is the larger size of the teams, but I suspect that the specter of brain injuries lurking in the background is also at work.  Players have every reason to be angry that they may be sacrificing their brain health in the service of rich white owners.  Even with million-dollar salaries (for careers that rarely extend more than a few years), the feeling of being exploited is natural.

So will the NFL owners and Roger Goodell develop the intestinal fortitude to announce something on the order of "OK, you had your chance!  The deal is off, and it is your fault that The United Negro College Fund and others will have fewer resources"?

I am skeptical that they will.  It is too confrontational, and they might even be called "racist."  In the rarified world of billionaires that most of the owners move in, standing up to victim minorities simply isn't done (in the open).  So I expect that the protests will continue, and the decline of the NFL in public esteem will accelerate.  And, by the way, when the Oakland Raiders move to Las Vegas, I would not count on tax-exempt bonds financing a new stadium for them.

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