US cuts off funding for UN agency that promotes coercive abortions

The U.S. State Department informed U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Bob Corker that the United States is cutting off funding for the United Nations Population Fund, an international program that promotes abortion and sterilizations.

In January, the Trump administration announced a return to the "Mexico City policy" of not funding international aid programs that encourage women to get abortions. 

Reuters:

Known by critics as the "global gag" rule, Trump broadened its scope to include all global health assistance in his Jan. 23 executive order that withholds at least half a billion dollars in U.S. funds. A lack of clarity around the rule, however, has left aid groups scrambling and both Republican and Democratic U.S. lawmakers seeking clarity.

In a statement on its website, UNFPA said it regrets the U.S. decision to end funding, which it said is based on an "erroneous claim" that the agency supports coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization in China.

UNFPA said its mission is "to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth is safe and every young person’s potential is fulfilled."

"The support we received over the years from the government and people of the United States has saved tens of thousands of mothers from preventable deaths and disabilities, and especially now in the rapidly developing global humanitarian crises," the statement said.

The cut follows Trump's proposed 28 percent budget reduction for diplomacy and foreign aid, including an unspecified reduction in financial support for the United Nations and its agencies, announced last month.

U.N. agencies such as the UNFPA are funded by governments voluntarily. The United States was the fourth-largest voluntary donor to UNFPA in 2015, giving $75 million in core budget and earmarked contributions. 

U.N. officials have warned that abrupt funding cuts could trigger more global instability and argued that dollars for diplomacy are more effective than military spending in combating terrorism.

Leaving aside the sophistry of that last statement, the idea of associating abortion with "family planning" or "population control" is morally repugnant.  It's also a racist policy.  It presupposes that babies of color in the Third World are less valuable than babies born in the West.

Forced sterilizations are almost as problematic.  Population control advocates are foisting these policies on poor people, violating their individual rights and oftentimes the values and traditions they hold dear. 

All the warnings from the 1970s about Earth being unable to sustain the population we have today were proved spectacularly wrong.  The "Green Revolution" has allowed the planet to support a population that the naysayers like overpopulation guru Paul Ehrlich said would be impossible.

U.N. ambassador Haley says other U.N. agencies on the block include human rights and peacekeeping programs.  Both agencies have long been eyed by U.N. opponents as examples of U.N. overreach and hypocrisy.  Advocates say the cuts will weaken the U.N.

Yes.  And their point is...?

The U.S. State Department informed U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Bob Corker that the United States is cutting off funding for the United Nations Population Fund, an international program that promotes abortion and sterilizations.

In January, the Trump administration announced a return to the "Mexico City policy" of not funding international aid programs that encourage women to get abortions. 

Reuters:

Known by critics as the "global gag" rule, Trump broadened its scope to include all global health assistance in his Jan. 23 executive order that withholds at least half a billion dollars in U.S. funds. A lack of clarity around the rule, however, has left aid groups scrambling and both Republican and Democratic U.S. lawmakers seeking clarity.

In a statement on its website, UNFPA said it regrets the U.S. decision to end funding, which it said is based on an "erroneous claim" that the agency supports coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization in China.

UNFPA said its mission is "to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth is safe and every young person’s potential is fulfilled."

"The support we received over the years from the government and people of the United States has saved tens of thousands of mothers from preventable deaths and disabilities, and especially now in the rapidly developing global humanitarian crises," the statement said.

The cut follows Trump's proposed 28 percent budget reduction for diplomacy and foreign aid, including an unspecified reduction in financial support for the United Nations and its agencies, announced last month.

U.N. agencies such as the UNFPA are funded by governments voluntarily. The United States was the fourth-largest voluntary donor to UNFPA in 2015, giving $75 million in core budget and earmarked contributions. 

U.N. officials have warned that abrupt funding cuts could trigger more global instability and argued that dollars for diplomacy are more effective than military spending in combating terrorism.

Leaving aside the sophistry of that last statement, the idea of associating abortion with "family planning" or "population control" is morally repugnant.  It's also a racist policy.  It presupposes that babies of color in the Third World are less valuable than babies born in the West.

Forced sterilizations are almost as problematic.  Population control advocates are foisting these policies on poor people, violating their individual rights and oftentimes the values and traditions they hold dear. 

All the warnings from the 1970s about Earth being unable to sustain the population we have today were proved spectacularly wrong.  The "Green Revolution" has allowed the planet to support a population that the naysayers like overpopulation guru Paul Ehrlich said would be impossible.

U.N. ambassador Haley says other U.N. agencies on the block include human rights and peacekeeping programs.  Both agencies have long been eyed by U.N. opponents as examples of U.N. overreach and hypocrisy.  Advocates say the cuts will weaken the U.N.

Yes.  And their point is...?

RECENT VIDEOS