Convicted terrorist receives standing ovation at Chicago Palestinian conference

Rasmea Odeh, a terrorist convicted and sentenced to ten years in prison for murdering two Hebrew University students in 1970, received a standing ovation at a Palestinian conference in Chicago that was sponsored by a radical leftist Jewish group.

Odeh is being deported from the U.S. for failing to disclose her criminal conviction when she entered the U.S. in the 1990s.  She was set to be retried after a judge threw out her original conviction but agreed to leave the country rather than go to prison.

If Odeh's name sounds familiar, it should.  She was one of the main organizers of the "Day Without A Woman" strike that took place last month.

As a counterpoint to her appearance, a memorial event was held in the same hotel at which she was speaking for the two Jewish students she helped murder.

Washington Times:

"We need you to continue resisting Trump's agenda and to continue challenging the Zionists and to continue providing your solidarity and support to the Palestinian and Arab national movement," said Odeh, a featured speaker at the leftist Jewish Voice for Peace conference at the Hyatt Regency.

Not far away at the same hotel complex, the mood was far more subdued as mourners remembered the two Hebrew University students killed in the 1969 bombing in Tel Aviv, which earned Odeh a decade in an Israeli prison before she was released in a prisoner exchange.

She entered the U.S. more than 20 years ago after giving false answers on her visa application, saying she had not been detained by police, charged with crimes, or incarcerated.

Odeh, 69, agreed last month to leave the country in exchange for no jail time.

"As we learn that the killer will soon be deported from our country, we feel justice has been served, even if just partially," said Assaf Grumberg, Midwest associate director of Stand With Us. "She tried to deceive everyone, hoping her lies would save her. She tried to erase the memory of her victims while hoping she would become a victim herself. She failed."

Stand With Us was rebuffed earlier this month in its attempt to hold a memorial at the same hotel as the JVP national members' meeting. The pro-Israel group responded by reserving a hotel suite and holding the ceremony anyway.

The remembrance included remarks from rabbis and evangelical pastors, as well as statements from the families of Edward Joffe and Leon Kanter, the students killed in the supermarket bombing.

"Who knows what Edward and Leon would have been, who knows what gifts they and their children could have given to the world?" said Peggy Shapiro, Stand With Us Midwest director, in prepared remarks. "They were robbed of their lives and futures by a killer who is speaking at this very venue."

There was no mention of the deadly bombing during Odeh's speech, which came as part of the final plenary session at the three-day conference.

Instead, the applause was thunderous as the 69-year-old Odeh took to the podium after a glowing introduction by Rabbi Alissa Wise, a JVP deputy director.

The rabbi's introduction of Odeh included this gem:

"Rasmea will be leaving us within a few months, but we know that in a short period of time she'll have another Arab women's committee going somewhere, and her legacy of principled resistance to Israeli-U.S. crimes against Palestinians and all other oppressed communities will be honored and continue," said Ms. Wise.

The war against Islamic extremism has two fronts: the war against ISIS, AQ, and all the odious groups who have chosen to murder innocents in the name of Islam and the war at home against those who support the terrorists and resist efforts to combat them.

As we see here, those who fall into the latter group are not necessarily Arabs or Muslims.  And while Western supporters of terrorism are nowhere near a majority, they speak with an outsized voice, magnified by if not sympathy, then certainly "understanding" by the media. 

It's an open question whether Western nations so divided can survive. 

Rasmea Odeh, a terrorist convicted and sentenced to ten years in prison for murdering two Hebrew University students in 1970, received a standing ovation at a Palestinian conference in Chicago that was sponsored by a radical leftist Jewish group.

Odeh is being deported from the U.S. for failing to disclose her criminal conviction when she entered the U.S. in the 1990s.  She was set to be retried after a judge threw out her original conviction but agreed to leave the country rather than go to prison.

If Odeh's name sounds familiar, it should.  She was one of the main organizers of the "Day Without A Woman" strike that took place last month.

As a counterpoint to her appearance, a memorial event was held in the same hotel at which she was speaking for the two Jewish students she helped murder.

Washington Times:

"We need you to continue resisting Trump's agenda and to continue challenging the Zionists and to continue providing your solidarity and support to the Palestinian and Arab national movement," said Odeh, a featured speaker at the leftist Jewish Voice for Peace conference at the Hyatt Regency.

Not far away at the same hotel complex, the mood was far more subdued as mourners remembered the two Hebrew University students killed in the 1969 bombing in Tel Aviv, which earned Odeh a decade in an Israeli prison before she was released in a prisoner exchange.

She entered the U.S. more than 20 years ago after giving false answers on her visa application, saying she had not been detained by police, charged with crimes, or incarcerated.

Odeh, 69, agreed last month to leave the country in exchange for no jail time.

"As we learn that the killer will soon be deported from our country, we feel justice has been served, even if just partially," said Assaf Grumberg, Midwest associate director of Stand With Us. "She tried to deceive everyone, hoping her lies would save her. She tried to erase the memory of her victims while hoping she would become a victim herself. She failed."

Stand With Us was rebuffed earlier this month in its attempt to hold a memorial at the same hotel as the JVP national members' meeting. The pro-Israel group responded by reserving a hotel suite and holding the ceremony anyway.

The remembrance included remarks from rabbis and evangelical pastors, as well as statements from the families of Edward Joffe and Leon Kanter, the students killed in the supermarket bombing.

"Who knows what Edward and Leon would have been, who knows what gifts they and their children could have given to the world?" said Peggy Shapiro, Stand With Us Midwest director, in prepared remarks. "They were robbed of their lives and futures by a killer who is speaking at this very venue."

There was no mention of the deadly bombing during Odeh's speech, which came as part of the final plenary session at the three-day conference.

Instead, the applause was thunderous as the 69-year-old Odeh took to the podium after a glowing introduction by Rabbi Alissa Wise, a JVP deputy director.

The rabbi's introduction of Odeh included this gem:

"Rasmea will be leaving us within a few months, but we know that in a short period of time she'll have another Arab women's committee going somewhere, and her legacy of principled resistance to Israeli-U.S. crimes against Palestinians and all other oppressed communities will be honored and continue," said Ms. Wise.

The war against Islamic extremism has two fronts: the war against ISIS, AQ, and all the odious groups who have chosen to murder innocents in the name of Islam and the war at home against those who support the terrorists and resist efforts to combat them.

As we see here, those who fall into the latter group are not necessarily Arabs or Muslims.  And while Western supporters of terrorism are nowhere near a majority, they speak with an outsized voice, magnified by if not sympathy, then certainly "understanding" by the media. 

It's an open question whether Western nations so divided can survive. 

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