Jamelle Bouie: Rise in hate crimes due to Trump election

Slate's political correspondent, Jamelle Bouie, is one of the primary liberal instigators of Trump Derangement Syndrome in the media.  A few of his past efforts reveals an anti-Trump hysteria second to none:

President Loser

President Con Artist

The Presidential Advisory Commission on Voter Supression

Cruel Old Party

Bouie has outdone himself with this screed that claims that the rise in hate crimes (only against blacks, Hispanics, and Muslims) is directly related to the election of Donald Trump as president.

Nationally, white supremacist and white nationalist activity is on the rise, from more aggressive recruiting online, to active organizing and intimidation on college campuses. Law enforcement officials in cities such as New York have seen a surge in reported hate crimes, and the Southern Poverty Law Center reports an increase in the number of hate groups. All of this takes place against a backdrop of political intolerance. Donald Trump ran for president on a platform of ethno-nationalism, offering interested white voters a chance to express and vote their resentments against Hispanic immigrants, Muslim Americans, and groups like Black Lives Matter. His campaign brought explicitly racist groups, individuals, and institutions into the mainstream, from Steve Bannon – who rode the success of his hate-fueled site Breitbart to a position as a top adviser in the Trump White House – to formerly fringe figures like Iowa Rep. Steve King, who routinely traffics in white nationalist rhetoric.

Is there an objective, non-partisan reasoned examination of Trump's rhetoric that "proves" he's a "racist" or a "xenophobe"?  What has Trump ever said that brands him as an "ethno-nationalist"?  The beauty of Bouie's thesis is that he doesn't have to prove it.  Everyone "knows" that Trump is a hater, so all manner of evil can be ascribed to his rise.

Even if Bouie were to cite chapter and verse "proving" Trump's racism, I sincerely doubt that his examples would withstand any reasonable test of objectivity.  It's all about "code words" and "dog whistles" and secret codes that only Bouie and white supremacists understand.

Millions of white Americans stomped the floor for Trump's promise to end "political correctness" and restore prosperity through tough action against foreign others, turning out at higher numbers than either 2008 or 2012. This rhetoric has a real impact. A recent working paper suggests that when people view Trump's popularity as going up, it "increases their willingness to publicly express xenophobic views." It's a straightforward idea: High electoral support for a candidate who espouses prejudiced views may shape how individuals perceive the social desirability of those views. In our case, the election of Trump may have weakened norms against the expression of various bigotries, including racism. To all of this, add the return of "scientific racism" to public view and the recent controversies over Confederate memorials and Confederate remembrance, which have galvanized a broad stripe of racial reactionaries.

Contained in this "explanation" are the seeds of truth.  Bouie lumps "millions of white Americans" with the bigots and the racists.  It's a standard racialist view that almost all white Americans are racists, Islamophobes, and haters in general.  Again, Bouie refuses to cite any examples that would validate the theory found in the "working paper" (is the author having difficulty getting it published in a scholarly journal?), and even if he could, it is impossible to prove that hate crimes are committed by more than a handful of disturbed individuals.  Are these perpetrators of hate crimes representative of the entire white race?  Sheesh.

Bouie proceeds to give us a history lesson about what is perhaps the ugliest race riot in U.S. history – Tulsa, Okla., 1921.  Bouie seems to be making the point that nothing much has changed since then – that the same motivations in our culture and politics are at work today.

This is true to a point, but the question is, could the same race riot occur in Tulsa, or any other American city, today?  In fact, a race riot today is far more likely to be directed against whites and other ethnicities by blacks than vice versa.  So the idea that there is an undercurrent of racism against blacks in our culture and our politics might be true, but you can hardly claim that it is at the same level that existed in 1921.  We have made progress.  That racists are crawling out from under their rocks and spewing their garbage is not the fault of Donald Trump.  That mentally disturbed bigots are attacking and killing people while spouting hate cannot be rationally connected to the election of Donald Trump, any more than the flash mobs of black teenagers who beat up white folks and trashed businesses all over the country during the last eight years can be blamed on Barack Obama.

Trump may not be a white supremacist or racist, but he's an old-fashioned, insensitive lout who has proven to be tone-deaf when speaking about minorities.  This doesn't make him a race-hater any more than Barack Obama was an enabler of violence against whites.

That is, unless you're a hysterical partisan hack like Jamelle Bouie.

