Judge throws out clock boy 'discrimination' lawsuit

A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit against the city of Irving, Texas and the local school district that alleged discrimination against Ahmed Mohamed, the student who brought a "clock" to school that looked suspiciously like a bomb.

Mohamed was arrested and charged with bringing a hoax bomb to school.  Those charges were later dropped, but the resulting furor from the incident became a litmus test for "Islamophobia" in America.  Those who supported the "innocent" teen were tolerant, broad-minded, and welcoming of diversity.  Those who think the student wrong were haters.  Ahmed ended up being invited to NASA headquarters and an event that featured President Obama as the left rallied to his cause.

Meanwhile, his father moved the family to Qatar but stayed only nine months.  When the family moved back to Irving, they demanded $15 million not to pursue legal action.  The town and school district refused to pay the extortion, which resulted in the lawsuit thrown out yesterday.

Daily Mail:

Court papers obtained by DailyMail.com reveal on May 18, a judge dismissed the entire case. The lawsuit sought unspecified compensatory and punitive damages along with attorney fees.  

The judge wrote: 'Plaintiff does not allege any facts from which this court can reasonably infer that any IISD employee intentionally discriminated against Ahmed Mohamed based on his race or religion.' 

Further, he notes that the suit failed to identify any policy, custom, or practice of the City that was allegedly the moving force behind any violation of Ahmed's Fifth Amendment rights.

When the lawsuit was first filed in 2016, the district hit back at the Mohamed family's allegations saying Ahmed deliberately disobeyed his teacher by activating the clock despite her warning.

The judge said the  failed to allege any facts from which the court could reasonably conclude that Ahmed was discriminated against based on his race or religion.

The ruling said the suit had: 'Absent allegations of intentional discrimination, or allegations from which the court can reasonably infer intentional discrimination, Plaintiff fails to allege an equal protection violation against the IISD.' 

Mohamed's complaint also said Irving Independent School District has an 'ugly history of race struggles,' and the State of Texas and the IISD have a 'history of discrimination against Muslims in Texas curriculum and schools.'

Prior to filing the most recent lawsuit, the family demanded $15 million dollars in damages in the months after the arrest.

Damages are only granted for intentional discrimination. Mohamed is allowed to file an amended complaint by June 1.  

The lawsuits and extortion demand are pretty strong indications – if not proof – that the entire incident was a scheme concocted – probably by the father – to soak the city and school district for as much money as they could get. Obviously, the family was expecting a quick settlement.  But Irving fought back and has now been vindicated.

The family say they will refile the lawsuit, and the judge has given them until June 1 to do so.  But the judge's reasoning in throwing out the suit in the first place – that Mohamed failed the most basic legal test in a discrimination lawsuit – means that a similar result will ensue following the refiling of the lawsuit.

A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit against the city of Irving, Texas and the local school district that alleged discrimination against Ahmed Mohamed, the student who brought a "clock" to school that looked suspiciously like a bomb.

Mohamed was arrested and charged with bringing a hoax bomb to school.  Those charges were later dropped, but the resulting furor from the incident became a litmus test for "Islamophobia" in America.  Those who supported the "innocent" teen were tolerant, broad-minded, and welcoming of diversity.  Those who think the student wrong were haters.  Ahmed ended up being invited to NASA headquarters and an event that featured President Obama as the left rallied to his cause.

Meanwhile, his father moved the family to Qatar but stayed only nine months.  When the family moved back to Irving, they demanded $15 million not to pursue legal action.  The town and school district refused to pay the extortion, which resulted in the lawsuit thrown out yesterday.

Daily Mail:

Court papers obtained by DailyMail.com reveal on May 18, a judge dismissed the entire case. The lawsuit sought unspecified compensatory and punitive damages along with attorney fees.  

The judge wrote: 'Plaintiff does not allege any facts from which this court can reasonably infer that any IISD employee intentionally discriminated against Ahmed Mohamed based on his race or religion.' 

Further, he notes that the suit failed to identify any policy, custom, or practice of the City that was allegedly the moving force behind any violation of Ahmed's Fifth Amendment rights.

When the lawsuit was first filed in 2016, the district hit back at the Mohamed family's allegations saying Ahmed deliberately disobeyed his teacher by activating the clock despite her warning.

The judge said the  failed to allege any facts from which the court could reasonably conclude that Ahmed was discriminated against based on his race or religion.

The ruling said the suit had: 'Absent allegations of intentional discrimination, or allegations from which the court can reasonably infer intentional discrimination, Plaintiff fails to allege an equal protection violation against the IISD.' 

Mohamed's complaint also said Irving Independent School District has an 'ugly history of race struggles,' and the State of Texas and the IISD have a 'history of discrimination against Muslims in Texas curriculum and schools.'

Prior to filing the most recent lawsuit, the family demanded $15 million dollars in damages in the months after the arrest.

Damages are only granted for intentional discrimination. Mohamed is allowed to file an amended complaint by June 1.  

The lawsuits and extortion demand are pretty strong indications – if not proof – that the entire incident was a scheme concocted – probably by the father – to soak the city and school district for as much money as they could get. Obviously, the family was expecting a quick settlement.  But Irving fought back and has now been vindicated.

The family say they will refile the lawsuit, and the judge has given them until June 1 to do so.  But the judge's reasoning in throwing out the suit in the first place – that Mohamed failed the most basic legal test in a discrimination lawsuit – means that a similar result will ensue following the refiling of the lawsuit.

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