After Wellesley, yes, Hillary's still running

Hillary Clinton waded back into the celebrity college commencement speaker trough, undoubtedly with big speaking fees, giving her first public speech outlining her tax-and-spend agenda at her old alma mater, Wellesley College.

Her operatives also played down reports from it that she had long cough attacks during the delivery, which may be signs of serious medical issues.  They casually dismissed it as allergies.  Of such unnecessary protestations, "at this point, what difference does it make?"

This brings us to the real point here: Hillary is running for president again.

One has to ask what the motivation for this might be, given that she is in poor health, in her mid-70s, has seen her pay-to-play foundation fundraising cash cow collapse, and undoubtedly is mentally exhausted from the last run just six months ago.

American Thinker editor emeritus Richard Baehr has observed:

I think she looks at rest of democratic field and President Trump's approval numbers and is considering one more try for president.  What else can keep her relevant?

He's right.  She sees her opportunity, and she's going to take it.  That would explain the public speaking engagements (paid, of course) and the hard-to-believe denials of chronic medical problems.

So what does the field look like, and who else is out there?  Will Andrew Cuomo take her place as the next Democratic Party favorite?  He's making noises for it.  Possible, but not entirely a threat, given Clinton's vastly greater name recognition and popularity among her supporters.  Bernie Sanders?  Maybe, but he's got a ceiling on his support due to his socialist orientation.  There's Chuckie Schumer, the Castro brothers, Corey Booker from New Jersey, Massachusetts Democrat governor Deval Patrick, maybe Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez.  Yet none can hold a candle to her own standard as party standard bearer or presidential candidate.

There's one name that might be such a threat, however: Elizabeth Warren, whose name recognition is comparable to Hillary's own and who also has a fanatic base of followers.

She's also not known to be on good terms with Hillary Clinton or the Clinton machine, despite occasional limp endorsements.  In fact, it's believed that the two women hate each other.  Hillary can never see Warren as a friend or coeval – she's an unwelcome rival.

And if so, there are plenty of reasons why, to look at the psychology of the matter.

Hillary married her way to power and is highly reliant on her husband, the oozing charm natural politician Bill Clinton for political advice and direction.  She knows this.  Elizabeth Warren, on the other hand, is entirely self-made.  And Clinton knows this, too.  This one fact alone has to rankle her the most.

House-flipper, fake Indian, affirmative action fraudster Elizabeth Warren bit and clawed her way to the top in ways only someone from a hardscrabble lower-middle-class background with immense ambition could do.  Hillary has always had her "achievements" handed to her by someone else.  Yes, it has to rankle.

Warren also has a track record of sorts, making a name for herself with the establishment of the Consumer Protection Financial Bureau, supposedly to use as a hammer against corporate interests, which are so part of her political platform.  She's a tenured Harvard professor, too, which has to rankle Clinton further, given her own middle-class roots.  Hillary, by contrast, has no achievements to point to, either as a senator or as a former secretary of state.  In fact, her record is one of continuous failure – not merely left-wing policy, but failed leftwing policy.  It has to rankle.

Warren is also a fresher face, and it might mean something that she's thinner than the chronically corpulent Clinton.  Personal jealousy?  I vote yes.

In light of all those variables, is it any surprise that Hillary might just be thinking of running?  She's not going to let the "first female president" title go to a hated rival like Warren.  No, with her Wellesley speech and other calculated appearances, Clinton's going to continue pursuing the crown she thinks is rightfully hers.  Especially since she sees that Warren might get it.

Hillary Clinton waded back into the celebrity college commencement speaker trough, undoubtedly with big speaking fees, giving her first public speech outlining her tax-and-spend agenda at her old alma mater, Wellesley College.

Her operatives also played down reports from it that she had long cough attacks during the delivery, which may be signs of serious medical issues.  They casually dismissed it as allergies.  Of such unnecessary protestations, "at this point, what difference does it make?"

This brings us to the real point here: Hillary is running for president again.

One has to ask what the motivation for this might be, given that she is in poor health, in her mid-70s, has seen her pay-to-play foundation fundraising cash cow collapse, and undoubtedly is mentally exhausted from the last run just six months ago.

American Thinker editor emeritus Richard Baehr has observed:

I think she looks at rest of democratic field and President Trump's approval numbers and is considering one more try for president.  What else can keep her relevant?

He's right.  She sees her opportunity, and she's going to take it.  That would explain the public speaking engagements (paid, of course) and the hard-to-believe denials of chronic medical problems.

So what does the field look like, and who else is out there?  Will Andrew Cuomo take her place as the next Democratic Party favorite?  He's making noises for it.  Possible, but not entirely a threat, given Clinton's vastly greater name recognition and popularity among her supporters.  Bernie Sanders?  Maybe, but he's got a ceiling on his support due to his socialist orientation.  There's Chuckie Schumer, the Castro brothers, Corey Booker from New Jersey, Massachusetts Democrat governor Deval Patrick, maybe Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez.  Yet none can hold a candle to her own standard as party standard bearer or presidential candidate.

There's one name that might be such a threat, however: Elizabeth Warren, whose name recognition is comparable to Hillary's own and who also has a fanatic base of followers.

She's also not known to be on good terms with Hillary Clinton or the Clinton machine, despite occasional limp endorsements.  In fact, it's believed that the two women hate each other.  Hillary can never see Warren as a friend or coeval – she's an unwelcome rival.

And if so, there are plenty of reasons why, to look at the psychology of the matter.

Hillary married her way to power and is highly reliant on her husband, the oozing charm natural politician Bill Clinton for political advice and direction.  She knows this.  Elizabeth Warren, on the other hand, is entirely self-made.  And Clinton knows this, too.  This one fact alone has to rankle her the most.

House-flipper, fake Indian, affirmative action fraudster Elizabeth Warren bit and clawed her way to the top in ways only someone from a hardscrabble lower-middle-class background with immense ambition could do.  Hillary has always had her "achievements" handed to her by someone else.  Yes, it has to rankle.

Warren also has a track record of sorts, making a name for herself with the establishment of the Consumer Protection Financial Bureau, supposedly to use as a hammer against corporate interests, which are so part of her political platform.  She's a tenured Harvard professor, too, which has to rankle Clinton further, given her own middle-class roots.  Hillary, by contrast, has no achievements to point to, either as a senator or as a former secretary of state.  In fact, her record is one of continuous failure – not merely left-wing policy, but failed leftwing policy.  It has to rankle.

Warren is also a fresher face, and it might mean something that she's thinner than the chronically corpulent Clinton.  Personal jealousy?  I vote yes.

In light of all those variables, is it any surprise that Hillary might just be thinking of running?  She's not going to let the "first female president" title go to a hated rival like Warren.  No, with her Wellesley speech and other calculated appearances, Clinton's going to continue pursuing the crown she thinks is rightfully hers.  Especially since she sees that Warren might get it.

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