The Swamp: Embattled Eric Bolling speaks out

The Swamp, by bestselling author and Fox News Channel host Eric Bolling, reveals a scandalous history of American politics, past and present, Republican and Democrat.  It discusses bribery, blackmail, horrific personal conduct, and bullying – but it also shows how the media play into all of this and, in some sense, feed on it.

Although the jury is still out, it appears that those whom he accuses as part of the Swamp are targeting Eric Bolling.  Huffington Post reporter Yashar Ali wrote that several years ago, he sent "unsolicited photos of male genitalia" via text messages to two colleagues at Fox Business and one at Fox News.  Ali claimed he spoke to fourteen sources "in and out of Fox News and Fox Business, all of whom spoke on condition of anonymity" and maintained that they knew that it was Bolling because "they recognized his number from previous work-related and informal interaction."  One of the recipients said Bolling never replied to her text telling him never to send her such photos again.

Is this just another case of the left attacking with the infamous anonymous source?  Michael J. Bowe, Bolling's attorney, told American Thinker, "The anonymous, uncorroborated claims are untrue and terribly unfair.  We intend to fully cooperate with the investigation so that it can be concluded and Eric can return to work as quickly as possible."  Ali was contacted via email but basically gave a "no comment."

Major questions remain about the story.  How did Ali come by the information?  Why didn't the women come out publicly?  Did Ali attempt to verify any of the information, including the picture and cell number?  And if it occurred several years ago, why did the information come out now?

It seems unlikely that Bolling would do such a crude act.  He spends a majority of the book detailing the immoral and corrupt tendencies of the Swamp creatures, as he calls them.  "The Washington elite are as irresponsible about sex as they are about balancing the federal budget."  Bolling cites Anthony Weiner as an example detailing Weiner's many sexting escapades.

Considering that this book is in the top twenty on the New York Times bestseller list, could those who supposedly outed Bolling have another agenda?  After all, he talks about how both sides of the aisle need draining.  He told American Thinker, "Just look at the health care debate.  This is the most definitive example of defining how the Swamp operates.  For seven years, Republicans complained about Obamacare, and look what happened when they had their chance.  Did they use this opportunity to have competition across state lines, bring down drug pricing, tort reform, and competition between hospitals?  I think they were being lobbied hard by the health insurance companies, the pharmaceuticals.  No wonder they have not changed anything."

He went on to say he considers "John McCain a war hero and an American patriot, but it is time for him to retire.  He came across country to put the health care bill up for debate only to vote it down.  This shows me he became an obstructionist GOP senator, not a maverick."  Bolling has a good point, considering that a maverick does not just have wishful thinking about bipartisanship and doesn't vote no, but actually has solutions.  A quote from the book applies: "Washington is full of people who behave oddly because they are intoxicated by their own power and by proximity to other people with power."

Bolling is hoping that Americans get behind President Trump and suggests ways Trump can drain the Swamp.  "He should treat the Oval Office as a boardroom.  He needs to weigh the costs and benefits of each and every program [and] department.  Dialing back regulations is very important.  Many of the regulations imposed by President Obama have suppressed new business creation, hindered international trade, and prevented job growth.  Next, he should focus on reducing foreign aid commitment, reducing the national debt, and repairing our infrastructure.  Finally, all the scoundrels should be thrown out of Washington.  The disgusting revolving door between working in government and becoming a lobbyist has taken on a toll on ingenuity and fostered a pay-to-play environment."

He also believes that those working in government must be put in the same position as every American.  "They receive a massive subsidy that reduces their insurance to about 30% of what the average American must pay.  Another example: They can trade on insider information.  Let's say they know a company will get a drug approved by the FDA.  Those in Congress can buy stock in it and make a profit.  But this is insider trading, and any other American who did it would go to jail."

The Swamp is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the corruption within Washington, including some in the press corps.  Democrat or Republican, liberal or conservative, male or female, every American needs to understand the great lengths "the creatures of the Swamp" will go to to maintain their power and agenda, including what appear to be unsubstantiated innuendos against this author. 

