Coming attractions in the Trump presidency: The Paris Climate Accord

When he assumes the presidency, Donald Trump will deliver on his campaign promise to “cancel” the Paris Climate Accord in a way that has a big payoff for conservative principles.  Benny Peiser, director of the London-based Global Warming Policy Forum, has the strategy Trump is all but certain to adopt.  Writing in the Financial Post:

[P]resident-elect Trump does not need to “cancel” the Paris agreement to fulfill his promise and that of his party. He should simply submit it to the Senate for advice and consent under Article II, Section 2, of the U.S. Constitution. That properly constitutional approach would spell the end of it.

That is exactly the plan that Myron Ebell, who leads Trump’s transition team for the Environmental Protection Agency, has suggested. There are many good reasons for such a constitutional approach. But the most important one is that a failure to do so would cement Obama’s policy of unilateral treaty-making and set a dangerous precedent.

Sending Obama's folly to the Senate will be an educational opportunity – to let the American public know how seriously Obama and the Democrats overstepped their bounds and cement as legitimate the reasons for skepticism on the doom scenarios.  The media consensus on warmism is far more genuine than any claimed scientific consensus.  But Donald Trump doesn't need to depend on the media to make his case.  As president, Trump will continue to use social media to access the public directly.  We have yet to see how he will use his reality television experience to express his message to the public.

A lot of principled conservatives are worried about Trump, and I understand their concerns.  But I want to judge him on his use of the opportunities the election has handed him and the GOP.  He has a big prize with this issue.

When he assumes the presidency, Donald Trump will deliver on his campaign promise to “cancel” the Paris Climate Accord in a way that has a big payoff for conservative principles.  Benny Peiser, director of the London-based Global Warming Policy Forum, has the strategy Trump is all but certain to adopt.  Writing in the Financial Post:

[P]resident-elect Trump does not need to “cancel” the Paris agreement to fulfill his promise and that of his party. He should simply submit it to the Senate for advice and consent under Article II, Section 2, of the U.S. Constitution. That properly constitutional approach would spell the end of it.

That is exactly the plan that Myron Ebell, who leads Trump’s transition team for the Environmental Protection Agency, has suggested. There are many good reasons for such a constitutional approach. But the most important one is that a failure to do so would cement Obama’s policy of unilateral treaty-making and set a dangerous precedent.

Sending Obama's folly to the Senate will be an educational opportunity – to let the American public know how seriously Obama and the Democrats overstepped their bounds and cement as legitimate the reasons for skepticism on the doom scenarios.  The media consensus on warmism is far more genuine than any claimed scientific consensus.  But Donald Trump doesn't need to depend on the media to make his case.  As president, Trump will continue to use social media to access the public directly.  We have yet to see how he will use his reality television experience to express his message to the public.

A lot of principled conservatives are worried about Trump, and I understand their concerns.  But I want to judge him on his use of the opportunities the election has handed him and the GOP.  He has a big prize with this issue.

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