The climate con game: British taxpayers discover $350 million ‘can’t be tracked’

The global warming fraud is the greatest con game in the history of mankind.  Unraveling the web of chicanery will take at least as many years as establishing the fraud required, since the guilty parties that have profited immensely likely have taken steps to cover their tracks.

But one red flag has just become apparent in the United Kingdom.  Martin Robinson of the U.K. Daily Mail reports:

Britain has handed £274million [$348.7 million at this morning’s exchange rate)to a controversial climate change organisation and admits it doesn't even know what it was spent on.

The foreign aid donation to the Strategic Climate Fund was agreed so the Government can can meet its pledge to spend 0.7 per cent of national income on foreign aid.

The fund runs projects in Haiti, Yemen and Cambodia but the United States has warned it might stop sending aid to these countries because their governments are considered among the most corrupt in the world.

The Strategic Climate Change Fund has an $8billion (£6.3billion) annual budget and Britain is among its biggest donors.

But when The Times asked The Department for International Development (DfID) how it £274million donation was spent on it responded: 'DfID does not hold the information relevant to your request'.

Sending money to Haiti without any supervision ought to be a criminal offense for a government official.

Alas, we can thank good-hearted former President George W. Bush for the Strategic Climate Change Fund.  He believed what he was told by people mistakenly regarded as credible.

The Strategic Climate Fund was set up by President George W Bush in 2008 to help poorer nations tackle climate change but there are deep concerns in the US about the countries it is spent in.

If you think American funds sent to third-world countries have been better spent than British funds, you are far too optimistic about the Obama administration.

What leaps out at me from the details of the Daily Mail report is the degree to which influential people have been paid off to attempt to co-opt them into full-throated support of the con.

Channel 4 News presenter Krishnan Guru-Murthy was paid £15,000 in taxpayer cash from Britain’s foreign aid budget for just several hours’ work at a junket.

He faced embarrassment when he claimed to be unaware that the money for his trip to Mexico came from the public purse, and promised to give it back to charity.

Mr Guru-Murthy was joined at the summit by BBC News presenter Zeinab Badawi, who cost £14,000 to hire through an agency.

International Development Secretary Priti Patel has launched an investigation following the revelations, including the payment to Mr Guru-Murthy. She is considering forcing aid providers to publish all their contracts for scrutiny.

The agency through which Mr Guru-Murthy was hired charged £26,000. Both he and Miss Badawi chaired meetings attended by ministers at the two-day event in Mexico in 2014 hosted by the Global Partnership for Effective Development.

It is understood that Mr Guru-Murthy received £15,000 and paid his agent £2,250. He has promised to donate his fee to a development charity and said he would not have carried out the work if he had known it was being funded by the Department for International Development (DfiD).

So this two-day event in Mexico ended up costing British taxpayers £55,000 ($70,000) for chairing two panels, presumably among several.  How much were the panelists paid?  I am guessing they did not fly to the event in coach, nor did they stay at the Holiday Inn Express.  How much money was squandered on luxury, and on what look more like payoffs than speakers’ fees?

Hmm, come to think of it, fees paid to speakers have a long history as bribes.

Compared to the trillions at stake in the con, $350 million is chicken feed.  But it's a start.

The global warming fraud is the greatest con game in the history of mankind.  Unraveling the web of chicanery will take at least as many years as establishing the fraud required, since the guilty parties that have profited immensely likely have taken steps to cover their tracks.

But one red flag has just become apparent in the United Kingdom.  Martin Robinson of the U.K. Daily Mail reports:

Britain has handed £274million [$348.7 million at this morning’s exchange rate)to a controversial climate change organisation and admits it doesn't even know what it was spent on.

The foreign aid donation to the Strategic Climate Fund was agreed so the Government can can meet its pledge to spend 0.7 per cent of national income on foreign aid.

The fund runs projects in Haiti, Yemen and Cambodia but the United States has warned it might stop sending aid to these countries because their governments are considered among the most corrupt in the world.

The Strategic Climate Change Fund has an $8billion (£6.3billion) annual budget and Britain is among its biggest donors.

But when The Times asked The Department for International Development (DfID) how it £274million donation was spent on it responded: 'DfID does not hold the information relevant to your request'.

Sending money to Haiti without any supervision ought to be a criminal offense for a government official.

Alas, we can thank good-hearted former President George W. Bush for the Strategic Climate Change Fund.  He believed what he was told by people mistakenly regarded as credible.

The Strategic Climate Fund was set up by President George W Bush in 2008 to help poorer nations tackle climate change but there are deep concerns in the US about the countries it is spent in.

If you think American funds sent to third-world countries have been better spent than British funds, you are far too optimistic about the Obama administration.

What leaps out at me from the details of the Daily Mail report is the degree to which influential people have been paid off to attempt to co-opt them into full-throated support of the con.

Channel 4 News presenter Krishnan Guru-Murthy was paid £15,000 in taxpayer cash from Britain’s foreign aid budget for just several hours’ work at a junket.

He faced embarrassment when he claimed to be unaware that the money for his trip to Mexico came from the public purse, and promised to give it back to charity.

Mr Guru-Murthy was joined at the summit by BBC News presenter Zeinab Badawi, who cost £14,000 to hire through an agency.

International Development Secretary Priti Patel has launched an investigation following the revelations, including the payment to Mr Guru-Murthy. She is considering forcing aid providers to publish all their contracts for scrutiny.

The agency through which Mr Guru-Murthy was hired charged £26,000. Both he and Miss Badawi chaired meetings attended by ministers at the two-day event in Mexico in 2014 hosted by the Global Partnership for Effective Development.

It is understood that Mr Guru-Murthy received £15,000 and paid his agent £2,250. He has promised to donate his fee to a development charity and said he would not have carried out the work if he had known it was being funded by the Department for International Development (DfiD).

So this two-day event in Mexico ended up costing British taxpayers £55,000 ($70,000) for chairing two panels, presumably among several.  How much were the panelists paid?  I am guessing they did not fly to the event in coach, nor did they stay at the Holiday Inn Express.  How much money was squandered on luxury, and on what look more like payoffs than speakers’ fees?

Hmm, come to think of it, fees paid to speakers have a long history as bribes.

Compared to the trillions at stake in the con, $350 million is chicken feed.  But it's a start.

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