Unions and their Democratic allies losing ‘bigly’ in the wake of Trump-led GOP sweep

The large-scale money-laundering operation operated by the Democratic Party and its union boss allies will dwindle even farther in the next four years.  The practice of forcing workers to join a union and give up a portion of their wages, which is then recycled into Democratic Party “donations,” is likely to become illegal in a number of states.  Reid Wilson writes about this forthcoming change in The Hill, using prejudicial language common in the media when discussing unions.

Labor unions have been on the defense in states like Wisconsin, Ohio and North Carolina in recent years, after Republicans swept to power in the 2010 midterm elections. Republicans in those states have advanced measures limiting public employee unions’ collective bargaining rights and unions’ power to compel workers to contribute dues.

Can we please stop pretending that collective bargaining is a “right”?  It is privilege, a legally sanctioned form of monopsony of the workforce that would otherwise be illegal as a conspiracy to monopolize the supply of labor.  And the rights of workers to refuse to join the union are trampled when union membership is required in order to be hired.

Instead of attacking “rights” of unions, the GOP is planning  to restore rights of workers.  Four states are ripe for installing right to work laws:

Democrats have held firm in states such as New Hampshire, Missouri, Kentucky and Iowa, where the party maintained enough of a toehold to block anti-union measures. But November’s elections gave Republicans big wins in those states, paving the way for an aggressive new campaign to undermine Democrats’ once-powerful labor allies.

“Labor had a disastrous election in the Rust Belt,” said Jake Bookwalter, who lobbies state governments at Stateside Associates.

Republican leaders in New Hampshire, Missouri and Kentucky are planning in the coming months to take up and pass so-called right-to-work measures, allowing workers to opt out of joining a union and out of paying union dues. 

If these efforts succeed, and it is hard to see effective obstacles, thirty states – 60% – will have enacted right to work laws.

It’s a good start.  “Structural change” means permanently weakening unions, a fundamental pillar of the Democrats’ coalition.  With his job creation, Donald Trump will do more for workers than unoins have for decades.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky

The large-scale money-laundering operation operated by the Democratic Party and its union boss allies will dwindle even farther in the next four years.  The practice of forcing workers to join a union and give up a portion of their wages, which is then recycled into Democratic Party “donations,” is likely to become illegal in a number of states.  Reid Wilson writes about this forthcoming change in The Hill, using prejudicial language common in the media when discussing unions.

Labor unions have been on the defense in states like Wisconsin, Ohio and North Carolina in recent years, after Republicans swept to power in the 2010 midterm elections. Republicans in those states have advanced measures limiting public employee unions’ collective bargaining rights and unions’ power to compel workers to contribute dues.

Can we please stop pretending that collective bargaining is a “right”?  It is privilege, a legally sanctioned form of monopsony of the workforce that would otherwise be illegal as a conspiracy to monopolize the supply of labor.  And the rights of workers to refuse to join the union are trampled when union membership is required in order to be hired.

Instead of attacking “rights” of unions, the GOP is planning  to restore rights of workers.  Four states are ripe for installing right to work laws:

Democrats have held firm in states such as New Hampshire, Missouri, Kentucky and Iowa, where the party maintained enough of a toehold to block anti-union measures. But November’s elections gave Republicans big wins in those states, paving the way for an aggressive new campaign to undermine Democrats’ once-powerful labor allies.

“Labor had a disastrous election in the Rust Belt,” said Jake Bookwalter, who lobbies state governments at Stateside Associates.

Republican leaders in New Hampshire, Missouri and Kentucky are planning in the coming months to take up and pass so-called right-to-work measures, allowing workers to opt out of joining a union and out of paying union dues. 

If these efforts succeed, and it is hard to see effective obstacles, thirty states – 60% – will have enacted right to work laws.

It’s a good start.  “Structural change” means permanently weakening unions, a fundamental pillar of the Democrats’ coalition.  With his job creation, Donald Trump will do more for workers than unoins have for decades.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky

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