California 2018 Senate primary shaping up as a bloody Democrat showdown

Democrats are deeply split into two factions.  The old guard, a gerontocracy that still runs the congressional caucuses, is white, liberal, and very, very old, or racialist.  The other faction is very progressive, if not outright socialist, younger, far left, and heavily minority, usually committed to identity politics.  Thanks to two recent announcements, we can look forward to an open slugging match between to the two factions on a vast scale, one that may last most of the year, through a springtime primary election and a general election in November.

First, ancient (84), rich (estimated net worth more than $40 million), white Dianne Feinstein announced that she would seek re-election.

Second, younger (50), powerful (he runs the California State Senate as president pro-tem), ambitious (he is term-limited in his state seat), and Hispanic Kevin de Leon announced that he will throw his hat into the ring and run against Feinstein in the primary for the Senate nomination.

So the national Democrats will watch as the aging establishment battles the vanguard of the NextGen Democrats – a party powered by the demographic transformation of the United States through mass unskilled immigration.

It will get ugly.

The fact that, in addition to being rich and white, Feinstein is Jewish will almost certainly be used against her, probably in venues mostly invisible to the MSM, which will do their best to ignore the Jew-hatred anyway.  The left is the new home of mass anti-Semitism.  Social media ads, phone calls, and maybe even fake news from Macedonian content farms would be among the preferred methods for exploiting bigotry.  It's the sort of opportunity to exacerbate the social divisions in America that would appeal to Moscow and any of our other enemies.

But even aside from the World's Oldest Hate, it will be ugly.  There is no small sense of resentment palpable among many Hispanic activists  toward the wealthier whites of the Golden State, and the Aztlán fantasy of kicking them out and proclaiming a bronze republic stirs many a heart as the flames of anger and resentment are continually fanned.

Here is the wild card: California voters adopted a "jungle primary" system via ballot initiative, meaning that the two top vote-getters in the primary face off against each other, regardless of party affiliation.  This means that in all likelihood, Feinstein will face de Leon twice, in the primary – which he might win, since the turnout will be lower and activists may predominate, choosing him – and again in the November election.

The National Democrats have to recognize the nominee, but will the DSCC put its money behind De Leon, if he grabs the prize?  Feinstein has her own resources and a lot of rich friends, and she is, after all, the incumbent.

The two races could cost tens of millions of dollars each and likely will be covered closely by the national media as a fight for the soul (as if!) of the Democratic Party.

If the GOP has any wit, it will focus on De Leon's radicalism to stimulate turnout down the ballot in November.  As Casey Nolan notes in the Mercury-News:

No major Republican elected officials in the state have said they're considering a Senate run. De León's entry raises the possibility of a November ballot with a governor's race and a Senate race between two Democrats. Some polls of the 2018 governor's race show two Democrats getting first and second place in that primary.

That could have a dire impact for the GOP on lower-ballot races like crucial Congressional races. "The challenge is how you turn out Republican voters where there's only a handful of places where they'll be able to elect a Republican," Eckery said.

There are seven congressional Districts in California that have GOP reps but voted for Hillary.  If Republican voters don't bother showing up, the party could lose all of them, and control of the House.  So it is essential to focus on De Leon as the face of the Democrats, in California and collaterally.  Then national media will help, drawn like moths to a flame to the story of the plutocrat versus the peon.

Make no mistake: the California state government is a disaster, corrupt, bloated, overpaid, and lavishly subsidizing an underclass, as it openly solicits illegals by declaring itself a "sanctuary state."  De Leon's fingerprints are all over shepherding it through, state Senate-approved, of course.  It is far from clear that a majority of Californians support this  move, since a poll found that 74 percent of them want an end to sanctuary cities.  The state government's moves receive little coverage outside a few newspapers, pre-eminently the Sacramento Bee.  Most people have no idea what goes on in Sacramento.

De Leon is smart, handsome, and a piece of work.  One little piece of his life story parallels that of young Obama morphing from Barry to Barack, with a multiracial family story, to boot:

The name on his birth certificate isn't Kevin de León.

That's how the Los Angeles Democrat identified himself more than two years ago when he was sworn in as the 47th president pro tem of the California Senate, the first Latino to hold the position in more than a century.

On his birth certificate and voter rolls, however, the 50-year-old politician is Kevin Alexander Leon.

