California NAACP wants to remove 'Star-Spangled Banner' as national anthem

The California chapter of the NAACP will ask the Legislature to join a campaign to remove the "Star-Spangled Banner" as America's national anthem.

The move is guaranteed to generate tons of free publicity for the old-line civil rights group as they seek to radicalize their agenda to appeal to younger blacks who support Black Lives Matter.

Sacramento Bee:

The organization last week began circulating among legislative offices two resolutions that passed at its state conference in October: one urging Congress to rescind "one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon" as the national anthem, and another in support of former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who launched a protest movement against police brutality among professional athletes by kneeling when "The Star-Spangled Banner" was played before games.

"We owe a lot of it to Kaepernick," California NAACP President Alice Huffman said. "I think all this controversy about the knee will go away once the song is removed."

The kneeling protests have drawn attention to an infrequently-sung third verse from "The Star-Spangled Banner," which includes the passage:

Their blood has wash'd out their foul footstep's pollution.

No refuge could save the hireling and slave

From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave

Some interpretations of the lyrics conclude that they celebrate the deaths of black American slaves who joined British troops during the War of 1812 to gain their freedom. Francis Scott Key, who wrote the lyrics of "The Star-Spangled Banner," was a slave owner and fierce opponent of abolition who may have sparked the first race riot in Washington, D.C.

Huffman said Congress, which adopted "The Star-Spangled Banner" as the national anthem in 1931, should find a replacement that is not "another song that disenfranchises part of the American population."

She drafted the NAACP's resolutions this fall after President Donald Trump suggested NFL owners should fire any "son of a bitch" who doesn't stand for the anthem. The second resolution calls on Congress to censure Trump for his remarks, and asks NFL teams to find a spot for Kaepernick, who some believe was blacklisted over the protests.

"Trump got in the middle of it. He blew it out of proportion," Huffman said.

Was Francis Scott Key condemning blacks who joined the British, or was he condemning traitors?  It hardly matters when activists are given the opportunity to score political points.

Interestingly, Ebony Magazine came up with some alternatives we might consider adopting as our anthem.  One of the replacements the magazine recommend is a rap song by UKG, "The International Players Anthem":

The California resident behind the call to replace the controversial song argues that "International Players Anthem's reference to safe sex and the illustrious Andre 3000's sheer presence in the song as reasons it should become the country's new anthem. It also has a one-up on the "Star-Spangled Banner" in that its writer(s) don't have a history of owning slaves.

Because one of America's founding principles is "safe sex."

They also recommend as a replacement for the Star-Spangled Banner "Party Rock Anthem" by a group called LMFAO ("Laughing My F------ Ass Off"). 

Here's are some of the stirring lyrics:

Party rock, yeah, woo, let's go
Party rock is in the house tonight
Everybody just have a good time
And we gon' make you lose your mind
Everybody just have a good time

There are several other equally objectionable, incredibly inappropriate songs recommended by Ebony, but that's the point.  They weren't really being serious – I think.  Their sole point was to disrespect the anthem – mission accomplished.

As for the radicalization of the NAACP, their recent outrageousness is being driven by fear that their relative moderation on race issues was making them irrelevant in the black community.  Individual chapters have taken it upon themselves to change that by making proposals that are just as exaggerated, just as hysterical as the Black Lives Matter agenda.  The Missouri NAACP chapter announced in August that they had issued a travel advisory for the entire state, warning blacks about traveling within or through Missouri.

Not to be outdone by that stupidity, the national organization issued a travel advisory not for a state or area, but for a company: American Airlines.

It's important to realize that – like the campaign to change the anthem – these are not serious proposals.  They are purely P.R. moves to get the NAACP noticed by the media and to raise their radical profile in the black community.  It remains to be seen whether this will work or not.  The only sure thing that will result from this new radicalism is that the current NAACP leadership are spitting on the graves of their predecessors, who worked to make the NAACP an agent of true change for black people.

