Venezuelan regime feels the iron-tipped boot of Trump

Twitter was ablaze this morning with screechings from Venezuela's Chavista regime, infuriated at the show of force against their brutal, discredited regime coming from President Trump.

Taking an in-your-face approach just three weeks into his presidency, President Trump met with Liliana Tintori, the wife of imprisoned dissident leader Leopoldo Lopez, who was thrown into a dank Chavista dungeon without trial on absolutely phony charges of starting a riot a few years ago.

What a hell of a change from the mealy-mouthed, don't-upset-them approach seen from the Obama and, to some extent, even George Bush White Houses.  Trump not only met with Tintori, signaling that she was welcome in the White House any time she liked, but also posed for a photo with her that included Vice President Mike Pence and Florida senator Marco Rubio, to show an unambiguous united front.  That unsmiling photo, with a fierce-looking portrait of Andrew Jackson probably quite intentionally in the background, warned the thuggish Caracas regime that the soft hand and benign indifference from the states over the last two decades is over.  Meet the iron-tipped boot.

It comes just a few days after Trump placed Chavista Vice President Tareck el-Aissami onto a Treasury Department list of actual drug dealers, something that is not done lightly and requires the most unassailable standards of proof.  The U.S. has had it for years, sitting on it, but until now had refused to execute the sanctions order.  Trump got that job done, too.

Meanwhile, if the Chavista regime wants to talk about it, it can give Secretary of State Rex Tillerson a call.  That would be the same Tilllerson they tried to do a number on back in 2007 or so, expropriating his company's assets when he was chief executive of ExxonMobil and found, much to their surprise, that he fought back.  His actions to recover ExxonMobil's stolen assets drove Citgo into a forced bankruptcy as its Venezuelan state owners tried to defend it from a court-ordered compensation.  He's not called T-Rex for nothing.

No wonder the Chavistas are making a stink on Twitter.  There's a new sheriff in town, and he's got no time for their thievery and thuggery.

Twitter was ablaze this morning with screechings from Venezuela's Chavista regime, infuriated at the show of force against their brutal, discredited regime coming from President Trump.

Taking an in-your-face approach just three weeks into his presidency, President Trump met with Liliana Tintori, the wife of imprisoned dissident leader Leopoldo Lopez, who was thrown into a dank Chavista dungeon without trial on absolutely phony charges of starting a riot a few years ago.

What a hell of a change from the mealy-mouthed, don't-upset-them approach seen from the Obama and, to some extent, even George Bush White Houses.  Trump not only met with Tintori, signaling that she was welcome in the White House any time she liked, but also posed for a photo with her that included Vice President Mike Pence and Florida senator Marco Rubio, to show an unambiguous united front.  That unsmiling photo, with a fierce-looking portrait of Andrew Jackson probably quite intentionally in the background, warned the thuggish Caracas regime that the soft hand and benign indifference from the states over the last two decades is over.  Meet the iron-tipped boot.

It comes just a few days after Trump placed Chavista Vice President Tareck el-Aissami onto a Treasury Department list of actual drug dealers, something that is not done lightly and requires the most unassailable standards of proof.  The U.S. has had it for years, sitting on it, but until now had refused to execute the sanctions order.  Trump got that job done, too.

Meanwhile, if the Chavista regime wants to talk about it, it can give Secretary of State Rex Tillerson a call.  That would be the same Tilllerson they tried to do a number on back in 2007 or so, expropriating his company's assets when he was chief executive of ExxonMobil and found, much to their surprise, that he fought back.  His actions to recover ExxonMobil's stolen assets drove Citgo into a forced bankruptcy as its Venezuelan state owners tried to defend it from a court-ordered compensation.  He's not called T-Rex for nothing.

No wonder the Chavistas are making a stink on Twitter.  There's a new sheriff in town, and he's got no time for their thievery and thuggery.

RECENT VIDEOS