WaPo: America shaken by bad verdict on Steinle killing, Nazis and white nationalists hardest hit

According to the Washington Post, anyone who finds the Kate Steinle verdict upsetting can only be a white nationalist or a neo-Nazi.  Any questions as to why the public so vehemently despises the press?

In an article that had to be amended because it was apparently so badly sourced, the Washington Post reported on the aftermath of the verdict exclusively through the point of view of neo-Nazis and white supremacists.  Kid you not.  Implication: If you're angry about the Steinle verdict, then you must be a neo-Nazi.  The only other implication is that only Nazi views matter.  Then, to drive the point home, the Post tweeted about its story in those terms.

White nationalists angered by Mexican immigrant's acquittal in Kate Steinle's killing https://t.co/LejPAii8t1

— Washington Post (@washingtonpost) December 2, 2017

The comments that followed, documented on Twitchy, and also the tweet itself, are priceless.

Kind of mean of the WaPo to call her family Nazis. https://t.co/lzBjN2L5wB

— Instapundit.com (@instapundit) December 5, 2017

This one, which wasn't included in the Twitchy curation, on the comments line of the WaPo tweet, is my favorite:

I'm NOT A WHITE NATIONALIST and IM [F-----] PISSED..I WENT TO PRISON FOR 5YRS FOR ASSULT AND BATTERY AND G.B.I AT A BAR..HE MURDERS & WALKS!

— Anthony Rodrigo (@RealAmericanSol) December 4, 2017

Well, yeah.

Because here we have a nation of 300 million (including people on the left and people of all colors) who were disheartened by the acquittal of Kate Steinle's killer, a drug-dealer known as José Inés García Zarate or José Francisco López-Sánchez (or whatever the guy without "papers" called himself at the moment), who committed seven previous felonies and was deported five times from the U.S. for illegal immigration – and the only members of that 300 million the Washington Post thinks are worth querying about it are neo-Nazis.

The Post's claim that a spontaneous memorial erected to Kate Steinle was the work of neo-Nazis is highly questionable, given what it looks like, and the paper's means of supporting that claim, by blaming unnamed local media reports (how convenient), and an "Alt-Right" note found in the mass of the memorial. It's thin gruel.

What we have here is a vast shift in sentiment from this verdict that extends across all races and classes in the U.S.  But the Post wants to talk only about Nazis.  In other words, Nazis hardest hit.

Will they write about tax reform next in the context of how it affects Nazis?

As if the views of neo-Nazis matter to anyone anywhere in the mainstream of American life.  As if ordinary Americans would even know such people.  The idea was propagandistic: to make anyone who questions why a five-times-deported felon who fires a gun into a crowd ought to be walking among us worry that such views are really racist.  Whatever it was that Zarate did and the circumstances of his case are irrelevant.

Mickey Kaus has the most insight about what this game is about:

But somebody really needs to tell awful, creepy Richard Spencer to go away. Gloms on to & tarnishes legitimate causes, which is of course why MSM publicizes him. https://t.co/BnJBxlatVV

— Mickey Kaus (@kausmickey) December 4, 2017

More to the point, as the WaPo spends its time and resources lovingly recording every thought and reaction of neo-Nazis, what the paper doesn't want is to know the views of ordinary Americans out in the flyover.

The reporter of the story, for example, Kristine Phillips, née Kristine Guerra, has made it pretty clear that she can't really stand Americans out in the heartland.  When she got her job with the Washington Post a few years ago, she actually tweeted this:

Last day in Indianapolis! Can't believe I'm saying this, but I'll miss you, Indy. Thanks for a great four years!

— Kristine Phillips (@kristinegWP) July 26, 2016

Can she explain to us why she "can't believe" she would miss Indianapolis?  As if no one could possibly miss a place like...Indianapolis?  Her Twitter site is bannered with racial grievance-mongering (Michelle Malkin can certainly top her for disgusting things leftist readers have emailed to her by a long shot), and given what she retweets, she seems to have an obsession with Trump, something that must be frustrating, given that her beat is national spot stories.  So instead of focusing on Trump, her repertoire is the make-do substitute of writing almost exclusively about Nazis and America as this Nazi-infested place, despite Nazis numbering probably only in three or four digit figures in the U.S.  Check out her list of stories; it's virtually all Nazis.  She's the Nazi Beat reporter, not a national correspondent.  As if anyone stupid enough to be a Nazi would have anything of interest to say.  But don't worry; she thinks they do and she's on the case.