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews and author interviews and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.

The Swamp, by bestselling author and Fox News Channel host Eric Bolling, reveals a scandalous history of American politics, past and present, Republican and Democrat.  It discusses bribery, blackmail, horrific personal conduct, and bullying – but it also shows how the media play into all of this and, in some sense, feed on it.

Although the jury is still out, it appears that those whom he accuses as part of the Swamp are targeting Eric Bolling.  Huffington Post reporter Yashar Ali wrote that several years ago, he sent "unsolicited photos of male genitalia" via text messages to two colleagues at Fox Business and one at Fox News.  Ali claimed he spoke to fourteen sources "in and out of Fox News and Fox Business, all of whom spoke on condition of anonymity" and maintained that they knew that it was Bolling because "they recognized his number from previous work-related and informal interaction."  One of the recipients said Bolling never replied to her text telling him never to send her such photos again.

Is this just another case of the left attacking with the infamous anonymous source?  Michael J. Bowe, Bolling's attorney, told American Thinker, "The anonymous, uncorroborated claims are untrue and terribly unfair.  We intend to fully cooperate with the investigation so that it can be concluded and Eric can return to work as quickly as possible."  Ali was contacted via email but basically gave a "no comment."

Major questions remain about the story.  How did Ali come by the information?  Why didn't the women come out publicly?  Did Ali attempt to verify any of the information, including the picture and cell number?  And if it occurred several years ago, why did the information come out now?

It seems unlikely that Bolling would do such a crude act.  He spends a majority of the book detailing the immoral and corrupt tendencies of the Swamp creatures, as he calls them.  "The Washington elite are as irresponsible about sex as they are about balancing the federal budget."  Bolling cites Anthony Weiner as an example detailing Weiner's many sexting escapades.

Considering that this book is in the top twenty on the New York Times bestseller list, could those who supposedly outed Bolling have another agenda?  After all, he talks about how both sides of the aisle need draining.  He told American Thinker, "Just look at the health care debate.  This is the most definitive example of defining how the Swamp operates.  For seven years, Republicans complained about Obamacare, and look what happened when they had their chance.  Did they use this opportunity to have competition across state lines, bring down drug pricing, tort reform, and competition between hospitals?  I think they were being lobbied hard by the health insurance companies, the pharmaceuticals.  No wonder they have not changed anything."

He went on to say he considers "John McCain a war hero and an American patriot, but it is time for him to retire.  He came across country to put the health care bill up for debate only to vote it down.  This shows me he became an obstructionist GOP senator, not a maverick."  Bolling has a good point, considering that a maverick does not just have wishful thinking about bipartisanship and doesn't vote no, but actually has solutions.  A quote from the book applies: "Washington is full of people who behave oddly because they are intoxicated by their own power and by proximity to other people with power."

Bolling is hoping that Americans get behind President Trump and suggests ways Trump can drain the Swamp.  "He should treat the Oval Office as a boardroom.  He needs to weigh the costs and benefits of each and every program [and] department.  Dialing back regulations is very important.  Many of the regulations imposed by President Obama have suppressed new business creation, hindered international trade, and prevented job growth.  Next, he should focus on reducing foreign aid commitment, reducing the national debt, and repairing our infrastructure.  Finally, all the scoundrels should be thrown out of Washington.  The disgusting revolving door between working in government and becoming a lobbyist has taken on a toll on ingenuity and fostered a pay-to-play environment."

He also believes that those working in government must be put in the same position as every American.  "They receive a massive subsidy that reduces their insurance to about 30% of what the average American must pay.  Another example: They can trade on insider information.  Let's say they know a company will get a drug approved by the FDA.  Those in Congress can buy stock in it and make a profit.  But this is insider trading, and any other American who did it would go to jail."

The Swamp is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the corruption within Washington, including some in the press corps.  Democrat or Republican, liberal or conservative, male or female, every American needs to understand the great lengths "the creatures of the Swamp" will go to to maintain their power and agenda, including what appear to be unsubstantiated innuendos against this author. 

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews and author interviews and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.

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