Illegal alien Harvard grad cries through 27 rolls of toilet paper

It's getting harder and harder to write an original "illegal aliens feel terrified by Trump" article simply because so many have been written.  Topping the level of hysteria of the previous ones becomes more and more difficult.  But the WaPo may have succeeded with this story of a super-virtuous illegal alien named Lisette Candia Diaz, who went to Harvard and then, when Donald Trump won the election, had a mental breakdown on the toilet.

First, the virtue:

My Harvard acceptance proved it was all worth it: the blood that covered my dad's hands after his long shifts, the tears my mom shed because she missed her family in Chile, the frustration they both endured from being unable to fulfill their full potential, all of the times they were humiliated because they didn't speak English well enough or understand American culture.

Some thoughts:

1) Blood on her father's hands?  Diaz doesn't say his profession.  Did he work in a slaughterhouse, or was he a contract killer for a drug cartel?

2) If her mother missed her family in Chile, why didn't she go home?

3) The parents came to the country illegally and felt humiliated when they didn't learn English?

I spent election night on the bathroom floor of my apartment. I curled my body into a ball and lay on the floor of the same bathroom I had nervously cleaned earlier in the day. I counted and recounted the tiles on the floor. I stared at the white ceiling as static noise filled my ears. The results poured in on my phone. Between wiping my eyes and blowing my nose, I made my way through the rolls of toilet paper in our cabinet. We had 27 rolls of toilet paper.

Is this a mental breakdown or merely the sign of a guilty conscience?  Maybe "I broke the law, and they are finally going to catch up with me!"

I was told that if I worked hard, then everything would turn out okay. I did all my homework on time; I always raised my hand before speaking; I followed all of the rules.

Diaz has the same attitude as the immigrant drug dealer who says she too followed all the rules.  Except for one big one: illegally entering the country.

My migraines are getting worse. Three weeks out, and sometimes I lie on my bed because I don't have the energy to get up. I relive Nov. 8 in my head.

Do you think that if Diaz saw a doctor, he would write her a generic prescription to go back to Chile?

I cry after my mom tells me about kids at my sister's school chanting, "Build a wall." 

Diaz  claims to want to be an American but doesn't want any border security.

Three weeks after the election, I still feel broken. I still feel the knife that America stabbed into my back. To so many in America, I was not worth anything. Disposable, replaceable. My work over the past 17 years meant absolutely nothing to them. 

Note the sense of entitlement.  Diaz broke the law, and when the law finally catches up with her, she feels like the victim.  She views being deported for her crime as a knife in the back.

This is a woman who got a Harvard education, perhaps with financial aid, that most legal immigrants could only dream of.  She took the place of an American citizen to go to Harvard.  She took the place of a legal immigrant to come to America.  Now that she fears she might be held accountable, she lashes out with demands of privilege and considers herself noble and the queen of virtue.

Questions for discussion:

1) I would not be surprised if Harvard gives preferences to illegal aliens.  What do you think would be Harvard's reaction if unaccepted 18-year-olds showed up at the beginning of the school year and started attending classes and squatting in the dorms?  Would they be welcome with open arms as "undocumented" students?

2) Illegal aliens usually complain that violence in their native lands entitles them to emigrate to America.  Chile has no such problems.  Do liberals now believe that immigrants need no compelling reason at all for entering the country illegally?

3) This woman is fearful of being deported.  Do you think she went through 27 rolls of toilet paper before or after she gave her full name to the Washington Post?

4) What kind of person keeps 27 rolls of toilet paper in her home?

Ed Straker is the senior writer at NewsMachete.com.  When he graduated from Harvard, he cried through only 14 rolls of toilet paper.

It's getting harder and harder to write an original "illegal aliens feel terrified by Trump" article simply because so many have been written.  Topping the level of hysteria of the previous ones becomes more and more difficult.  But the WaPo may have succeeded with this story of a super-virtuous illegal alien named Lisette Candia Diaz, who went to Harvard and then, when Donald Trump won the election, had a mental breakdown on the toilet.

First, the virtue:

My Harvard acceptance proved it was all worth it: the blood that covered my dad's hands after his long shifts, the tears my mom shed because she missed her family in Chile, the frustration they both endured from being unable to fulfill their full potential, all of the times they were humiliated because they didn't speak English well enough or understand American culture.

Some thoughts:

1) Blood on her father's hands?  Diaz doesn't say his profession.  Did he work in a slaughterhouse, or was he a contract killer for a drug cartel?

2) If her mother missed her family in Chile, why didn't she go home?

3) The parents came to the country illegally and felt humiliated when they didn't learn English?

I spent election night on the bathroom floor of my apartment. I curled my body into a ball and lay on the floor of the same bathroom I had nervously cleaned earlier in the day. I counted and recounted the tiles on the floor. I stared at the white ceiling as static noise filled my ears. The results poured in on my phone. Between wiping my eyes and blowing my nose, I made my way through the rolls of toilet paper in our cabinet. We had 27 rolls of toilet paper.

Is this a mental breakdown or merely the sign of a guilty conscience?  Maybe "I broke the law, and they are finally going to catch up with me!"

I was told that if I worked hard, then everything would turn out okay. I did all my homework on time; I always raised my hand before speaking; I followed all of the rules.

Diaz has the same attitude as the immigrant drug dealer who says she too followed all the rules.  Except for one big one: illegally entering the country.

My migraines are getting worse. Three weeks out, and sometimes I lie on my bed because I don't have the energy to get up. I relive Nov. 8 in my head.

Do you think that if Diaz saw a doctor, he would write her a generic prescription to go back to Chile?

I cry after my mom tells me about kids at my sister's school chanting, "Build a wall." 

Diaz  claims to want to be an American but doesn't want any border security.

Three weeks after the election, I still feel broken. I still feel the knife that America stabbed into my back. To so many in America, I was not worth anything. Disposable, replaceable. My work over the past 17 years meant absolutely nothing to them. 

Note the sense of entitlement.  Diaz broke the law, and when the law finally catches up with her, she feels like the victim.  She views being deported for her crime as a knife in the back.

This is a woman who got a Harvard education, perhaps with financial aid, that most legal immigrants could only dream of.  She took the place of an American citizen to go to Harvard.  She took the place of a legal immigrant to come to America.  Now that she fears she might be held accountable, she lashes out with demands of privilege and considers herself noble and the queen of virtue.

Questions for discussion:

1) I would not be surprised if Harvard gives preferences to illegal aliens.  What do you think would be Harvard's reaction if unaccepted 18-year-olds showed up at the beginning of the school year and started attending classes and squatting in the dorms?  Would they be welcome with open arms as "undocumented" students?

2) Illegal aliens usually complain that violence in their native lands entitles them to emigrate to America.  Chile has no such problems.  Do liberals now believe that immigrants need no compelling reason at all for entering the country illegally?

3) This woman is fearful of being deported.  Do you think she went through 27 rolls of toilet paper before or after she gave her full name to the Washington Post?

4) What kind of person keeps 27 rolls of toilet paper in her home?

Ed Straker is the senior writer at NewsMachete.com.  When he graduated from Harvard, he cried through only 14 rolls of toilet paper.

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