A tale of two marches

Two weekends ago at the “Women’s March,” hundreds of thousands of women demonstrated in Washington, D.C. and cities across the county.  What they were protesting was a little hard to discern – Donald Trump’s nascent presidency; the right to abortion; or, judging by the number of women donning costumes of female genitalia, the right to be vulgar and offensive.

Whatever it was, it had little in common with a march that took place last weekend, when hundreds of thousands of women joined as many men to march in D.C. and across the country.

The women who marched at the annual March for Life were there to demonstrate against Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case in which seven men on the Supreme Court decided that regulations on most abortions are unconstitutional.

They were also there because they object to and are appalled by the notion that the intentional killing of their children is somehow pro-woman or an exercise of love.  They marched as a witness to the idea that motherhood is the ultimate expression of true femininity.

Some pro-life women showed an interest in joining the Women’s March but were ultimately told they were not welcome.  Somehow, the notion that to be a woman is to support abortion rights has taken hold.

But polls have consistently found that most women reject most abortions.  According to a recent Marist poll, 77 percent of women support limiting abortion to the first trimester or earlier.  That’s more than the 74 percent of all Americans who believe in those limits.

Most women believe that abortion is not something to be celebrated or even a necessary evil.  Although it is sometimes portrayed as an act of female autonomy, abortion is often accompanied by coercion and abuse by men.  A report by the Guttmacher Institute, a pro-abortion-rights research organization, found that nearly a third of women who abort say they made that decision because of insufficient support from their partners, coercion, or outright abuse. 

Every year at this time, pollsters release polls showing that a majority of Americans support Roe v. Wade and think it should be upheld.  That is because surveys show that most Americans think of it as a proxy of sorts for abortion rights.  Most seem to believe that if it were overturned, all abortions would instantly become illegal.

But that’s not true.  If Roe were overturned, the matter would simply be returned to the states, where each state could decide based on its citizens’ desire whether and how much to regulate the procedure.

New data show that the number of abortions performed yearly in America has reached an all-time low.  That’s in part because science and technology have humanized the unborn child.

Abortion rights advocates used to be able to get away with calling an unborn baby a “clump of cells.”  But not anymore.  Ultrasound and other fetal technology have allowed us to recognize unborn children as the human beings they are.

As President Trump’s adviser Kellyanne Conway told the crowd at the March for Life, “science and medicine have joined religion and morality in causing many Americans to rethink just how fragile and how triumphant human life truly is.”

And that, ultimately, was what the March for Life is about.  Attendees don’t march against something as much as they march as an affirmation and celebration of the basic truth that a child’s birth is always a triumph.

Former presidential candidate Gary Bauer is chairman of the Campaign for Working Families, president of American Values, and co-host of the Bauer and Rose show on SiriusXM Patriot.

Two weekends ago at the “Women’s March,” hundreds of thousands of women demonstrated in Washington, D.C. and cities across the county.  What they were protesting was a little hard to discern – Donald Trump’s nascent presidency; the right to abortion; or, judging by the number of women donning costumes of female genitalia, the right to be vulgar and offensive.

Whatever it was, it had little in common with a march that took place last weekend, when hundreds of thousands of women joined as many men to march in D.C. and across the country.

The women who marched at the annual March for Life were there to demonstrate against Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case in which seven men on the Supreme Court decided that regulations on most abortions are unconstitutional.

They were also there because they object to and are appalled by the notion that the intentional killing of their children is somehow pro-woman or an exercise of love.  They marched as a witness to the idea that motherhood is the ultimate expression of true femininity.

Some pro-life women showed an interest in joining the Women’s March but were ultimately told they were not welcome.  Somehow, the notion that to be a woman is to support abortion rights has taken hold.

But polls have consistently found that most women reject most abortions.  According to a recent Marist poll, 77 percent of women support limiting abortion to the first trimester or earlier.  That’s more than the 74 percent of all Americans who believe in those limits.

Most women believe that abortion is not something to be celebrated or even a necessary evil.  Although it is sometimes portrayed as an act of female autonomy, abortion is often accompanied by coercion and abuse by men.  A report by the Guttmacher Institute, a pro-abortion-rights research organization, found that nearly a third of women who abort say they made that decision because of insufficient support from their partners, coercion, or outright abuse. 

Every year at this time, pollsters release polls showing that a majority of Americans support Roe v. Wade and think it should be upheld.  That is because surveys show that most Americans think of it as a proxy of sorts for abortion rights.  Most seem to believe that if it were overturned, all abortions would instantly become illegal.

But that’s not true.  If Roe were overturned, the matter would simply be returned to the states, where each state could decide based on its citizens’ desire whether and how much to regulate the procedure.

New data show that the number of abortions performed yearly in America has reached an all-time low.  That’s in part because science and technology have humanized the unborn child.

Abortion rights advocates used to be able to get away with calling an unborn baby a “clump of cells.”  But not anymore.  Ultrasound and other fetal technology have allowed us to recognize unborn children as the human beings they are.

As President Trump’s adviser Kellyanne Conway told the crowd at the March for Life, “science and medicine have joined religion and morality in causing many Americans to rethink just how fragile and how triumphant human life truly is.”

And that, ultimately, was what the March for Life is about.  Attendees don’t march against something as much as they march as an affirmation and celebration of the basic truth that a child’s birth is always a triumph.

Former presidential candidate Gary Bauer is chairman of the Campaign for Working Families, president of American Values, and co-host of the Bauer and Rose show on SiriusXM Patriot.

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