Trump signs executive order signalling the beginning of the end for Obamacare

In one of his first official acts as president, Donald Trump signed an executive order directing all relevant departments and agencies to "ease the burden" of Obamacare regulations on individuals and businesses.

The order effectively guts the Affordable Care Act, making it easier for Congress to repeal it.

The Hill:

 It pushes agencies to target provisions that impose a "fiscal burden" on a state or a "cost" or "regulatory burden" on individuals or businesses. 

It is not clear what practical effects will come from the order.

But the move could eat away at the law's individual mandate by granting more exemptions to people so they do not have to purchase insurance. 

Republicans have also said they want to loosen the rules around ObamaCare's requirements on what healthcare services an insurance plan must cover. 

Congressional action will be needed to make most major changes to the law. 

Trump has made ObamaCare repeal a top priority during his campaign and transition period. He repeatedly pledged to begin rolling back the law on his first day in the White House. 

The move came just hours after Trump took the oath of office at the Capitol. The president was flanked by Vice President Pence, chief of staff Reince Priebus and senior advisers Stephen Bannon and Jared Kushner.

Congress has already taken its first steps toward repealing the law through the complex budget reconciliation process. 

Using that process allows lawmakers to repeal central provisions of the law without the 60 votes needed to break a filibuster. 

Trump's order announces that “it is the policy of my administration to seek the prompt repeal” of ObamaCare, but says that in the interim, "it is imperative for the executive branch to ensure that the law is being efficiently implemented."

In a separate move, Priebus signed a memo ordering a government-wide regulatory freeze until new Cabinet secretaries and agency heads are in place. 

The move is standard practice for incoming administrations; former President Barack Obama issued a similar order in 2009.

 Trump was deliberately vague so that he wouldn't step on the toes of Congress, who ultimately will decide whether to repeal the law in toto or otherwise. But make no mistake. Federal agencies that regulate Obamacare will take actions that will have immediate impact on the size and scope of the law. 

It's the beginning of the end for the worst piece of legislation passed by any Congress in the last 60 years. And it's about time.
 

In one of his first official acts as president, Donald Trump signed an executive order directing all relevant departments and agencies to "ease the burden" of Obamacare regulations on individuals and businesses.

The order effectively guts the Affordable Care Act, making it easier for Congress to repeal it.

The Hill:

 It pushes agencies to target provisions that impose a "fiscal burden" on a state or a "cost" or "regulatory burden" on individuals or businesses. 

It is not clear what practical effects will come from the order.

But the move could eat away at the law's individual mandate by granting more exemptions to people so they do not have to purchase insurance. 

Republicans have also said they want to loosen the rules around ObamaCare's requirements on what healthcare services an insurance plan must cover. 

Congressional action will be needed to make most major changes to the law. 

Trump has made ObamaCare repeal a top priority during his campaign and transition period. He repeatedly pledged to begin rolling back the law on his first day in the White House. 

The move came just hours after Trump took the oath of office at the Capitol. The president was flanked by Vice President Pence, chief of staff Reince Priebus and senior advisers Stephen Bannon and Jared Kushner.

Congress has already taken its first steps toward repealing the law through the complex budget reconciliation process. 

Using that process allows lawmakers to repeal central provisions of the law without the 60 votes needed to break a filibuster. 

Trump's order announces that “it is the policy of my administration to seek the prompt repeal” of ObamaCare, but says that in the interim, "it is imperative for the executive branch to ensure that the law is being efficiently implemented."

In a separate move, Priebus signed a memo ordering a government-wide regulatory freeze until new Cabinet secretaries and agency heads are in place. 

The move is standard practice for incoming administrations; former President Barack Obama issued a similar order in 2009.

 Trump was deliberately vague so that he wouldn't step on the toes of Congress, who ultimately will decide whether to repeal the law in toto or otherwise. But make no mistake. Federal agencies that regulate Obamacare will take actions that will have immediate impact on the size and scope of the law. 

It's the beginning of the end for the worst piece of legislation passed by any Congress in the last 60 years. And it's about time.
 

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