Why is the Secret Service going so easy on agent who proclaimed she wouldn't take a bullet for Trump?

The top management of the Secret Service is going surprisingly easy on a senior agent – one with daily managerial leadership responsibilities – who publicly proclaimed on Facebook last October that she would rather face jail time than take a bullet for Donald Trump, along with other posts opposing him.  Trump Derangement Syndrome among the Praetorians is a mortal threat to the incumbent in the office of commander in chief.

According to Susan Crabtree of The Free Beacon, Kerry O'Grady, the agent in charge of the Secret Service's Denver Office:

... did not suffer several disciplinary actions imposed on other agents and officers for allegations of similarly serious or lesser misconduct, according to multiple sources from the Secret Service community and attorneys specializing in federal law enforcement labor and employment law.

In fact, she continues to receive her salary and move forward toward the rich retirement package that awaits federal employees, allowing them extended vacations with no financial worries so long as they shall live.

If the Secret Service were serious about sending a message that agents may never allow their personal political views to affect their protective efforts on the behalf of their assigned responsibilities, there are serious actions that could have been taken, despite the fact that "Secret Service employees are federal workers with multiple layers of job protections and legal due-process rights."

Sean Bigley, a partner at Bigley Ranish, a firm specializing in security-clearance denials, said the Secret Service regularly places employees accused of wrongdoing on unpaid leave while they investigate the allegations.

"All the clients I have are on unpaid administrative leave," he said. "Then they have to sit around for a year cooling their heels before anything is proven. It's very punitive."

One of his current clients has been on unpaid leave for three years while the Secret Service and the Department of Homeland Security Inspector General have investigated the charges and counter-charges in the case, he said.

"His life has completely imploded," Bigley said of the client, who has lost his home and depleted his life savings as he waits for some type of resolution.

Additionally, the agency has not responded to his requests to seek outside employment, which could be prohibited because employees on unpaid administrative leave are still considered Secret Service employees.

Any attempts to earn income while their case remains in legal limbo could jeopardize their Secret Service employment status, as well as any retirement accrued.

Given the fact that she has executive responsibilities in an agency responsible for protecting President Trump, her statements are an obvious impediment to effective discharge of the agency's mission.  They are also likely violations of the Hatch Act.

In operational security training, agents are warned against the use of social media because it can expose their personal information and their movements, sources say. 

That post triggered at least one complaint to the Secret Service, those sources added. 

O'Grady told the Examiner she took down the post just a couple of days after it was posted.

The demands on the Presidential Protection Detail of the Secret Service currently are at extreme levels, as a stream of propaganda from Hollywood and Democrat politicians uses bloody images and violent rhetoric to suggest that political violence is justified.  Already, one mass assassination attempt against Republican office holders has been experienced, at tremendous human cost.  But the Secret Service is not doing what it could do to punish what amounts to a wink and a nod to lower levels that, should the opportunity arise, it would be better to let the president of the United States die at the hands of an assassin than for them to discharge their sworn duties at the risk of injury.

The top management of the Secret Service is going surprisingly easy on a senior agent – one with daily managerial leadership responsibilities – who publicly proclaimed on Facebook last October that she would rather face jail time than take a bullet for Donald Trump, along with other posts opposing him.  Trump Derangement Syndrome among the Praetorians is a mortal threat to the incumbent in the office of commander in chief.

According to Susan Crabtree of The Free Beacon, Kerry O'Grady, the agent in charge of the Secret Service's Denver Office:

... did not suffer several disciplinary actions imposed on other agents and officers for allegations of similarly serious or lesser misconduct, according to multiple sources from the Secret Service community and attorneys specializing in federal law enforcement labor and employment law.

In fact, she continues to receive her salary and move forward toward the rich retirement package that awaits federal employees, allowing them extended vacations with no financial worries so long as they shall live.

If the Secret Service were serious about sending a message that agents may never allow their personal political views to affect their protective efforts on the behalf of their assigned responsibilities, there are serious actions that could have been taken, despite the fact that "Secret Service employees are federal workers with multiple layers of job protections and legal due-process rights."

Sean Bigley, a partner at Bigley Ranish, a firm specializing in security-clearance denials, said the Secret Service regularly places employees accused of wrongdoing on unpaid leave while they investigate the allegations.

"All the clients I have are on unpaid administrative leave," he said. "Then they have to sit around for a year cooling their heels before anything is proven. It's very punitive."

One of his current clients has been on unpaid leave for three years while the Secret Service and the Department of Homeland Security Inspector General have investigated the charges and counter-charges in the case, he said.

"His life has completely imploded," Bigley said of the client, who has lost his home and depleted his life savings as he waits for some type of resolution.

Additionally, the agency has not responded to his requests to seek outside employment, which could be prohibited because employees on unpaid administrative leave are still considered Secret Service employees.

Any attempts to earn income while their case remains in legal limbo could jeopardize their Secret Service employment status, as well as any retirement accrued.

Given the fact that she has executive responsibilities in an agency responsible for protecting President Trump, her statements are an obvious impediment to effective discharge of the agency's mission.  They are also likely violations of the Hatch Act.

In operational security training, agents are warned against the use of social media because it can expose their personal information and their movements, sources say. 

That post triggered at least one complaint to the Secret Service, those sources added. 

O'Grady told the Examiner she took down the post just a couple of days after it was posted.

The demands on the Presidential Protection Detail of the Secret Service currently are at extreme levels, as a stream of propaganda from Hollywood and Democrat politicians uses bloody images and violent rhetoric to suggest that political violence is justified.  Already, one mass assassination attempt against Republican office holders has been experienced, at tremendous human cost.  But the Secret Service is not doing what it could do to punish what amounts to a wink and a nod to lower levels that, should the opportunity arise, it would be better to let the president of the United States die at the hands of an assassin than for them to discharge their sworn duties at the risk of injury.

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