Trump aide Manigault shouted down at black journalist conference

Former "Apprentice" contestant and White House aide Omarosa Manigault appeared on a "Black and Blue" panel at the National Association of Black Journalists convention and was continously shouted down by the audience.

Manigault got into several heated exchanges with the moderator, Bounce TV's Ed Gordon, who refused to respond to her statements and encouraged the chaos that engulfed the panel.

CNN:

Gordon pressed Manigault about her role as director of communications for the White House's Office of Public Liaison and her views on the current state of the criminal justice system. Manigault began by talking about the deaths of her father and brother at the hands of violence in Ohio.

But when asked by Gordon how she "could sit in a White House" while Trump signaled support for police brutality -- a nod to Trump's recent remarks encouraging the police to be rougher when arresting criminal suspects -- Manigault accused the host of lecturing her and being "too aggressive."

"Are you suggesting that I just walk away?" Manigault said.

She continued, "I'm not going to stand here and defend every single word and decision. I still have my story -- you're dismissing my family story."

Manigault is a former contestant on Trump's reality TV show "The Apprentice." Her role in the White House includes advocating on issues important to African-Americans.

During the lengthy exchange, Manigault threatened multiple times to leave while Gordon insisted, speaking mostly to the audience, that he "did my best to try to make this as civil as possible."

Manigault side-stepped questions related to her role in the White House and her own views on Trump's remarks, though ultimately she said she felt his comments about policing had been out of line.

Here are a couple of video snippets of what Maginault was facing.

Heavy.com:

Gordon told the audience, which filled a packed room, from the start that Omarosa “has requested to not be alone on the stage. She’s brave to go into the lion’s den.” He stressed that things needed to stay civil. However, when she did take the stage, discourse immediately grew heated between Omarosa and Gordon. By the end of the event, Gordon called things a “quagmire.” He said he was trying to keep decorum from the minute he walked in the room.

Omarosa said she was “not going to back down on my story” because some people don’t like Donald Trump. She added that the Justice Department is not part of her White House portfolio. “We need to stop the violence,” she said at another point. “I don’t think any other 7-year-old like myself should have to stand at the casket of their father.”

She added of her life story, “Most people don’t know my background.” As Gordon tried to turn the conversation, at times, to the Trump administration’s policies, Omarosa would, at times, turn the conversation back to her family’s story and tragedies. Other panelists challenged Omarosa a few times, but the panel was mostly conversation between Omarosa and Gordon.

Black group think must prevent any ideas that don't conform to the dominant liberal narrative from polluting the minds of adherents. This much has been clear for decades. One of the brightest black politicians of his generation, J.C. Watts of Oklahoma, was constantly branded an "Uncle Tom" for his conservative advocacy. An accomplished woman, Condaleeza Rice, was dismissed by the racialists for her membership in the GOP. Blacks may present a united front, but the way it's achieved is by crushing any dissent.

Manigault held her own very well despite the vocal opposition from the moderator and the crowd. Instead of celebrating her achievements, the crowd of  black journalists turned their backs and shouted down a beautiful, poised black woman who could be a role model, especially for black girls.

 

 

Former "Apprentice" contestant and White House aide Omarosa Manigault appeared on a "Black and Blue" panel at the National Association of Black Journalists convention and was continously shouted down by the audience.

Manigault got into several heated exchanges with the moderator, Bounce TV's Ed Gordon, who refused to respond to her statements and encouraged the chaos that engulfed the panel.

CNN:

Gordon pressed Manigault about her role as director of communications for the White House's Office of Public Liaison and her views on the current state of the criminal justice system. Manigault began by talking about the deaths of her father and brother at the hands of violence in Ohio.

But when asked by Gordon how she "could sit in a White House" while Trump signaled support for police brutality -- a nod to Trump's recent remarks encouraging the police to be rougher when arresting criminal suspects -- Manigault accused the host of lecturing her and being "too aggressive."

"Are you suggesting that I just walk away?" Manigault said.

She continued, "I'm not going to stand here and defend every single word and decision. I still have my story -- you're dismissing my family story."

Manigault is a former contestant on Trump's reality TV show "The Apprentice." Her role in the White House includes advocating on issues important to African-Americans.

During the lengthy exchange, Manigault threatened multiple times to leave while Gordon insisted, speaking mostly to the audience, that he "did my best to try to make this as civil as possible."

Manigault side-stepped questions related to her role in the White House and her own views on Trump's remarks, though ultimately she said she felt his comments about policing had been out of line.

Here are a couple of video snippets of what Maginault was facing.

Heavy.com:

Gordon told the audience, which filled a packed room, from the start that Omarosa “has requested to not be alone on the stage. She’s brave to go into the lion’s den.” He stressed that things needed to stay civil. However, when she did take the stage, discourse immediately grew heated between Omarosa and Gordon. By the end of the event, Gordon called things a “quagmire.” He said he was trying to keep decorum from the minute he walked in the room.

Omarosa said she was “not going to back down on my story” because some people don’t like Donald Trump. She added that the Justice Department is not part of her White House portfolio. “We need to stop the violence,” she said at another point. “I don’t think any other 7-year-old like myself should have to stand at the casket of their father.”

She added of her life story, “Most people don’t know my background.” As Gordon tried to turn the conversation, at times, to the Trump administration’s policies, Omarosa would, at times, turn the conversation back to her family’s story and tragedies. Other panelists challenged Omarosa a few times, but the panel was mostly conversation between Omarosa and Gordon.

Black group think must prevent any ideas that don't conform to the dominant liberal narrative from polluting the minds of adherents. This much has been clear for decades. One of the brightest black politicians of his generation, J.C. Watts of Oklahoma, was constantly branded an "Uncle Tom" for his conservative advocacy. An accomplished woman, Condaleeza Rice, was dismissed by the racialists for her membership in the GOP. Blacks may present a united front, but the way it's achieved is by crushing any dissent.

Manigault held her own very well despite the vocal opposition from the moderator and the crowd. Instead of celebrating her achievements, the crowd of  black journalists turned their backs and shouted down a beautiful, poised black woman who could be a role model, especially for black girls.

 

 

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