Check out the art on the new Second Avenue subway stop

In the Soviet Union, art was just another tool to indoctrinate the masses in class struggle.  Everything revolved around class.

In New York City, art is just another tool not just to indoctrinate the masses on class struggle, but also to divide us on race and sexuality.  Nowhere is that more evident than in the art installations in the long awaited Second Avenue subway station on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, set to open in early January.

Check out the lady in the photo below.  It's been decades since black people had afros that big.

But in New York, it's always the 1960s.

See the photo above.  Four Hispanics, one black girl (kind of), and a white kid.  I'm surprised they have even one white kid.  If the other five hadn't ordered pizza, he wouldn't even be there.  He looks kind of scared.  Maybe he doesn't speak Spanish.

Actually, I'm surprised that black people aren't up in arms over this one.  It has become routine to marginalize white men in art and advertisements, but here we see that Hispanics have a four-to-one ratio on the sort of black lady.  Imagine if this installation had four white boys and only one black girl – do you think the black community would be silent then?  And what about Asians, the invisible minority?  No one ever complains when they are shortchanged.  And why no hijabis?  The more I look at it, the less and less progressive this piece of art becomes!

Here we have two men, either about to go to work or about to go on a blue-collar honeymoon.  You see, it is not enough to have a photo or a painting of a man who is gay; we must have an exhibit of a man who is "caught in the act" of being gay, since people who are gay are defined by their sexual acts, according to liberals who control the art world and mainstream media.

The only thing missing from the installation above is an explanatory caption.  After all, I have no idea if I am looking at two gay men or two men who, in their minds, have transgendered to women and thus now are lesbians.

The most logical kind of art for a Manhattan subway stop, of course, is art representing the region.  There are more than enough photos and paintings of the New York skyline that could cover the subway from end to end, but those are merely tributes to aesthetics, not identity politics, so they will never do.

If you're in New York and want to see a subway stop done well, I suggest you stop at the one by the Museum of Natural History.

"For Want of a Nail," Arts for Transit Collaborative, glass and ceramic mosaic, handmade ceramic tile relief, hand-cast glass, bronze, and cut granite, 81st Street Station Eighth Avenue line, Museum of Natural History stop

If such an exhibit were made today, it would never do, unless we knew the race of the shark and the sexual orientation of the starfish.

What do you think of the art on this Second Avenue subway stop?

Ed Straker is the senior writer at NewsMachete.com.

In the Soviet Union, art was just another tool to indoctrinate the masses in class struggle.  Everything revolved around class.

In New York City, art is just another tool not just to indoctrinate the masses on class struggle, but also to divide us on race and sexuality.  Nowhere is that more evident than in the art installations in the long awaited Second Avenue subway station on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, set to open in early January.

Check out the lady in the photo below.  It's been decades since black people had afros that big.

But in New York, it's always the 1960s.

See the photo above.  Four Hispanics, one black girl (kind of), and a white kid.  I'm surprised they have even one white kid.  If the other five hadn't ordered pizza, he wouldn't even be there.  He looks kind of scared.  Maybe he doesn't speak Spanish.

Actually, I'm surprised that black people aren't up in arms over this one.  It has become routine to marginalize white men in art and advertisements, but here we see that Hispanics have a four-to-one ratio on the sort of black lady.  Imagine if this installation had four white boys and only one black girl – do you think the black community would be silent then?  And what about Asians, the invisible minority?  No one ever complains when they are shortchanged.  And why no hijabis?  The more I look at it, the less and less progressive this piece of art becomes!

Here we have two men, either about to go to work or about to go on a blue-collar honeymoon.  You see, it is not enough to have a photo or a painting of a man who is gay; we must have an exhibit of a man who is "caught in the act" of being gay, since people who are gay are defined by their sexual acts, according to liberals who control the art world and mainstream media.

The only thing missing from the installation above is an explanatory caption.  After all, I have no idea if I am looking at two gay men or two men who, in their minds, have transgendered to women and thus now are lesbians.

The most logical kind of art for a Manhattan subway stop, of course, is art representing the region.  There are more than enough photos and paintings of the New York skyline that could cover the subway from end to end, but those are merely tributes to aesthetics, not identity politics, so they will never do.

If you're in New York and want to see a subway stop done well, I suggest you stop at the one by the Museum of Natural History.

"For Want of a Nail," Arts for Transit Collaborative, glass and ceramic mosaic, handmade ceramic tile relief, hand-cast glass, bronze, and cut granite, 81st Street Station Eighth Avenue line, Museum of Natural History stop

If such an exhibit were made today, it would never do, unless we knew the race of the shark and the sexual orientation of the starfish.

What do you think of the art on this Second Avenue subway stop?

Ed Straker is the senior writer at NewsMachete.com.

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