Trump attacks media narrative on Kansas special election

Just how close was the Kansas special congressional election won by GOP candidate Bob Estes?

If you read the media the following day, you might have thought Estes's 8-point victory was "razor close," or it "threw a scare" into Republicans.

President Trump pushed back against that notion with a series of tweets.

Politico:

President Donald Trump on Sunday night accused news organizations of downplaying the special congressional election in Kansas after the Republican candidate won – and suggested the same will happen in the upcoming Georgia special election.

"The recent Kansas election [Congress] was a really big media event, until the Republicans won," he tweeted. "Now they play the same game with Georgia-BAD!"

Interest was high in the recent race in Kansas and the upcoming one in Georgia because they represented unexpectedly close battles for House seats long and easily held by Republicans.

In last week's race, Democrat James Thompson lost to Republican Kansas Treasurer Ron Estes by about 7 percentage points in the heavily Republican Fourth District. They were vying to replace Mike Pompeo, Trump's CIA director.

Pompeo and Trump had both won the district easily in November.

For the record, Estes's 8-point victory in the district exceeded the GOP win margin of Governor Brownback in 2016.  Nobody was talking about Republicans being in trouble at that time.

The facts – as any high school student interested in politics could tell you – contradict the Democrat and media narrative of the special election.  Democrats have whipped up their supporters into a frenzy of hate against Donald Trump, making them far more likely to vote in an off-year contest.  In fact, an argument could be made that the Democrat candidate, James Thompson, actually underperformed, given the turnout of about 25% and the lackluster campaign run by Estes.

Democrats are salivating at the prospect of winning the Georgia special election to fill the seat vacated by HHS secretary Tom Price.  But the illusion here is perhaps even more pronounced.  There is only one serious Democrat candidate, Tom Ossoff, running against a dozen Republicans.  If no candidate receives 50% of the vote, a runoff will be held in May.

Ossoff has raised an astonishing $8 million, mostly from outside the state.  And yet he stands at only 39% in the polls.  If the Republican candidate in the lead, Karen Handel, can unite the party, Ossoff will be swamped in the runoff election.

For a media narrative to be effective, it must contain a germ of truth.  In both special elections, it appears that Democrats are failing to meet that standard.

Just how close was the Kansas special congressional election won by GOP candidate Bob Estes?

If you read the media the following day, you might have thought Estes's 8-point victory was "razor close," or it "threw a scare" into Republicans.

President Trump pushed back against that notion with a series of tweets.

Politico:

President Donald Trump on Sunday night accused news organizations of downplaying the special congressional election in Kansas after the Republican candidate won – and suggested the same will happen in the upcoming Georgia special election.

"The recent Kansas election [Congress] was a really big media event, until the Republicans won," he tweeted. "Now they play the same game with Georgia-BAD!"

Interest was high in the recent race in Kansas and the upcoming one in Georgia because they represented unexpectedly close battles for House seats long and easily held by Republicans.

In last week's race, Democrat James Thompson lost to Republican Kansas Treasurer Ron Estes by about 7 percentage points in the heavily Republican Fourth District. They were vying to replace Mike Pompeo, Trump's CIA director.

Pompeo and Trump had both won the district easily in November.

For the record, Estes's 8-point victory in the district exceeded the GOP win margin of Governor Brownback in 2016.  Nobody was talking about Republicans being in trouble at that time.

The facts – as any high school student interested in politics could tell you – contradict the Democrat and media narrative of the special election.  Democrats have whipped up their supporters into a frenzy of hate against Donald Trump, making them far more likely to vote in an off-year contest.  In fact, an argument could be made that the Democrat candidate, James Thompson, actually underperformed, given the turnout of about 25% and the lackluster campaign run by Estes.

Democrats are salivating at the prospect of winning the Georgia special election to fill the seat vacated by HHS secretary Tom Price.  But the illusion here is perhaps even more pronounced.  There is only one serious Democrat candidate, Tom Ossoff, running against a dozen Republicans.  If no candidate receives 50% of the vote, a runoff will be held in May.

Ossoff has raised an astonishing $8 million, mostly from outside the state.  And yet he stands at only 39% in the polls.  If the Republican candidate in the lead, Karen Handel, can unite the party, Ossoff will be swamped in the runoff election.

For a media narrative to be effective, it must contain a germ of truth.  In both special elections, it appears that Democrats are failing to meet that standard.

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