Debbie Reynolds’ death reminds us of the importance of the will to live

We don’t ordinarily pay much attention to celebrity deaths around here, unless there is a political angle to them. But death of 84 year-old Debbie Reynolds following on the passing of her daughter Carrie Fisher is so intensely human and heart-breaking that it becomes a signal event in the culture, one from which meaning will be drawn, mostly privately.

I doubt that I am at all unusual in having seen a loved one give up the will to live and rapidly pass away, usually in the senior years from some condition that was chronic but seemingly under control. Most often a spouse dies and the mate soon follows.

One lesson here is that our emotional state directly affects our physical health. But beyond that dry language lies something more elemental: life is an active choice.  There is something deeply buried, some call it the survival instinct, that impels us to  choose life  -- for ourselves, at least – instinctively. But life takes its toll and can blunt that instinct, even smother it.

I have to wonder, as an observer of the mass psychosis of Trump Derangement Syndrome, if there might be a public health dimension ahead, owing to a diminution of the will to live on the part of the more unstable political extremists on the left. It really does appear as if large numbers of leftists/feminists/elitists are being driven mad with their grief. If President Trump thrives in office, is there a danger of people on the left simply giving up on their will to live and falling victim to the health challenges a healthy psyche would help overcome?

I am not wishing for lefty genocide; quite the contrary, I want help for these people.

We don’t ordinarily pay much attention to celebrity deaths around here, unless there is a political angle to them. But death of 84 year-old Debbie Reynolds following on the passing of her daughter Carrie Fisher is so intensely human and heart-breaking that it becomes a signal event in the culture, one from which meaning will be drawn, mostly privately.

I doubt that I am at all unusual in having seen a loved one give up the will to live and rapidly pass away, usually in the senior years from some condition that was chronic but seemingly under control. Most often a spouse dies and the mate soon follows.

One lesson here is that our emotional state directly affects our physical health. But beyond that dry language lies something more elemental: life is an active choice.  There is something deeply buried, some call it the survival instinct, that impels us to  choose life  -- for ourselves, at least – instinctively. But life takes its toll and can blunt that instinct, even smother it.

I have to wonder, as an observer of the mass psychosis of Trump Derangement Syndrome, if there might be a public health dimension ahead, owing to a diminution of the will to live on the part of the more unstable political extremists on the left. It really does appear as if large numbers of leftists/feminists/elitists are being driven mad with their grief. If President Trump thrives in office, is there a danger of people on the left simply giving up on their will to live and falling victim to the health challenges a healthy psyche would help overcome?

I am not wishing for lefty genocide; quite the contrary, I want help for these people.

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