US bombs roads to prevent ISIS convoy from evacuating Syrian-Lebanese border

The U.S. bombed the road being used by a convoy of ISIS fighters and their families who had been granted transit to the Syria-Iraq border by the government of Lebanon and Hezb'allah.

The Lebanese government negotiated a ceasefire with ISIS on Sunday after declaring "victory" over the terrorists.  As part of the deal, they allowed 600 ISIS fighters and their families safe passage from the Syria-Lebanese border to an ISIS-controlled area near the Syrian border with Iraq.  Lebanon hopes to begin negotiations with ISIS for the return of nine soldiers held by the terrorists since 2014.

The U.S. did not sign off on the deal – and neither did Iraq, which wasn't thrilled by the prospect of hundreds of ISIS fighters being dropped off so close to its border.

CNN:

US officials confirmed the airstrikes took place to prevent buses carrying armed ISIS fighters continuing eastward.

Coalition spokesman Col. Ryan Dillon told CNN that the "coalition conducted air strikes to stop a convoy of ISIS fighters and their families from reaching an ISIS-held area in eastern Syria from the Lebanese border under a truce deal." He added that "the coalition has not struck the convoy. In accordance with the law of armed conflict, the coalition will take action against ISIS whenever and wherever we are able to without harming civilians"

"The coalition is not a party to the agreement between Lebanese Hezbollah and ISIS. Russian and pro-regime counter-ISIS words ring hollow when they allow known terrorists to transit territory under their control," Pentagon spokesman Eric Pahon told CNN.

"ISIS is a global threat; relocating terrorists from one place to another for someone else to deal with is not a lasting solution," Pahon added, saying "the coalition is monitoring the movement of these fighters in real-time. In accordance with the law of armed conflict, the coalition will take action against ISIS whenever and wherever we are able to."

Iraq's Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi and the Kurdish leadership condemned the ceasefire deal after it was announced.

"We are not happy with the deal and we consider it a mistake by transferring territories to an area nearby the Syrian-Iraqi border," he said at a news conference in Baghdad Tuesday."ISIS is dying and we should not give it a chance to breathe," al Abadi added.

Hezb'allah, which has the Lebanese government under its thumb, doesn't care if several hundred ISIS fighters infiltrate back into Iraq to fight the Iraqi military.  The important element in the ceasefire for them is that it frees their own fighters to battle insurgents farther south.

Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi  certainly has the right attitude: don't give ISIS a chance to regroup somewhere else.  The U.S. military agrees and will try and prevent the convoy from leaving the Lebanese border. 

But as long as ISIS is traveling with women and children, we aren't likely to bomb the convoy itself.  This presents itself as an Iraqi problem that Baghdad is going to have to deal with eventually.

The U.S. bombed the road being used by a convoy of ISIS fighters and their families who had been granted transit to the Syria-Iraq border by the government of Lebanon and Hezb'allah.

The Lebanese government negotiated a ceasefire with ISIS on Sunday after declaring "victory" over the terrorists.  As part of the deal, they allowed 600 ISIS fighters and their families safe passage from the Syria-Lebanese border to an ISIS-controlled area near the Syrian border with Iraq.  Lebanon hopes to begin negotiations with ISIS for the return of nine soldiers held by the terrorists since 2014.

The U.S. did not sign off on the deal – and neither did Iraq, which wasn't thrilled by the prospect of hundreds of ISIS fighters being dropped off so close to its border.

CNN:

US officials confirmed the airstrikes took place to prevent buses carrying armed ISIS fighters continuing eastward.

Coalition spokesman Col. Ryan Dillon told CNN that the "coalition conducted air strikes to stop a convoy of ISIS fighters and their families from reaching an ISIS-held area in eastern Syria from the Lebanese border under a truce deal." He added that "the coalition has not struck the convoy. In accordance with the law of armed conflict, the coalition will take action against ISIS whenever and wherever we are able to without harming civilians"

"The coalition is not a party to the agreement between Lebanese Hezbollah and ISIS. Russian and pro-regime counter-ISIS words ring hollow when they allow known terrorists to transit territory under their control," Pentagon spokesman Eric Pahon told CNN.

"ISIS is a global threat; relocating terrorists from one place to another for someone else to deal with is not a lasting solution," Pahon added, saying "the coalition is monitoring the movement of these fighters in real-time. In accordance with the law of armed conflict, the coalition will take action against ISIS whenever and wherever we are able to."

Iraq's Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi and the Kurdish leadership condemned the ceasefire deal after it was announced.

"We are not happy with the deal and we consider it a mistake by transferring territories to an area nearby the Syrian-Iraqi border," he said at a news conference in Baghdad Tuesday."ISIS is dying and we should not give it a chance to breathe," al Abadi added.

Hezb'allah, which has the Lebanese government under its thumb, doesn't care if several hundred ISIS fighters infiltrate back into Iraq to fight the Iraqi military.  The important element in the ceasefire for them is that it frees their own fighters to battle insurgents farther south.

Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi  certainly has the right attitude: don't give ISIS a chance to regroup somewhere else.  The U.S. military agrees and will try and prevent the convoy from leaving the Lebanese border. 

But as long as ISIS is traveling with women and children, we aren't likely to bomb the convoy itself.  This presents itself as an Iraqi problem that Baghdad is going to have to deal with eventually.

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