How about some sympathy for legal immigrants?

Let me confess that the "sympathy for DREAMers" tune is starting to get on my nerves.  There is nothing more annoying than saturation, and we may be close to that.

Please don't get me wrong.  I think that should legalize some of these young people within certain parameters.

At the same time, the constant "let's feel sorry" refrain overlooks others for whom we should show a little sympathy, too.

How about the people waiting to come legally into the U.S.?  In fact, there are lots of them, as William La Jeunesse reported recently:

The waiting list for those trying to enter the U.S. legally now stands at 4.4 million, 100,000 more than last year.

Some have been on the list for more than 15 years.

Even though the spouses and children of U.S citizens are supposed to get priority, even their wait times have jumped from as little as two months to up 18 months as the administration deals with a surge of illegal immigrants given lawful status by President Obama.

"I've had people tell me, 'Why don't you just show up at the border and try to get across?'" said Gugliotta. "I say, 'No, we want to do this thing right.'"

Doing the right thing?  I had not heard that one in a long time.  You mean "doing the right thing" like respecting U.S. immigration laws?  Like my parents did?  We spent 90 days after leaving Cuba waiting for the U.S. to grant us legal access.

My point is that the Democrats, and especially many in the media, are going a bit overboard with the sympathy factor for DREAMers.

Again, I do sympathize with a 20-year-old who was brought here illegally when he was three.  I've met real cases like that and would consider opening the door to such a person.  Some of these young people are indeed in a bit of an identity crisis living illegally in the only country they really know.

At the same time, it would be nice if the media would spend some time interviewing the families of those who are waiting to "do the right thing."

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Let me confess that the "sympathy for DREAMers" tune is starting to get on my nerves.  There is nothing more annoying than saturation, and we may be close to that.

Please don't get me wrong.  I think that should legalize some of these young people within certain parameters.

At the same time, the constant "let's feel sorry" refrain overlooks others for whom we should show a little sympathy, too.

How about the people waiting to come legally into the U.S.?  In fact, there are lots of them, as William La Jeunesse reported recently:

The waiting list for those trying to enter the U.S. legally now stands at 4.4 million, 100,000 more than last year.

Some have been on the list for more than 15 years.

Even though the spouses and children of U.S citizens are supposed to get priority, even their wait times have jumped from as little as two months to up 18 months as the administration deals with a surge of illegal immigrants given lawful status by President Obama.

"I've had people tell me, 'Why don't you just show up at the border and try to get across?'" said Gugliotta. "I say, 'No, we want to do this thing right.'"

Doing the right thing?  I had not heard that one in a long time.  You mean "doing the right thing" like respecting U.S. immigration laws?  Like my parents did?  We spent 90 days after leaving Cuba waiting for the U.S. to grant us legal access.

My point is that the Democrats, and especially many in the media, are going a bit overboard with the sympathy factor for DREAMers.

Again, I do sympathize with a 20-year-old who was brought here illegally when he was three.  I've met real cases like that and would consider opening the door to such a person.  Some of these young people are indeed in a bit of an identity crisis living illegally in the only country they really know.

At the same time, it would be nice if the media would spend some time interviewing the families of those who are waiting to "do the right thing."

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

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