Chicago had 14,000 more votes than voters in 2016 general election

President Trump continues to receive scorn over his assertion last year that vote fraud accounted for Hillary Clinton's raw vote majority.  Democrats and their shills are unanimous in denouncing the "false claims."  (The Amazon Washington Post recently called it a "zombie claim.")  When the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity was announced, it was denounced as a waste, an attempt to intimidate minorities, and a scheme to violate privacy, which has caused states to refuse to release public data requested by the commission.  Its investigator, J. Christian Adams, is being vilified.  Even Republicans expressed reluctance to Politico over the investigation.

Senator Chuck Schumer bizarrely linked vote fraud to Charlottesville.

In the wake of the confrontation in Charlottesville, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) called for President Trump to disband the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity on Aug. 24. In a Medium post, Schumer said the actions of the commission were "wolves in sheep's clothing" and a "ruse" designed to "revive the old playbook and disenfranchise minority voters."

They really, really don't want anyone looking closely at vote fraud.  They claim there is none of any significance.

That must be why this report from Chicago City Wire has been so thoroughly ignored by the mainstream media:

More than 14,000 votes were cast in Chicago during the 2016 general election than there were voters to cast them, based on separate figures released by the Chicago Board of Elections, the chairman of the Chicago Republican Party has reported.

Chris Cleveland told the Chicago Wire that "on a whim," he filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the board, which provided him with a list of 1,101,178 people who voted in the general election. An earlier post on the board's website said that 1,115,664 votes had been cast.

"There should be never be more votes than voters," Cleveland said. "Every ballot cast should be recorded against a registered voter."

The party did a breakdown of voting by precinct, and Cleveland said it found an uneven distribution of discrepancies. Fifteen precincts had 100 more ballots cast than voters, while others had fewer votes than voters. 

Judicial Watch is also on the case:

Washington-based Judicial Watch named Illinois among 11 states that have another kind of discrepancy in their voting rolls: The number of registered voters exceeds the number of voting-age citizens as determined by a review of Census data.

In April, the group sent a notice-of-violation letter along with a threat to sue the 11 states.

Robert Popper, director of Judicial Watch's Election Integrity Project and formerly deputy chief of the voting section of the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department, said that not maintaining accurate voting rolls violates the National Voter Registration Act of 1993.

"People remember the act as the 'motor voter' law because it requires the states to offer voter registration forms with driver license applications," Popper said. "But what a lot of people forget is that as a compromise for getting the act through, it requires states to maintain accurate voting rolls."

Judicial Watch identified 26 Illinois counties where voter registration was higher than the number of people eligible to vote, according to Census numbers.

But we can expect that Democrats will continue to dismiss the possibility that vote fraud worked for them on a significant scale.  The fact that they resist investigation is telling.

Hat tip: Peter von Buol

President Trump continues to receive scorn over his assertion last year that vote fraud accounted for Hillary Clinton's raw vote majority.  Democrats and their shills are unanimous in denouncing the "false claims."  (The Amazon Washington Post recently called it a "zombie claim.")  When the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity was announced, it was denounced as a waste, an attempt to intimidate minorities, and a scheme to violate privacy, which has caused states to refuse to release public data requested by the commission.  Its investigator, J. Christian Adams, is being vilified.  Even Republicans expressed reluctance to Politico over the investigation.

Senator Chuck Schumer bizarrely linked vote fraud to Charlottesville.

In the wake of the confrontation in Charlottesville, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) called for President Trump to disband the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity on Aug. 24. In a Medium post, Schumer said the actions of the commission were "wolves in sheep's clothing" and a "ruse" designed to "revive the old playbook and disenfranchise minority voters."

They really, really don't want anyone looking closely at vote fraud.  They claim there is none of any significance.

That must be why this report from Chicago City Wire has been so thoroughly ignored by the mainstream media:

More than 14,000 votes were cast in Chicago during the 2016 general election than there were voters to cast them, based on separate figures released by the Chicago Board of Elections, the chairman of the Chicago Republican Party has reported.

Chris Cleveland told the Chicago Wire that "on a whim," he filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the board, which provided him with a list of 1,101,178 people who voted in the general election. An earlier post on the board's website said that 1,115,664 votes had been cast.

"There should be never be more votes than voters," Cleveland said. "Every ballot cast should be recorded against a registered voter."

The party did a breakdown of voting by precinct, and Cleveland said it found an uneven distribution of discrepancies. Fifteen precincts had 100 more ballots cast than voters, while others had fewer votes than voters. 

Judicial Watch is also on the case:

Washington-based Judicial Watch named Illinois among 11 states that have another kind of discrepancy in their voting rolls: The number of registered voters exceeds the number of voting-age citizens as determined by a review of Census data.

In April, the group sent a notice-of-violation letter along with a threat to sue the 11 states.

Robert Popper, director of Judicial Watch's Election Integrity Project and formerly deputy chief of the voting section of the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department, said that not maintaining accurate voting rolls violates the National Voter Registration Act of 1993.

"People remember the act as the 'motor voter' law because it requires the states to offer voter registration forms with driver license applications," Popper said. "But what a lot of people forget is that as a compromise for getting the act through, it requires states to maintain accurate voting rolls."

Judicial Watch identified 26 Illinois counties where voter registration was higher than the number of people eligible to vote, according to Census numbers.

But we can expect that Democrats will continue to dismiss the possibility that vote fraud worked for them on a significant scale.  The fact that they resist investigation is telling.

Hat tip: Peter von Buol

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