At the Emmys, Hollywood's eminentos make fools of themselves

If  anyone wants to see how important Hollywood believes it is compared to the rest of us, including the president and politicians, all you have to hear is Alec Baldwin's acceptance speech at Sunday night's Emmy awards.

Here is some of what he said:

I just want to say if I leave anybody out, I'm sorry, but I do want to get this in. Which is I always remember what someone told me, that is when you die, you don't remember a bill that Congress passed or a decision the Supreme Court made or an address made by the president. You remember a song. You remember a line from a movie. You remember a play. You remember a book, a painting, a poem. What we do is important. And for all of you out there in motion pictures and television, don't stop doing what you're doing. The audience is counting on you.

I happen to believe that we remember the Gettysburg Address, Lincoln's freeing of the slaves, the Constitution, women's right to vote, civil rights laws, Roe v. Wade, Medicare, Medicaid, etc. more than anything Baldwin and other actors have done.  But to Baldwin, what Hollywood does is important, and the rest of us don't matter much.

Can anyone remember who won the Emmys, Oscars, Grammys, or Tonys last year?  I bet many more know that Kennedy said, "Ask not what the country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country" than any line in a movie, television show, or song from last year.

Baldwin wasn't the only one issuing this kind of nonsense.  One by one, quite a few Hollywood geniuses managed to get their licks in on Trump hate, racism, and how wonderful the entertainment industry is.

Hollywood's one-trick pony, Stephen Colbert, anti-Trump all the time, says that in the Emmys, the popular vote wins.  There are only 21,000 eligible voters for the Emmys (and I wonder how many actually vote).  If the popular vote actually won, shows with the highest ratings would win.  NCIS, Bull, Big Bang Theory, and other highly rated shows aren't even nominated.  Instead, we get repeat winners from shows most of us have never seen.  I believe that the poor and lower middle class are absolutely oppressed because almost all nominations are for channels that cost extra money.

Maybe someone should point out to Colbert that Trump won 30 out of 50 states and almost 90% of counties.  If not for the big cities, where Democrats have done their best to oppress minorities and make them dependent on government, Trump would have won the popular vote by a landslide.

The founding fathers knew that you had to give all states a stake in the elections, not just states with large populations, which is why we have the Electoral College.  I would think minorities and especially gays and transgenders would be thankful that the majority doesn't always rule.

Donald Glover won an Emmy, too, and like the others, had the same Hollywood attitude.  Here is his brilliant comment:

I want to thank Trump for making black people number one on the most oppressed list. He's the reason I'm probably up here.

I thought it was women, gays, Hispanics, and Muslims that Trump was oppressing the most, but I guess it is blacks.

I would challenge Glover, Hollywood, and actors as a whole and all reporters to come up with a list of things that Obama and the Democrats did to allow blacks and other minorities to move up the economic ladder during Obama's eight years in office.  I can't think of any.  I can think of many things they did to make minorities more dependent on government but nothing to actually move up, and there is nothing progressive about making more people dependent on the government.

Then there's Jane Fonda.  Isn't it great to be lectured by Jane Fonda about anything?

It is amazing how important these Hollywood actors and entertainers believe they are in setting an agenda.  That was such a tough audience to tell Trump jokes to.  If they were good actors and comedians, they would have tested their skills by telling Hillary and Obama jokes.

If  anyone wants to see how important Hollywood believes it is compared to the rest of us, including the president and politicians, all you have to hear is Alec Baldwin's acceptance speech at Sunday night's Emmy awards.

Here is some of what he said:

I just want to say if I leave anybody out, I'm sorry, but I do want to get this in. Which is I always remember what someone told me, that is when you die, you don't remember a bill that Congress passed or a decision the Supreme Court made or an address made by the president. You remember a song. You remember a line from a movie. You remember a play. You remember a book, a painting, a poem. What we do is important. And for all of you out there in motion pictures and television, don't stop doing what you're doing. The audience is counting on you.

I happen to believe that we remember the Gettysburg Address, Lincoln's freeing of the slaves, the Constitution, women's right to vote, civil rights laws, Roe v. Wade, Medicare, Medicaid, etc. more than anything Baldwin and other actors have done.  But to Baldwin, what Hollywood does is important, and the rest of us don't matter much.

Can anyone remember who won the Emmys, Oscars, Grammys, or Tonys last year?  I bet many more know that Kennedy said, "Ask not what the country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country" than any line in a movie, television show, or song from last year.

Baldwin wasn't the only one issuing this kind of nonsense.  One by one, quite a few Hollywood geniuses managed to get their licks in on Trump hate, racism, and how wonderful the entertainment industry is.

Hollywood's one-trick pony, Stephen Colbert, anti-Trump all the time, says that in the Emmys, the popular vote wins.  There are only 21,000 eligible voters for the Emmys (and I wonder how many actually vote).  If the popular vote actually won, shows with the highest ratings would win.  NCIS, Bull, Big Bang Theory, and other highly rated shows aren't even nominated.  Instead, we get repeat winners from shows most of us have never seen.  I believe that the poor and lower middle class are absolutely oppressed because almost all nominations are for channels that cost extra money.

Maybe someone should point out to Colbert that Trump won 30 out of 50 states and almost 90% of counties.  If not for the big cities, where Democrats have done their best to oppress minorities and make them dependent on government, Trump would have won the popular vote by a landslide.

The founding fathers knew that you had to give all states a stake in the elections, not just states with large populations, which is why we have the Electoral College.  I would think minorities and especially gays and transgenders would be thankful that the majority doesn't always rule.

Donald Glover won an Emmy, too, and like the others, had the same Hollywood attitude.  Here is his brilliant comment:

I want to thank Trump for making black people number one on the most oppressed list. He's the reason I'm probably up here.

I thought it was women, gays, Hispanics, and Muslims that Trump was oppressing the most, but I guess it is blacks.

I would challenge Glover, Hollywood, and actors as a whole and all reporters to come up with a list of things that Obama and the Democrats did to allow blacks and other minorities to move up the economic ladder during Obama's eight years in office.  I can't think of any.  I can think of many things they did to make minorities more dependent on government but nothing to actually move up, and there is nothing progressive about making more people dependent on the government.

Then there's Jane Fonda.  Isn't it great to be lectured by Jane Fonda about anything?

It is amazing how important these Hollywood actors and entertainers believe they are in setting an agenda.  That was such a tough audience to tell Trump jokes to.  If they were good actors and comedians, they would have tested their skills by telling Hillary and Obama jokes.

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