Stay tuned.

Democrats are deeply split into two factions.  The old guard, a gerontocracy that still runs the congressional caucuses, is white, liberal, and very, very old, or racialist.  The other faction is very progressive, if not outright socialist, younger, far left, and heavily minority, usually committed to identity politics.  Thanks to two recent announcements, we can look forward to an open slugging match between to the two factions on a vast scale, one that may last most of the year, through a springtime primary election and a general election in November.

First, ancient (84), rich (estimated net worth more than $40 million), white Dianne Feinstein announced that she would seek re-election.

Second, younger (50), powerful (he runs the California State Senate as president pro-tem), ambitious (he is term-limited in his state seat), and Hispanic Kevin de Leon announced that he will throw his hat into the ring and run against Feinstein in the primary for the Senate nomination.

So the national Democrats will watch as the aging establishment battles the vanguard of the NextGen Democrats – a party powered by the demographic transformation of the United States through mass unskilled immigration.

It will get ugly.

The fact that, in addition to being rich and white, Feinstein is Jewish will almost certainly be used against her, probably in venues mostly invisible to the MSM, which will do their best to ignore the Jew-hatred anyway.  The left is the new home of mass anti-Semitism.  Social media ads, phone calls, and maybe even fake news from Macedonian content farms would be among the preferred methods for exploiting bigotry.  It's the sort of opportunity to exacerbate the social divisions in America that would appeal to Moscow and any of our other enemies.

But even aside from the World's Oldest Hate, it will be ugly.  There is no small sense of resentment palpable among many Hispanic activists  toward the wealthier whites of the Golden State, and the Aztlán fantasy of kicking them out and proclaiming a bronze republic stirs many a heart as the flames of anger and resentment are continually fanned.

Here is the wild card: California voters adopted a "jungle primary" system via ballot initiative, meaning that the two top vote-getters in the primary face off against each other, regardless of party affiliation.  This means that in all likelihood, Feinstein will face de Leon twice, in the primary – which he might win, since the turnout will be lower and activists may predominate, choosing him – and again in the November election.

The National Democrats have to recognize the nominee, but will the DSCC put its money behind De Leon, if he grabs the prize?  Feinstein has her own resources and a lot of rich friends, and she is, after all, the incumbent.

The two races could cost tens of millions of dollars each and likely will be covered closely by the national media as a fight for the soul (as if!) of the Democratic Party.

If the GOP has any wit, it will focus on De Leon's radicalism to stimulate turnout down the ballot in November.  As Casey Nolan notes in the Mercury-News:

No major Republican elected officials in the state have said they're considering a Senate run. De León's entry raises the possibility of a November ballot with a governor's race and a Senate race between two Democrats. Some polls of the 2018 governor's race show two Democrats getting first and second place in that primary.

That could have a dire impact for the GOP on lower-ballot races like crucial Congressional races. "The challenge is how you turn out Republican voters where there's only a handful of places where they'll be able to elect a Republican," Eckery said.

There are seven congressional Districts in California that have GOP reps but voted for Hillary.  If Republican voters don't bother showing up, the party could lose all of them, and control of the House.  So it is essential to focus on De Leon as the face of the Democrats, in California and collaterally.  Then national media will help, drawn like moths to a flame to the story of the plutocrat versus the peon.

Make no mistake: the California state government is a disaster, corrupt, bloated, overpaid, and lavishly subsidizing an underclass, as it openly solicits illegals by declaring itself a "sanctuary state."  De Leon's fingerprints are all over shepherding it through, state Senate-approved, of course.  It is far from clear that a majority of Californians support this  move, since a poll found that 74 percent of them want an end to sanctuary cities.  The state government's moves receive little coverage outside a few newspapers, pre-eminently the Sacramento Bee.  Most people have no idea what goes on in Sacramento.

De Leon is smart, handsome, and a piece of work.  One little piece of his life story parallels that of young Obama morphing from Barry to Barack, with a multiracial family story, to boot:

The name on his birth certificate isn't Kevin de León.

That's how the Los Angeles Democrat identified himself more than two years ago when he was sworn in as the 47th president pro tem of the California Senate, the first Latino to hold the position in more than a century.

On his birth certificate and voter rolls, however, the 50-year-old politician is Kevin Alexander Leon.

Stay tuned.

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