Epidemic of virtue-signaling ravaging blue enclaves in response to Trump’s pause in entry from 7 countries

As the left goes into full tantrum mode, virtue-signaling is breaking out in Hollywood, on campus, and even throughout those elements of corporate America that serve markets they believe are populated by Trump-haters.  Hollywood had yet another award show in which it pats itself on the back last night, and the privileged and pampered took the opportunity to proclaim their love for the downtrodden who may have to wait a few days while immigration authorities vet them.  It was a union-sponsored gala, run by the Screen Actors Guild, so of course the leftism was especially intense.

And silly:

Academia is also behaving according to longstanding patterns, as always combining virtue-signaling with self-interest.  A dirty little secret of the vast higher education industry is that Middle Eastern students from wealthy countries usually pay the inflated full price for tuition and become lucrative cash cows, since no discounts off list prices (aka “scholarships”) are required when an emir or king of a petrostate is paying for his subjects’ education on these shores.  The Wall Street Journal:

More than 17,000 students from the seven countries listed in Mr. Trump’s order were enrolled at U.S. schools in the 2015-2016 year, according to the Institute of International Education, while more than 2,000 such teachers and researchers were at U.S. colleges and universities

Many college presidents and higher-education associations, including the Association of American Universities, which represents 62 major schools, and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, representing 237 state and land-grant institutions and affiliated organizations, issued statements Saturday condemning Mr. Trump’s order and warned it could damage the U.S. role as a leader in global academics.

A petition called “Academics Against Immigration Executive Order” had attracted nearly 15,000 signatures Sunday, including at least 5,000 from faculty. The signatories included 35 Nobel Prize winners and came from colleges and universities from around the nation. The petition was drawn up by a group of Iranian academics and former academics on Thursday evening, said Maryam Saeedi, a professor of economics at Carnegie Mellon University and one of the organizers.

I don’t remember any such protests when President Carter suspended issuance of visas to entrants from Iran.

In corporate America, companies that primarily locate in large cities, and especially those that appeal to younger, affluent urban dwellers, are also adopting a political posture.  Consider this blast email sent by Lyft (the taxi-substituting  competitor for Uber) to those registered with it:

Defending Our Values

We created Lyft to be a model for the type of community we want our world to be: diverse, inclusive, and safe. 

This weekend, Trump closed the country's borders to refugees, immigrants, and even documented residents from around the world based on their country of origin. Banning people of a particular faith or creed, race or identity, sexuality or ethnicity, from entering the U.S. is antithetical to both Lyft's and our nation's core values. We stand firmly against these actions, and will not be silent on issues that threaten the values of our community. 

We know this directly impacts many of our community members, their families, and friends. We stand with you, and are donating $1,000,000 over the next four years to the ACLU to defend our constitution. We ask that you continue to be there for each other - and together, continue proving the power of community.

John & Logan

Lyft Co-Founders

Update.  Doug Mainwaring sends us an email he received from the "People's Action Team" urging a boycott of Uber for being insufficiently against Trump:

As the left goes into full tantrum mode, virtue-signaling is breaking out in Hollywood, on campus, and even throughout those elements of corporate America that serve markets they believe are populated by Trump-haters.  Hollywood had yet another award show in which it pats itself on the back last night, and the privileged and pampered took the opportunity to proclaim their love for the downtrodden who may have to wait a few days while immigration authorities vet them.  It was a union-sponsored gala, run by the Screen Actors Guild, so of course the leftism was especially intense.

And silly:

Academia is also behaving according to longstanding patterns, as always combining virtue-signaling with self-interest.  A dirty little secret of the vast higher education industry is that Middle Eastern students from wealthy countries usually pay the inflated full price for tuition and become lucrative cash cows, since no discounts off list prices (aka “scholarships”) are required when an emir or king of a petrostate is paying for his subjects’ education on these shores.  The Wall Street Journal:

More than 17,000 students from the seven countries listed in Mr. Trump’s order were enrolled at U.S. schools in the 2015-2016 year, according to the Institute of International Education, while more than 2,000 such teachers and researchers were at U.S. colleges and universities

Many college presidents and higher-education associations, including the Association of American Universities, which represents 62 major schools, and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, representing 237 state and land-grant institutions and affiliated organizations, issued statements Saturday condemning Mr. Trump’s order and warned it could damage the U.S. role as a leader in global academics.

A petition called “Academics Against Immigration Executive Order” had attracted nearly 15,000 signatures Sunday, including at least 5,000 from faculty. The signatories included 35 Nobel Prize winners and came from colleges and universities from around the nation. The petition was drawn up by a group of Iranian academics and former academics on Thursday evening, said Maryam Saeedi, a professor of economics at Carnegie Mellon University and one of the organizers.

I don’t remember any such protests when President Carter suspended issuance of visas to entrants from Iran.

In corporate America, companies that primarily locate in large cities, and especially those that appeal to younger, affluent urban dwellers, are also adopting a political posture.  Consider this blast email sent by Lyft (the taxi-substituting  competitor for Uber) to those registered with it:

Defending Our Values

We created Lyft to be a model for the type of community we want our world to be: diverse, inclusive, and safe. 

This weekend, Trump closed the country's borders to refugees, immigrants, and even documented residents from around the world based on their country of origin. Banning people of a particular faith or creed, race or identity, sexuality or ethnicity, from entering the U.S. is antithetical to both Lyft's and our nation's core values. We stand firmly against these actions, and will not be silent on issues that threaten the values of our community. 

We know this directly impacts many of our community members, their families, and friends. We stand with you, and are donating $1,000,000 over the next four years to the ACLU to defend our constitution. We ask that you continue to be there for each other - and together, continue proving the power of community.

John & Logan

Lyft Co-Founders

Update.  Doug Mainwaring sends us an email he received from the "People's Action Team" urging a boycott of Uber for being insufficiently against Trump:

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