House Dems re-elect Pelosi as leader; rearrange deck chairs on Titanic

House Democrats re-elected Nancy Pelosi as minority leader, but more than one third of members voted against her.

Pelosi announced a series of "reforms" she says will give younger members more say in legislation.  But as far as changing the face of the party, that's not going to happen.  The aging members in leadership positions will remain, while Pelosi adds a few token spots to be filled specifically by junior members.

Politico:

Pelosi will back the election of the chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, according to a letter she sent to her colleagues Wednesday night.

The California Democrat will also throw her weight behind plans to add five new leadership spots, including two for junior members, the letter states.

And Pelosi will back the creation of "vice chairs" or "vice ranking members" within the committee structure, a move designed to give junior members more say on what happens within panels.

Pelosi beat a challenge from Ohio Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for minority leaders earlier on Wednesday by a 134-63 vote. The opposition to Pelosi was greater than many expected, although the California Democrat had predicted she'd get "two-thirds" of the caucus.

While she remains atop the Democratic Caucus, Pelosi is aware there remains serious dissension within her ranks, much of it based on the fact that the caucus is top-heavy with veteran lawmakers. That shuts out more junior members from having a role in policy and messaging.

Pelosi also knew that if these proposals came up for a vote in Thursday's planned caucus meeting — and there were amendments on several of them — she might end up on the wrong side of the issue. So, she moved to head off the fight before it ever got that far.

Pelosi has presided over a historic collapse in the number of Democrats in the House, from a near supermajority in 2009 of 256-178 to their current minority position of of 194-241.  Her desire to throw a few bones to junior members of her caucus is little better than rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic

After a defeat like what the Dems suffered on November 8, there should have been a wholesale turnover of the leadership, getting fresh blood to reinvigorate the party.  Instead, the same tired old leaders who have outlived their usefulness will have to deal with a nearly united Republican Party and Donald Trump.

House Democrats re-elected Nancy Pelosi as minority leader, but more than one third of members voted against her.

Pelosi announced a series of "reforms" she says will give younger members more say in legislation.  But as far as changing the face of the party, that's not going to happen.  The aging members in leadership positions will remain, while Pelosi adds a few token spots to be filled specifically by junior members.

Politico:

Pelosi will back the election of the chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, according to a letter she sent to her colleagues Wednesday night.

The California Democrat will also throw her weight behind plans to add five new leadership spots, including two for junior members, the letter states.

And Pelosi will back the creation of "vice chairs" or "vice ranking members" within the committee structure, a move designed to give junior members more say on what happens within panels.

Pelosi beat a challenge from Ohio Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for minority leaders earlier on Wednesday by a 134-63 vote. The opposition to Pelosi was greater than many expected, although the California Democrat had predicted she'd get "two-thirds" of the caucus.

While she remains atop the Democratic Caucus, Pelosi is aware there remains serious dissension within her ranks, much of it based on the fact that the caucus is top-heavy with veteran lawmakers. That shuts out more junior members from having a role in policy and messaging.

Pelosi also knew that if these proposals came up for a vote in Thursday's planned caucus meeting — and there were amendments on several of them — she might end up on the wrong side of the issue. So, she moved to head off the fight before it ever got that far.

Pelosi has presided over a historic collapse in the number of Democrats in the House, from a near supermajority in 2009 of 256-178 to their current minority position of of 194-241.  Her desire to throw a few bones to junior members of her caucus is little better than rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic

After a defeat like what the Dems suffered on November 8, there should have been a wholesale turnover of the leadership, getting fresh blood to reinvigorate the party.  Instead, the same tired old leaders who have outlived their usefulness will have to deal with a nearly united Republican Party and Donald Trump.

RECENT VIDEOS