Popularizing the meme of Trump-as-fascist

There is an all-out campaign to plant the words "fascist" and "Trump" together in the public mind.  Josef Goebbels and the advertising industry both know that if people hear or read a pair words together often enough, the brain starts associating them automatically.  This is the theory behind The Big Lie and is also the theory behind advertising that puts the concepts of "Coke" and "refreshing" together so often.

Thus, we have David Brooks, of the New York Times and PBS, expounding on taxpayer-subsidized airways and invoking the f-word for our president.  The entire 12-minute segment is embedded below for those who enjoy being condescended to, but the nut of his rant was excerpted by our friends at Breitbart:

[T]he attack on the press, highlighted by the tweets today saying, that my newspaper, NBC, all these organizations are enemies of the people. Well, if you want to draw rhetoric straight out of the fascist playbook, we're enemies of the vote, the people, that is like – that has so many historical echoes.

If Brooks wants to ring up echoes, he ought to consider the blue bubble echo chamber, where nobody for a moment considers Trump an acceptable president, and that goes for his followers, too.  Within the assumptions already accepted as gospel, almost everything Trump could do would have fascist echoes.  That's because the word "fascist" is constantly echoing in their minds.  They think Trump obviously is fascist.  To think otherwise would imply that they wrongly dismissed a legitimate political movement and missed a historic inflection point.

So if President Trump were to announce new interstate highways as part of his infrastructure program, how long would it take for Hitler's autobahns to be brought up?

 Here is the video:

There is an all-out campaign to plant the words "fascist" and "Trump" together in the public mind.  Josef Goebbels and the advertising industry both know that if people hear or read a pair words together often enough, the brain starts associating them automatically.  This is the theory behind The Big Lie and is also the theory behind advertising that puts the concepts of "Coke" and "refreshing" together so often.

Thus, we have David Brooks, of the New York Times and PBS, expounding on taxpayer-subsidized airways and invoking the f-word for our president.  The entire 12-minute segment is embedded below for those who enjoy being condescended to, but the nut of his rant was excerpted by our friends at Breitbart:

[T]he attack on the press, highlighted by the tweets today saying, that my newspaper, NBC, all these organizations are enemies of the people. Well, if you want to draw rhetoric straight out of the fascist playbook, we're enemies of the vote, the people, that is like – that has so many historical echoes.

If Brooks wants to ring up echoes, he ought to consider the blue bubble echo chamber, where nobody for a moment considers Trump an acceptable president, and that goes for his followers, too.  Within the assumptions already accepted as gospel, almost everything Trump could do would have fascist echoes.  That's because the word "fascist" is constantly echoing in their minds.  They think Trump obviously is fascist.  To think otherwise would imply that they wrongly dismissed a legitimate political movement and missed a historic inflection point.

So if President Trump were to announce new interstate highways as part of his infrastructure program, how long would it take for Hitler's autobahns to be brought up?

 Here is the video:

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