It pays to claim you're 'oppressed' in America

Colin Kaepernick, the former NFL quarterback and the man at the center of the National Anthem controversy, claims to have started his protest because there is "oppression" of black people in America.

I suppose it depends on your definition of "oppression," because Kaepernick just cashed in.  He signed a million-dollar book deal where, presumably, he will detail how he has been "oppressed," first as an athlete earning millions of dollars, then as a celebrated personality, fulsomely  praised by the media and activists alike.

To paraphrase Shakespeare, if this be oppression, "give me excess of it."

Page Six:

Colin Kaepernick has inked a book deal worth just over $1 million with Random House imprint One World, Page Six has exclusively learned.

One World's headed by book world superstar Chris Jackson, who also publishes Jay-Zand Ta-Nehisi Coates. He launched One World last year.

Ex-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Kaepernick launched the current movement of NFL players protesting during the national anthem, and he's recently filed a controversial collusion grievance against league owners. He's still looking for a job in the NFL after opting out of his 49ers contract earlier this year.

His campaign began last year, but the issue of NFL player protests has reached a new fever pitch after President Trump weighed in.

Page Six previously reported that Kaepernick had been seen "taking meetings with publishers in the New York offices of WME" to shop the planned book. He's repped as an athlete by agent Carlos Fleming, and the book deal, we hear, went through Andy McNicol on the Hollywood agency lit department.

No doubt the film rights will bring additional wealth to the "oppressed" young man.

Meanings and definitions are important.  Without them, words become just a jumble of letters.  "Oppression" is one of those loaded words casually thrown about by racialists for no other reason than to gin up outrage over an exaggerated problem.

In America, if you stand up and say you're oppressed, you are feted in the media from one end of the country to the other; invited on TV; and, like Kaepernick, eventually given a book deal or a movie about your life.  DeRay McKisson, one of the leaders of Black Lives Matter, is another individual who has personally and financially benefited from telling the rest of us how oppressed he is.  He visited the Obama White House, lectured at Yale, and ran for mayor of Baltimore.  Now, really, how "oppressed" can you be to live that kind of life?

Conversely, if you stand up and say you're oppressed in North Korea, you are likely to be taken out, lined up against a wall, and shot.

That is true oppression.  And by massively exaggerating the concept of "oppression," Colin Kaepernick and his racialist allies spit in the face of some of the bravest people on the planet.  Thousands of individuals around the world – victims of true oppression – put their lives on the line to fight for freedom.  Claiming "oppression" in one of the freest nations on Earth is nonsense.

It is despicable that McKisson, Kaepernick, and other racialists have – to use one of their favorite terms – "appropriated" the word "oppression" for political purposes while activists in countries where they are dead serious about oppressing you risk everything for change.

Colin Kaepernick, the former NFL quarterback and the man at the center of the National Anthem controversy, claims to have started his protest because there is "oppression" of black people in America.

I suppose it depends on your definition of "oppression," because Kaepernick just cashed in.  He signed a million-dollar book deal where, presumably, he will detail how he has been "oppressed," first as an athlete earning millions of dollars, then as a celebrated personality, fulsomely  praised by the media and activists alike.

To paraphrase Shakespeare, if this be oppression, "give me excess of it."

Page Six:

Colin Kaepernick has inked a book deal worth just over $1 million with Random House imprint One World, Page Six has exclusively learned.

One World's headed by book world superstar Chris Jackson, who also publishes Jay-Zand Ta-Nehisi Coates. He launched One World last year.

Ex-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Kaepernick launched the current movement of NFL players protesting during the national anthem, and he's recently filed a controversial collusion grievance against league owners. He's still looking for a job in the NFL after opting out of his 49ers contract earlier this year.

His campaign began last year, but the issue of NFL player protests has reached a new fever pitch after President Trump weighed in.

Page Six previously reported that Kaepernick had been seen "taking meetings with publishers in the New York offices of WME" to shop the planned book. He's repped as an athlete by agent Carlos Fleming, and the book deal, we hear, went through Andy McNicol on the Hollywood agency lit department.

No doubt the film rights will bring additional wealth to the "oppressed" young man.

Meanings and definitions are important.  Without them, words become just a jumble of letters.  "Oppression" is one of those loaded words casually thrown about by racialists for no other reason than to gin up outrage over an exaggerated problem.

In America, if you stand up and say you're oppressed, you are feted in the media from one end of the country to the other; invited on TV; and, like Kaepernick, eventually given a book deal or a movie about your life.  DeRay McKisson, one of the leaders of Black Lives Matter, is another individual who has personally and financially benefited from telling the rest of us how oppressed he is.  He visited the Obama White House, lectured at Yale, and ran for mayor of Baltimore.  Now, really, how "oppressed" can you be to live that kind of life?

Conversely, if you stand up and say you're oppressed in North Korea, you are likely to be taken out, lined up against a wall, and shot.

That is true oppression.  And by massively exaggerating the concept of "oppression," Colin Kaepernick and his racialist allies spit in the face of some of the bravest people on the planet.  Thousands of individuals around the world – victims of true oppression – put their lives on the line to fight for freedom.  Claiming "oppression" in one of the freest nations on Earth is nonsense.

It is despicable that McKisson, Kaepernick, and other racialists have – to use one of their favorite terms – "appropriated" the word "oppression" for political purposes while activists in countries where they are dead serious about oppressing you risk everything for change.

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