The California chapter of the NAACP will ask the Legislature to join a campaign to remove the "Star-Spangled Banner" as America's national anthem.

The move is guaranteed to generate tons of free publicity for the old-line civil rights group as they seek to radicalize their agenda to appeal to younger blacks who support Black Lives Matter.

Sacramento Bee:

The organization last week began circulating among legislative offices two resolutions that passed at its state conference in October: one urging Congress to rescind "one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon" as the national anthem, and another in support of former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who launched a protest movement against police brutality among professional athletes by kneeling when "The Star-Spangled Banner" was played before games.

"We owe a lot of it to Kaepernick," California NAACP President Alice Huffman said. "I think all this controversy about the knee will go away once the song is removed."

The kneeling protests have drawn attention to an infrequently-sung third verse from "The Star-Spangled Banner," which includes the passage:

Their blood has wash'd out their foul footstep's pollution.

No refuge could save the hireling and slave

From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave

Some interpretations of the lyrics conclude that they celebrate the deaths of black American slaves who joined British troops during the War of 1812 to gain their freedom. Francis Scott Key, who wrote the lyrics of "The Star-Spangled Banner," was a slave owner and fierce opponent of abolition who may have sparked the first race riot in Washington, D.C.

Huffman said Congress, which adopted "The Star-Spangled Banner" as the national anthem in 1931, should find a replacement that is not "another song that disenfranchises part of the American population."

She drafted the NAACP's resolutions this fall after President Donald Trump suggested NFL owners should fire any "son of a bitch" who doesn't stand for the anthem. The second resolution calls on Congress to censure Trump for his remarks, and asks NFL teams to find a spot for Kaepernick, who some believe was blacklisted over the protests.

"Trump got in the middle of it. He blew it out of proportion," Huffman said.

Was Francis Scott Key condemning blacks who joined the British, or was he condemning traitors?  It hardly matters when activists are given the opportunity to score political points.

Interestingly, Ebony Magazine came up with some alternatives we might consider adopting as our anthem.  One of the replacements the magazine recommend is a rap song by UKG, "The International Players Anthem":

The California resident behind the call to replace the controversial song argues that "International Players Anthem's reference to safe sex and the illustrious Andre 3000's sheer presence in the song as reasons it should become the country's new anthem. It also has a one-up on the "Star-Spangled Banner" in that its writer(s) don't have a history of owning slaves.

Because one of America's founding principles is "safe sex."

They also recommend as a replacement for the Star-Spangled Banner "Party Rock Anthem" by a group called LMFAO ("Laughing My F------ Ass Off"). 

Here's are some of the stirring lyrics:

Party rock, yeah, woo, let's go
Party rock is in the house tonight
Everybody just have a good time
And we gon' make you lose your mind
Everybody just have a good time

There are several other equally objectionable, incredibly inappropriate songs recommended by Ebony, but that's the point.  They weren't really being serious – I think.  Their sole point was to disrespect the anthem – mission accomplished.

As for the radicalization of the NAACP, their recent outrageousness is being driven by fear that their relative moderation on race issues was making them irrelevant in the black community.  Individual chapters have taken it upon themselves to change that by making proposals that are just as exaggerated, just as hysterical as the Black Lives Matter agenda.  The Missouri NAACP chapter announced in August that they had issued a travel advisory for the entire state, warning blacks about traveling within or through Missouri.

Not to be outdone by that stupidity, the national organization issued a travel advisory not for a state or area, but for a company: American Airlines.

It's important to realize that – like the campaign to change the anthem – these are not serious proposals.  They are purely P.R. moves to get the NAACP noticed by the media and to raise their radical profile in the black community.  It remains to be seen whether this will work or not.  The only sure thing that will result from this new radicalism is that the current NAACP leadership are spitting on the graves of their predecessors, who worked to make the NAACP an agent of true change for black people.

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