New first-person shooter has players hunting white Americans

Computer games are not immune to the trend of political correctness in films and television shows.  Radical Islamist villains in recent computer games are about as common as they are in movie theaters, which is to say not at all.

Perhaps the most striking example of this is Ubisoft's popular "Far Cry" series, comprising "open world" computer games that let you roam luscious jungles, forests, and mountains in search of your prey.  The hallmark of the game is allowing players to tackle problems creatively.  If you have to attack an outpost, you can climb into the hills above and shoot the enemy with a bow and arrow.  Or you can infiltrate by swimming in a stream and use a hunting knife or a silenced pistol at close range.  Or you can plant high explosives around the fortress and then lure the enemy out of his hideout.

But while gorgeously programmed, the game's choice of enemies is a little odd.

In Far Cry 1, the enemies were mutants.  In Far Cry 2, the enemy was an arms dealer.  In Far Cry 3, the enemies were mean Polynesian islanders.  Yes, mean Polynesian Islanders.  In Far Cry 4, the enemy was evil Tibetans.  Those evil Tibetans!

See a pattern here?

Now information is coming out about Far Cry 5.  The enemy this time is apparently...evil racist  redneck white Americans.  Note the church in the photo below and the prisoner with the word "sinner" on his back?  It looks as if these are supposedly evil right-wing extremist Christians.

For the most part, extremist Christians are about as common as evil Tibetans and evil Polynesian islanders, which is to say almost nonexistent.  It's one thing for Ubisoft to consciously avoid  featuring the most obvious villains, the ones we've been at war with for 16 years.  But then to ignore the obvious villains and target white people and Christians is really a bizarro-mirror-mirror opposite universe.

Once again, the media teach us that Americans are bad.  It's just unusual to find this level of indoctrination in computer games.

Exit question: For those of you who play or have played computer games, what examples of P.C. have you found in them?

Ed Straker is the senior writer at NewsMachete.com.

Computer games are not immune to the trend of political correctness in films and television shows.  Radical Islamist villains in recent computer games are about as common as they are in movie theaters, which is to say not at all.

Perhaps the most striking example of this is Ubisoft's popular "Far Cry" series, comprising "open world" computer games that let you roam luscious jungles, forests, and mountains in search of your prey.  The hallmark of the game is allowing players to tackle problems creatively.  If you have to attack an outpost, you can climb into the hills above and shoot the enemy with a bow and arrow.  Or you can infiltrate by swimming in a stream and use a hunting knife or a silenced pistol at close range.  Or you can plant high explosives around the fortress and then lure the enemy out of his hideout.

But while gorgeously programmed, the game's choice of enemies is a little odd.

In Far Cry 1, the enemies were mutants.  In Far Cry 2, the enemy was an arms dealer.  In Far Cry 3, the enemies were mean Polynesian islanders.  Yes, mean Polynesian Islanders.  In Far Cry 4, the enemy was evil Tibetans.  Those evil Tibetans!

See a pattern here?

Now information is coming out about Far Cry 5.  The enemy this time is apparently...evil racist  redneck white Americans.  Note the church in the photo below and the prisoner with the word "sinner" on his back?  It looks as if these are supposedly evil right-wing extremist Christians.

For the most part, extremist Christians are about as common as evil Tibetans and evil Polynesian islanders, which is to say almost nonexistent.  It's one thing for Ubisoft to consciously avoid  featuring the most obvious villains, the ones we've been at war with for 16 years.  But then to ignore the obvious villains and target white people and Christians is really a bizarro-mirror-mirror opposite universe.

Once again, the media teach us that Americans are bad.  It's just unusual to find this level of indoctrination in computer games.

Exit question: For those of you who play or have played computer games, what examples of P.C. have you found in them?

Ed Straker is the senior writer at NewsMachete.com.

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