Slate's political correspondent, Jamelle Bouie, is one of the primary liberal instigators of Trump Derangement Syndrome in the media.  A few of his past efforts reveals an anti-Trump hysteria second to none:

President Loser

President Con Artist

The Presidential Advisory Commission on Voter Supression

Cruel Old Party

Bouie has outdone himself with this screed that claims that the rise in hate crimes (only against blacks, Hispanics, and Muslims) is directly related to the election of Donald Trump as president.

Nationally, white supremacist and white nationalist activity is on the rise, from more aggressive recruiting online, to active organizing and intimidation on college campuses. Law enforcement officials in cities such as New York have seen a surge in reported hate crimes, and the Southern Poverty Law Center reports an increase in the number of hate groups. All of this takes place against a backdrop of political intolerance. Donald Trump ran for president on a platform of ethno-nationalism, offering interested white voters a chance to express and vote their resentments against Hispanic immigrants, Muslim Americans, and groups like Black Lives Matter. His campaign brought explicitly racist groups, individuals, and institutions into the mainstream, from Steve Bannon – who rode the success of his hate-fueled site Breitbart to a position as a top adviser in the Trump White House – to formerly fringe figures like Iowa Rep. Steve King, who routinely traffics in white nationalist rhetoric.

Is there an objective, non-partisan reasoned examination of Trump's rhetoric that "proves" he's a "racist" or a "xenophobe"?  What has Trump ever said that brands him as an "ethno-nationalist"?  The beauty of Bouie's thesis is that he doesn't have to prove it.  Everyone "knows" that Trump is a hater, so all manner of evil can be ascribed to his rise.

Even if Bouie were to cite chapter and verse "proving" Trump's racism, I sincerely doubt that his examples would withstand any reasonable test of objectivity.  It's all about "code words" and "dog whistles" and secret codes that only Bouie and white supremacists understand.

Millions of white Americans stomped the floor for Trump's promise to end "political correctness" and restore prosperity through tough action against foreign others, turning out at higher numbers than either 2008 or 2012. This rhetoric has a real impact. A recent working paper suggests that when people view Trump's popularity as going up, it "increases their willingness to publicly express xenophobic views." It's a straightforward idea: High electoral support for a candidate who espouses prejudiced views may shape how individuals perceive the social desirability of those views. In our case, the election of Trump may have weakened norms against the expression of various bigotries, including racism. To all of this, add the return of "scientific racism" to public view and the recent controversies over Confederate memorials and Confederate remembrance, which have galvanized a broad stripe of racial reactionaries.

Contained in this "explanation" are the seeds of truth.  Bouie lumps "millions of white Americans" with the bigots and the racists.  It's a standard racialist view that almost all white Americans are racists, Islamophobes, and haters in general.  Again, Bouie refuses to cite any examples that would validate the theory found in the "working paper" (is the author having difficulty getting it published in a scholarly journal?), and even if he could, it is impossible to prove that hate crimes are committed by more than a handful of disturbed individuals.  Are these perpetrators of hate crimes representative of the entire white race?  Sheesh.

Bouie proceeds to give us a history lesson about what is perhaps the ugliest race riot in U.S. history – Tulsa, Okla., 1921.  Bouie seems to be making the point that nothing much has changed since then – that the same motivations in our culture and politics are at work today.

This is true to a point, but the question is, could the same race riot occur in Tulsa, or any other American city, today?  In fact, a race riot today is far more likely to be directed against whites and other ethnicities by blacks than vice versa.  So the idea that there is an undercurrent of racism against blacks in our culture and our politics might be true, but you can hardly claim that it is at the same level that existed in 1921.  We have made progress.  That racists are crawling out from under their rocks and spewing their garbage is not the fault of Donald Trump.  That mentally disturbed bigots are attacking and killing people while spouting hate cannot be rationally connected to the election of Donald Trump, any more than the flash mobs of black teenagers who beat up white folks and trashed businesses all over the country during the last eight years can be blamed on Barack Obama.

Trump may not be a white supremacist or racist, but he's an old-fashioned, insensitive lout who has proven to be tone-deaf when speaking about minorities.  This doesn't make him a race-hater any more than Barack Obama was an enabler of violence against whites.

That is, unless you're a hysterical partisan hack like Jamelle Bouie.

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