Jane Fonda finally admits she's 'ashamed' of herself

"Hanoi Jane" Fonda has a lot to be ashamed of, but it took her complicity via silence with Harvey Weinstein's alleged serial molestation of young women to finally get her to admit she is ashamed of herself.  Yesterday on CNN, speaking with Christiane Amanpour, the noted "women's rights advocate" admitted that:

... she "found out about Harvey about a year ago."

"I'm ashamed that I didn't say anything right then," Fonda said.

That's odd, because one suspects that the actress watches the Oscars, and Seth McFarlane, the host of the 2012 broadcast, openly joked about Weinstein's bullying of actresses.

Even if she found out only a year ago, she remained silent while President and Mrs. Obama entrusted their young daughter Malia to Weinstein as an "intern" – the same position held by Monica Lewinsky in the White House.  And so, of course, did the many, many Hollywood figures who have palled around with the Obamas.

Fonda's silence while knowing about Weinstein is especially hypocritical, given her tirade at the Emmys last month.

The presentation for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie featured some of the most incendiary political commentary of the night.

Lily TomlinDolly Parton, and Jane Fonda were the presenters, and wasted no time in digging in. Alluding to their 1980s film 9 to 5, Fonda said, "In [9 to 5] we refused to be controlled by a sexist, egotist, lying hypocritical bigot."  Tomlin picked up the thread: "And in 2017, we still refuse to be controlled by a sexist, egotist, lying hypocritical bigot."

The crowd applauded warmly at the remarks. Parton just smiled. Category winner Alexander Skarsgard did not address them in his acceptance.

So, in a movie, a work of fiction, she fictitiously "refuse[d] to be controlled by a sexist, egotist, lying hypocritical bigot," but she was silent about an alleged "sexist, egotist, lying, hypocritical bigot" who was in a position to help or harm her own career.

So far as I can determine, Fonda has never admitted to being "ashamed" of her siding with North Vietnamese forces that were shooting down American military pilots in what must be one of the most infamous photos of a Hollywood figure in history.

She only called it a "huge, huge mistake," eerily reminiscent of the lack of contrition in Harvey Weinstein's "we all make mistakes" comments.

Of course, by the end of the interview, she as back to bashing Trump.

"Hanoi Jane" Fonda has a lot to be ashamed of, but it took her complicity via silence with Harvey Weinstein's alleged serial molestation of young women to finally get her to admit she is ashamed of herself.  Yesterday on CNN, speaking with Christiane Amanpour, the noted "women's rights advocate" admitted that:

... she "found out about Harvey about a year ago."

"I'm ashamed that I didn't say anything right then," Fonda said.

That's odd, because one suspects that the actress watches the Oscars, and Seth McFarlane, the host of the 2012 broadcast, openly joked about Weinstein's bullying of actresses.

Even if she found out only a year ago, she remained silent while President and Mrs. Obama entrusted their young daughter Malia to Weinstein as an "intern" – the same position held by Monica Lewinsky in the White House.  And so, of course, did the many, many Hollywood figures who have palled around with the Obamas.

Fonda's silence while knowing about Weinstein is especially hypocritical, given her tirade at the Emmys last month.

The presentation for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie featured some of the most incendiary political commentary of the night.

Lily TomlinDolly Parton, and Jane Fonda were the presenters, and wasted no time in digging in. Alluding to their 1980s film 9 to 5, Fonda said, "In [9 to 5] we refused to be controlled by a sexist, egotist, lying hypocritical bigot."  Tomlin picked up the thread: "And in 2017, we still refuse to be controlled by a sexist, egotist, lying hypocritical bigot."

The crowd applauded warmly at the remarks. Parton just smiled. Category winner Alexander Skarsgard did not address them in his acceptance.

So, in a movie, a work of fiction, she fictitiously "refuse[d] to be controlled by a sexist, egotist, lying hypocritical bigot," but she was silent about an alleged "sexist, egotist, lying, hypocritical bigot" who was in a position to help or harm her own career.

So far as I can determine, Fonda has never admitted to being "ashamed" of her siding with North Vietnamese forces that were shooting down American military pilots in what must be one of the most infamous photos of a Hollywood figure in history.

She only called it a "huge, huge mistake," eerily reminiscent of the lack of contrition in Harvey Weinstein's "we all make mistakes" comments.

Of course, by the end of the interview, she as back to bashing Trump.

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