Hispanic Los Angeles neighborhood tells 'white' art galleries: 'Get out!'

Racial diversity, we are told, is a great thing – unless the people moving in are white.  That's why it's no surprise that a heavily Hispanic neighborhood of Los Angeles is calling for "white" art galleries to pack up and get out.

The message on the steel roll-up gate of Mihai Nicodim's gallery could not have been clearer: With obscene language, the spray-painted words condemned what they labeled "white art."

It was not the first time Mr. Nicodim had been targeted by activists in Boyle Heights, a neighborhood long seen as the heart of Los Angeles's Mexican-American community. Just days before, two cars pulled in front of his gallery during an opening and the passengers, their faces covered in bandannas, hurled potatoes, hitting one woman in the leg. At the opening of another gallery, protesters threw beer bottles through the windows.

Earlier this fall, activists placed mock eviction notices in front of galleries. Marching down the street, they shouted "fuera!" — "out!" — and carried signs declaring "Keep Beverly Hills Out of Boyle Heights."

The activists in the neighborhood are making no apologies for the radical tactics and portray themselves as defenders of working-class neighborhoods in the city. They look to other neighborhoods, such as Echo Park and Silver Lake, that were once working class and are now filled with upscale bakeries that sell artisan doughnuts and have replaced mom-and-pop taco shops....

The gallery owners see the focus on race as misplaced and unfair. After Eva Chimento opened Chimento Contemporary last year, she said, two activists came into her gallery, threatened her and demanded that she show Latino artists.

When some people protest low-income minorities moving into their neighborhoods, they are called racist, and the Justice Department immediately swoops in to investigate.  When white people try to open businesses in minority neighborhoods, they are called "gentrifiers," and the government is silent.  It's part of a continuing trend of the government to treat white people as second-class citizens, and all it does is breed racial resentment.

Ironically, most art is neither "white" nor "non-white" unless it's specifically focused on race.  It's merely art.  But demonstrators see too many art galleries and too few taco shops, which is only one way the massive wave of illegal immigration is remaking America.

Ed Straker is the senior writer at NewsMachete.com.

Racial diversity, we are told, is a great thing – unless the people moving in are white.  That's why it's no surprise that a heavily Hispanic neighborhood of Los Angeles is calling for "white" art galleries to pack up and get out.

The message on the steel roll-up gate of Mihai Nicodim's gallery could not have been clearer: With obscene language, the spray-painted words condemned what they labeled "white art."

It was not the first time Mr. Nicodim had been targeted by activists in Boyle Heights, a neighborhood long seen as the heart of Los Angeles's Mexican-American community. Just days before, two cars pulled in front of his gallery during an opening and the passengers, their faces covered in bandannas, hurled potatoes, hitting one woman in the leg. At the opening of another gallery, protesters threw beer bottles through the windows.

Earlier this fall, activists placed mock eviction notices in front of galleries. Marching down the street, they shouted "fuera!" — "out!" — and carried signs declaring "Keep Beverly Hills Out of Boyle Heights."

The activists in the neighborhood are making no apologies for the radical tactics and portray themselves as defenders of working-class neighborhoods in the city. They look to other neighborhoods, such as Echo Park and Silver Lake, that were once working class and are now filled with upscale bakeries that sell artisan doughnuts and have replaced mom-and-pop taco shops....

The gallery owners see the focus on race as misplaced and unfair. After Eva Chimento opened Chimento Contemporary last year, she said, two activists came into her gallery, threatened her and demanded that she show Latino artists.

When some people protest low-income minorities moving into their neighborhoods, they are called racist, and the Justice Department immediately swoops in to investigate.  When white people try to open businesses in minority neighborhoods, they are called "gentrifiers," and the government is silent.  It's part of a continuing trend of the government to treat white people as second-class citizens, and all it does is breed racial resentment.

Ironically, most art is neither "white" nor "non-white" unless it's specifically focused on race.  It's merely art.  But demonstrators see too many art galleries and too few taco shops, which is only one way the massive wave of illegal immigration is remaking America.

Ed Straker is the senior writer at NewsMachete.com.