USC on DACA: More money than brains

The University of Southern California's student government has forked out $10,000 to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals students to pay their renewal fees due within six months.  The idea is to protest President Trump's ending of DACA.  Ten thousand divided by the $500 renewal fee should cover 20 DACA renewals.

One problem: In less than four weeks, the Trump administration is no longer taking such renewal applications.  Renewals take place two years after a DACA recipient has gotten that status, because DACA status is good for only two years under President Obama's executive order.  According to Campus Reform, the "emergency fund" is there to pay the $500 fee to ensure that the renewal applications are made by the Oct. 5 renewal deadline even if they are really due six months out.  One wonders if the government will even accept such applications made that far ahead of the actual time they are set for renewal.  Does the DMV renew drivers' licenses that far ahead?  It's hard to imagine bureaucrats doing this.

What it goes to show is that leftists will throw money at any problem even if they know that money won't solve it.  At USC, that money is plentiful.  Based all the high fees legal students are socked with, there's no way it wouldn't be.  Now the cash is going to a select group of illegals who could just as easily be educated at universities in their home countries, where state education is free, instead of to programs that would benefit everyone.

It calls into question why the cash was set aside.  DACA recipients, and there are 800,000 of them, have never had any trouble coming up with the money to pay for their application or renewal fees.  They've never even had much problem qualifying, given the 94% acceptance rate.  Compared to the fees legal immigrants pay, five hundred bucks for a work permit, a Social Security number, some welfare programs, and legal status is a cheap bargain, and up until now, they have always been able to come up with it.  Now they're not, and the USC student government is happy it got to protest Trump.

This just goes to show that USC has more money that it knows what to do with, and that money exceeds the brainpower of the USC student government.

The University of Southern California's student government has forked out $10,000 to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals students to pay their renewal fees due within six months.  The idea is to protest President Trump's ending of DACA.  Ten thousand divided by the $500 renewal fee should cover 20 DACA renewals.

One problem: In less than four weeks, the Trump administration is no longer taking such renewal applications.  Renewals take place two years after a DACA recipient has gotten that status, because DACA status is good for only two years under President Obama's executive order.  According to Campus Reform, the "emergency fund" is there to pay the $500 fee to ensure that the renewal applications are made by the Oct. 5 renewal deadline even if they are really due six months out.  One wonders if the government will even accept such applications made that far ahead of the actual time they are set for renewal.  Does the DMV renew drivers' licenses that far ahead?  It's hard to imagine bureaucrats doing this.

What it goes to show is that leftists will throw money at any problem even if they know that money won't solve it.  At USC, that money is plentiful.  Based all the high fees legal students are socked with, there's no way it wouldn't be.  Now the cash is going to a select group of illegals who could just as easily be educated at universities in their home countries, where state education is free, instead of to programs that would benefit everyone.

It calls into question why the cash was set aside.  DACA recipients, and there are 800,000 of them, have never had any trouble coming up with the money to pay for their application or renewal fees.  They've never even had much problem qualifying, given the 94% acceptance rate.  Compared to the fees legal immigrants pay, five hundred bucks for a work permit, a Social Security number, some welfare programs, and legal status is a cheap bargain, and up until now, they have always been able to come up with it.  Now they're not, and the USC student government is happy it got to protest Trump.

This just goes to show that USC has more money that it knows what to do with, and that money exceeds the brainpower of the USC student government.

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