Kellyanne Conway, the presidential counselor

When I learned yesterday that Kellyanne Conway had persuaded her husband and three of her four children to move to Washington, D.C. to serve in the Trump administration, I sighed in relief.  As was obvious to anyone who watched the Trump campaign before and after she joined it, her advice was listened to, heeded, and beneficial to the candidate. 

Her statement to the Mika Brzezinski on Morning Joe leads me to believe that she really meant it earlier when she announced that she would stay in New York with her family.

“The President-Elect is a very persuasive man.”

The vaguely defined role of “counselor to the president” will give her the flexibility to integrate her roles of mom and adviser in a way that works best for everyone.  There can be little doubt that the president-elect values her advice, and will do whatever necessary to get as much of it as her other commitments will permit.

As the Trump administration is forming before our eyes, some of the hysteria peddled by the media about Trump and women will fade away.  Donald Trump has a history of hiring, promoting, and respecting women in his organization.  Whatever joking comments he may have made years ago, where it counts, he is as supportive of women’s professional opportunities as any male boss you could find.  When he trusts an executive, he delegates lavishly.

I suspect that inevitably, the story about how Kellyanne Conway copes with her two roles will become public.  There is just so much interest in the topic, especially on the part of working women, that the media will not let her and her family alone.  Some of the attention will be boorish, of course.  But the nation will see the president role modeling accommodation for a working mother.   There is every reason to believe that she will become an icon of a working mom.  This may help change a few minds among the majority of women who customarily vote Democrat.

Because this narrative would benefit her boss, I suspect that Kellyanne (like Ivanka) will do as much as possible to shield her children from the boors, but that the story of her life will become part of the narrative of the Trump years.  The master of reality television probably would have it no other way.

When I learned yesterday that Kellyanne Conway had persuaded her husband and three of her four children to move to Washington, D.C. to serve in the Trump administration, I sighed in relief.  As was obvious to anyone who watched the Trump campaign before and after she joined it, her advice was listened to, heeded, and beneficial to the candidate. 

Her statement to the Mika Brzezinski on Morning Joe leads me to believe that she really meant it earlier when she announced that she would stay in New York with her family.

“The President-Elect is a very persuasive man.”

The vaguely defined role of “counselor to the president” will give her the flexibility to integrate her roles of mom and adviser in a way that works best for everyone.  There can be little doubt that the president-elect values her advice, and will do whatever necessary to get as much of it as her other commitments will permit.

As the Trump administration is forming before our eyes, some of the hysteria peddled by the media about Trump and women will fade away.  Donald Trump has a history of hiring, promoting, and respecting women in his organization.  Whatever joking comments he may have made years ago, where it counts, he is as supportive of women’s professional opportunities as any male boss you could find.  When he trusts an executive, he delegates lavishly.

I suspect that inevitably, the story about how Kellyanne Conway copes with her two roles will become public.  There is just so much interest in the topic, especially on the part of working women, that the media will not let her and her family alone.  Some of the attention will be boorish, of course.  But the nation will see the president role modeling accommodation for a working mother.   There is every reason to believe that she will become an icon of a working mom.  This may help change a few minds among the majority of women who customarily vote Democrat.

Because this narrative would benefit her boss, I suspect that Kellyanne (like Ivanka) will do as much as possible to shield her children from the boors, but that the story of her life will become part of the narrative of the Trump years.  The master of reality television probably would have it no other way.

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