A lemon for the teacher

"What would you do if your child came home from school with an assignment to write an essay titled 'Why I Am Ashamed to Be White'?" Shocking issues like this during the 1990s, as the culture war switched from cold to hot, made me and other writers drop what we were doing to sound alarms.

Racism against whites is denied now by the left – considered impossible, in fact – but the ongoing war on "whitey" tells a different story.  Race discrimination by teachers was yet another reason – besides the downward shift in quality of public school education – for parents to homeschool their children and for culture defenders to call for action against seditious teaching practices.  Mortifying and running down school children because of their color had no place then and has no place now or ever in our society.

Who, except anyone with a warped moral sense and a fogged up view of justice, doesn't see that there is no racial basis for shame or pride?  Assigning merit or demerit on the basis of race is a display of the very racism one may be fighting.  Lumping people into political groups according to skin color – using race to invent factions – firing up the spirit of revenge – are parts of a high-stakes political game to gain power, a dishonest and ruthless game in which all groups lose.

Assigning guilt and exacting retribution for wrongdoing – the job in a civilized society of jurists and justices committed to truth – requires evidence, not prejudice, to carry out.  Anyone who does not understand this introduction to Justice 101 has no business teaching.  Parents of every race expect their children to be treated with equal fairness and respect by their teachers.  Anyone who sorts students out by race and declares one racial group "less worthy" than the others is unfit to be a teacher.

Warping the minds of children and filling their hearts with hatred and revenge have no place in school or anywhere else on our planet.

Anthony J. DeBlasi is a Korean War veteran and lifelong defender of Western culture.  

"What would you do if your child came home from school with an assignment to write an essay titled 'Why I Am Ashamed to Be White'?" Shocking issues like this during the 1990s, as the culture war switched from cold to hot, made me and other writers drop what we were doing to sound alarms.

Racism against whites is denied now by the left – considered impossible, in fact – but the ongoing war on "whitey" tells a different story.  Race discrimination by teachers was yet another reason – besides the downward shift in quality of public school education – for parents to homeschool their children and for culture defenders to call for action against seditious teaching practices.  Mortifying and running down school children because of their color had no place then and has no place now or ever in our society.

Who, except anyone with a warped moral sense and a fogged up view of justice, doesn't see that there is no racial basis for shame or pride?  Assigning merit or demerit on the basis of race is a display of the very racism one may be fighting.  Lumping people into political groups according to skin color – using race to invent factions – firing up the spirit of revenge – are parts of a high-stakes political game to gain power, a dishonest and ruthless game in which all groups lose.

Assigning guilt and exacting retribution for wrongdoing – the job in a civilized society of jurists and justices committed to truth – requires evidence, not prejudice, to carry out.  Anyone who does not understand this introduction to Justice 101 has no business teaching.  Parents of every race expect their children to be treated with equal fairness and respect by their teachers.  Anyone who sorts students out by race and declares one racial group "less worthy" than the others is unfit to be a teacher.

Warping the minds of children and filling their hearts with hatred and revenge have no place in school or anywhere else on our planet.

Anthony J. DeBlasi is a Korean War veteran and lifelong defender of Western culture.  

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