Any questions as to why the press is hated?

According to the Washington Post, anyone who finds the Kate Steinle verdict upsetting can only be a white nationalist or a neo-Nazi.  Any questions as to why the public so vehemently despises the press?

In an article that had to be amended because it was apparently so badly sourced, the Washington Post reported on the aftermath of the verdict exclusively through the point of view of neo-Nazis and white supremacists.  Kid you not.  Implication: If you're angry about the Steinle verdict, then you must be a neo-Nazi.  The only other implication is that only Nazi views matter.  Then, to drive the point home, the Post tweeted about its story in those terms.

White nationalists angered by Mexican immigrant's acquittal in Kate Steinle's killing https://t.co/LejPAii8t1

— Washington Post (@washingtonpost) December 2, 2017

The comments that followed, documented on Twitchy, and also the tweet itself, are priceless.

Kind of mean of the WaPo to call her family Nazis. https://t.co/lzBjN2L5wB

— Instapundit.com (@instapundit) December 5, 2017

This one, which wasn't included in the Twitchy curation, on the comments line of the WaPo tweet, is my favorite:

I'm NOT A WHITE NATIONALIST and IM [F-----] PISSED..I WENT TO PRISON FOR 5YRS FOR ASSULT AND BATTERY AND G.B.I AT A BAR..HE MURDERS & WALKS!

— Anthony Rodrigo (@RealAmericanSol) December 4, 2017

Well, yeah.

Because here we have a nation of 300 million (including people on the left and people of all colors) who were disheartened by the acquittal of Kate Steinle's killer, a drug-dealer known as José Inés García Zarate or José Francisco López-Sánchez (or whatever the guy without "papers" called himself at the moment), who committed seven previous felonies and was deported five times from the U.S. for illegal immigration – and the only members of that 300 million the Washington Post thinks are worth querying about it are neo-Nazis.

The Post's claim that a spontaneous memorial erected to Kate Steinle was the work of neo-Nazis is highly questionable, given what it looks like, and the paper's means of supporting that claim, by blaming unnamed local media reports (how convenient), and an "Alt-Right" note found in the mass of the memorial. It's thin gruel.

What we have here is a vast shift in sentiment from this verdict that extends across all races and classes in the U.S.  But the Post wants to talk only about Nazis.  In other words, Nazis hardest hit.

Will they write about tax reform next in the context of how it affects Nazis?

As if the views of neo-Nazis matter to anyone anywhere in the mainstream of American life.  As if ordinary Americans would even know such people.  The idea was propagandistic: to make anyone who questions why a five-times-deported felon who fires a gun into a crowd ought to be walking among us worry that such views are really racist.  Whatever it was that Zarate did and the circumstances of his case are irrelevant.

Mickey Kaus has the most insight about what this game is about:

But somebody really needs to tell awful, creepy Richard Spencer to go away. Gloms on to & tarnishes legitimate causes, which is of course why MSM publicizes him. https://t.co/BnJBxlatVV

— Mickey Kaus (@kausmickey) December 4, 2017

More to the point, as the WaPo spends its time and resources lovingly recording every thought and reaction of neo-Nazis, what the paper doesn't want is to know the views of ordinary Americans out in the flyover.

The reporter of the story, for example, Kristine Phillips, née Kristine Guerra, has made it pretty clear that she can't really stand Americans out in the heartland.  When she got her job with the Washington Post a few years ago, she actually tweeted this:

Last day in Indianapolis! Can't believe I'm saying this, but I'll miss you, Indy. Thanks for a great four years!

— Kristine Phillips (@kristinegWP) July 26, 2016

Can she explain to us why she "can't believe" she would miss Indianapolis?  As if no one could possibly miss a place like...Indianapolis?  Her Twitter site is bannered with racial grievance-mongering (Michelle Malkin can certainly top her for disgusting things leftist readers have emailed to her by a long shot), and given what she retweets, she seems to have an obsession with Trump, something that must be frustrating, given that her beat is national spot stories.  So instead of focusing on Trump, her repertoire is the make-do substitute of writing almost exclusively about Nazis and America as this Nazi-infested place, despite Nazis numbering probably only in three or four digit figures in the U.S.  Check out her list of stories; it's virtually all Nazis.  She's the Nazi Beat reporter, not a national correspondent.  As if anyone stupid enough to be a Nazi would have anything of interest to say.  But don't worry; she thinks they do and she's on the case.

Any questions as to why the press is hated?

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