Why Bowe Bergdahl must not be pardoned by Obama on his way out of office

There is good reason to fear that President Obama will grant a pardon to Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl before he leaves office.  Doing so would save the embarrassment of reliving the Rose Garden address with Bergdahl’s parents, the unwarranted praise lavished on him, and most of all, the harms Bergdahl inflicted ion his brothers and sisters in arms.

Eloquent testimony of the harm Bergdahl's inflicted comes from retired U.S. Navy senior chief James Hatch, one of the people assigned to rescue Bergdahl after he deserted his post and was captuired by the enemy.

Hatch is no fake: CNN interviewed him on his rescue mission.

But even better is his personal testimony on his own website, Jimmyhatch.com:

First off, let me introduce myself.  My name is James Hatch, I am a retired US Navy Senior Chief and I worked for the majority of my career in Naval Special Warfare.  My career ended in July of 2009, while I was assigned to a task force in Afghanistan.  One “Sgt. Bergdahl” walked off his post, as I was told, and was immediately captured by the enemy.  My task force which consisted of Army Rangers, Navy Special Warfare Operators, Air Force Special Warfare Operators and US Marines, was tasked with a specific mission to rescue Sgt. Bergdahl.

During that mission, we could have all been killed.  The enemy welcomed us to their area with rocket and machine gun fire.  I cannot believe the helicopters were not shot down.

We immediately split up our force to deal with many different groups of bad guys mixing in with civilians.  Hostage rescue missions are, in my opinion, the most dangerous.

We had a working K9 with us and 2 other shooters, when we encountered the enemy hiding in a ditch and out of sight, the K9 alerted us and was shot in the head, saving our lives, I got a few rounds off at the man who shot the K9 and then I was hit in the leg. The force of the bullet blew my femur apart.

At this point, my friends had to keep me from bleeding to death.  They had to expose themselves to enemy fire and cover open ground under fire from the enemy to get to me and keep me from bleeding to death.

Then, one of the helicopters that dropped us off, came back into the shit show to get me out.

All of us, and I mean every-single-one of us risked our lives that night.

We did so because Sgt. Bergdahl is an American.

I will limp and live with the vision of K9 Remco getting his jaw blown off in front of me, for the rest of my life.

Sgt. Bergdahl’s legal team has asked for a Presidential Pardon from President Obama.

I am speaking for myself and for the thousands, and I do mean thousands of veterans whose lives were affected by the decisions of Sgt. Bergdahl when I say “he should have his day in court.”

Some say “he suffered enough because of his decisions” or “war is bad and his actions were just because he disagreed with it.”

I say he knew the oath he had taken.  There were a myriad of other ways Sgt.Bergdahl could have dealt with his misgivings with his unit or the military.

Sgt. Bergdahl, by his own admission in a very popular podcast, stated that he wanted to “create an event.”

Well, he damn sure did. And others paid for his creation.

Read the whole thing.

Hat tip: FA

There is good reason to fear that President Obama will grant a pardon to Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl before he leaves office.  Doing so would save the embarrassment of reliving the Rose Garden address with Bergdahl’s parents, the unwarranted praise lavished on him, and most of all, the harms Bergdahl inflicted ion his brothers and sisters in arms.

Eloquent testimony of the harm Bergdahl's inflicted comes from retired U.S. Navy senior chief James Hatch, one of the people assigned to rescue Bergdahl after he deserted his post and was captuired by the enemy.

Hatch is no fake: CNN interviewed him on his rescue mission.

But even better is his personal testimony on his own website, Jimmyhatch.com:

First off, let me introduce myself.  My name is James Hatch, I am a retired US Navy Senior Chief and I worked for the majority of my career in Naval Special Warfare.  My career ended in July of 2009, while I was assigned to a task force in Afghanistan.  One “Sgt. Bergdahl” walked off his post, as I was told, and was immediately captured by the enemy.  My task force which consisted of Army Rangers, Navy Special Warfare Operators, Air Force Special Warfare Operators and US Marines, was tasked with a specific mission to rescue Sgt. Bergdahl.

During that mission, we could have all been killed.  The enemy welcomed us to their area with rocket and machine gun fire.  I cannot believe the helicopters were not shot down.

We immediately split up our force to deal with many different groups of bad guys mixing in with civilians.  Hostage rescue missions are, in my opinion, the most dangerous.

We had a working K9 with us and 2 other shooters, when we encountered the enemy hiding in a ditch and out of sight, the K9 alerted us and was shot in the head, saving our lives, I got a few rounds off at the man who shot the K9 and then I was hit in the leg. The force of the bullet blew my femur apart.

At this point, my friends had to keep me from bleeding to death.  They had to expose themselves to enemy fire and cover open ground under fire from the enemy to get to me and keep me from bleeding to death.

Then, one of the helicopters that dropped us off, came back into the shit show to get me out.

All of us, and I mean every-single-one of us risked our lives that night.

We did so because Sgt. Bergdahl is an American.

I will limp and live with the vision of K9 Remco getting his jaw blown off in front of me, for the rest of my life.

Sgt. Bergdahl’s legal team has asked for a Presidential Pardon from President Obama.

I am speaking for myself and for the thousands, and I do mean thousands of veterans whose lives were affected by the decisions of Sgt. Bergdahl when I say “he should have his day in court.”

Some say “he suffered enough because of his decisions” or “war is bad and his actions were just because he disagreed with it.”

I say he knew the oath he had taken.  There were a myriad of other ways Sgt.Bergdahl could have dealt with his misgivings with his unit or the military.

Sgt. Bergdahl, by his own admission in a very popular podcast, stated that he wanted to “create an event.”

Well, he damn sure did. And others paid for his creation.

Read the whole thing.

Hat tip: FA

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